iMac CD set (1998)

When the original iMac shipped in 1998, it had a unique design never before seen in a personal computer. Apple also took the opportunity to redesign the internal packaging of the iMac, down to the book of CDs that shipped with every iMac.

The iMac CD book had cardboard front and back covers in bright yellow. Its white pages with clear fronts each held one CD. The iMac shipped with a bright orange Software Restore CD, a bright orange Software Install CD, and various third-party CDs, including Williams-Sonoma Good Cooking, Quicken 98, and others.

Apple Service Source CDs (1995-1998)

This collection of Apple Service Source CD-ROMs is from 1995–1998. These CDs were provided by Apple to allow authorized repairs of Apple equipment.

The CDs contain the following types of files and information:

Service Source Startup—A HyperCard document explaining the contents of the CD-ROM and a folder containing Service Source Files.

System Stuff (folder)—Applications and system files such as Apple QuickTime extension file, the Apple CD-ROM driver, 32-bit Color Quickdraw, and TeachText.

Disk Images (folder)—Applications such as HyperCard.

Clips (folder)—QuickTime movies and animations that demonstrate difficult repairs and the locations of hard-to-find components.

Viewer (folder)—Inside Mac Viewer, a utility to display archived and international-only service information.

Apple TechStep (folder)—release notes for late-breaking and critical information about TechStep tests.

AppleOrder (folder)—AppleOrder application.

Q-Stack TAC (folder)—HyperCard stack to send technical questions to the Apple Technical Assistance Center.

What’s New.Archive (TeachText document)—text file that archives the “What’s New” section of previous releases of Service Source, organized by release date and product.

Source: Macintosh Repository (1995, 1997, 1998)

Apple CD media (1998)

My collection of Apple CD and DVD media includes operating systems, applications, software collections that shipped with devices, promotional media, diagnostic tools, and educational content. In general, Apple-branded CD or DVD examples in original packaging have been presented separately, while single discs or collections of discs are presented chronologically.

Apple CDs from 1998 include:

  • Mac OS 8 (Version 8.1, 691-1912-A, U97073-121A, 1998)
  • FileMaker Home Page 3.0 (Web site design software, U98073-029C, 1997–1998)
  • WebObjects 4.0 Developer For Windows NT (1988–Version 4.0.1, Z691-2252-A, 1998)
  • Power Macintosh G3 For all-in-one computers (SSW 8.1, CD Version 1.0, 691-1802-A, 1998)
  • Power Macintosh G3 For all-in-one computers (SSW 8.1, CD Version 1.1, 691-2043-A, 1998)
  • Power Macintosh G3 Minitower and Desktop Computers (SSW 8.5, CD Version 1.0, 691-2121-A, 1998)
  • Mac OS 8.5 (Version 8.5, 691-2157-A, 1998)
  • Mac OS 8.5 (Version 8.5, 691-2017-A, 1998)
  • iMac bundle, including iMac Software Restore (SSW Version 8.1, CD Version 1.0, 691-2044-A, 1998)

When the original iMac was released in 1998, Apple changed the CD packaging to a book style. The CD book had cardboard front and back covers in bright yellow. The general software license was printed on the inside covers (in the Apple Garamond font), and the Apple CDs inside were bright orange in white CD sleeves with a clear vinyl front. In addition to the Apple CDs, various bundled software was also included such as a Willams-Sonoma cookbook and Quicken.

Macintosh Server G3/300 Minitower (1998)

The Macintosh Server G3/300 Minitower was released in 1998 as the final beige tower design by Apple. This G3 Server used a 300 MHz PowerPC 750 G3 processor, a single 4.0 GB SCSI hard drive (with space for a second drive), and a 24x CD-ROM drive.

This minitower also contained a “Whisper personality card” that added audio input and output ports. According to LowEndMac, Apple had planned various “personality cards,” but only audio (“Whisper”), audio/video (“Wings”), and audio/video/DVD playback (“Bordeaux”) were ever produced.

The case design of this minitower includes a removable side panel and two internal tabs that, when released, allow the entire tower to tilt 90 degrees on a hinge allowing easy access to all internal components. Interestingly, the side door panel latch and internal tabs are made from translucent blue-green plastic, a design aesthetic that would soon become the Mac design norm that same year when the original iMac was released.

Ports on this computer include SCSI; ADB (Apple Desktop Bus); Ethernet (10-100); Mac serial and printer ports; Apple Video (DB-15), line-out and microphone 3.5 mm jacks. Three card slots are available: the first is empty, but ready for a high-speed SCSI port; the second slot has a second high-speed ethernet port; and the third slot adds two USB ports.

The exact factory configuration of the server is shown as: 1MB Cache/128MB/2x4GB UW/CD/10-100 ENET. The model is M4405, and the serial number area specifies a production date of May 27, 1998, at 3:30 PM.

Sources: EveryMac, LowEndMac

Apple USB Keyboard (strawberry, 1998)

The Apple USB Keyboard design was the first Apple keyboard available in translucent plastic and was released with the original iMac in matching Bondi blue. As the name implies, it connected to the computer using USB and included two additional USB ports on the right and left rear of the keyboard. This keyboard removed the “extended” keys, but retained the right-side numeric keypad. The Apple USB Keyboard includes a single support leg spanning the entire width of the keyboard to slightly elevate the back of the keyboard. This was the last Apple keyboard design to include a power button.

This example is strawberry (dark pink) and was shipped with a strawberry iMac. In addition to strawberry, this keyboard was also available in Bondi blue, graphite, tangerine, lime, blueberry, and grape.

As of 2020 Apple has released approximately 20 external keyboard designs. In general, Apple Macintosh keyboards are different from standard keyboards because they include a Command key (⌘) for shortcuts; an Option key (⌥) for entering diacritical marks and special characters; and a Help or fn (function) key. Earlier Apple keyboards also included a power key (◁), while newer keyboards include eject (⏏).

Source: Wikipedia

Apple USB Keyboard (blueberry, 1998)

The Apple USB Keyboard was released with the original Bondi blue iMac in 1998. This keyboard used translucent plastics to match the iMac models that shipped with them for the next two years and was available in Bondi blue, blueberry, strawberry, lime, tangerine, grape, and graphite.

The bottom of the keyboard included a support leg that allowed the keyboard to lay flat or tilt up. The keyboard included a full row of half-height function (fn) keys, a keypad, and a dedicated power key in the upper-right corner.

Source: Wikipedia.org

USB Mouse balls (OEM replacement, 1998)

The original Apple USB Mouse, model M4848, used a half-teal blue and half-white ball that matched the Bondi blue iMac. When new iMac colors were introduced (blueberry, strawberry, lime, tangerine, and grape) the teal and white ball continued to be used until it was replaced with a gray and white ball.

These teal and white USB Mouse balls are official replacement parts provided by Apple.

USB Mouse (blueberry, M4848, 1998)

The Apple USB Mouse was first released with the original iMac. The mouse was translucent white and accented in translucent Bondi blue, the same colors as the original iMac. The mouse was round and often referred to as the “hockey puck” mouse. Like previous Apple mouse designs, the USB mouse used a single button and a rubber ball for tracking. However, the rubber ball was two-toned to add design interest by capitalizing on the translucent case.

The mouse has been described as a rare design mistake for Apple because its round shape made it difficult to feel the top of the device, making tracking difficult. Soon after its release, Apple added a dimple in the graphite version of the mouse at the top above the button. The dimple remained on all subsequent versions of the USB Mouse, including this example.

The mouse also had a short cord. Although the cord worked well when plugged into the USB port on a matching iMac keyboard, the cord was too short to use (for right-handed users) with Mac laptops at the time since USB ports were located on the left side. 

Early versions of the USB Mouse included a two-toned blue and white trackball (regardless of the color of the mouse). Later versions switched to the more neutral gray and white trackball. Both versions are shown below.

Source: Wikipedia.com

USB Mouse (strawberry, M4848, 1998)

The Apple USB Mouse was first released with the original iMac. The mouse was translucent white and accented in translucent Bondi blue, the same colors as the original iMac. The mouse was round and often referred to as the “hockey puck” mouse. Like previous Apple mouse designs, the USB mouse used a single button and a rubber ball for tracking. However, the rubber ball was two-toned to add design interest by capitalizing on the translucent case.

The mouse has been described as a rare design mistake for Apple because its round shape made it difficult to feel the top of the device, making tracking difficult. Soon after its release, Apple added a dimple in the graphite version of the mouse at the top above the button. The dimple remained on all subsequent versions of the USB Mouse, including this example.

The mouse also had a short cord. Although the cord worked well when plugged into the USB port on a matching iMac keyboard, the cord was too short to use (for right-handed users) with Mac laptops at the time since USB ports were located on the left side. 

Source: Wikipedia.com