Mac OS X Server box (2003)

This box is the retail packaging for Mac OS X Server, Version 10.3 Panther. The artwork on the box changed considerably from the previous Jaguar-fur-covered X in Apple Garamond to a new, more blocky serif font with a metallic finish.

This version was released on October 24, 2003, and added LDAP-based Open Directory user and file management.

A new Workgroup Manager application allowed for a vast improvement for configuration. Other network services were added or improved including SNMP, Apache web server, mail server, OpenLDAP, AFP, print server, SMB version 3 (improved Windows compatibility), MySQL (4.0.16), and PHP (4.3.7).

The box indicates that it contains Mac OS X Server v10.3, Admin Tools, Xcode, getting started guide, electronic documentation.

Source: Wikipedia (Panther, Mac OS X Server)

Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard box (2007)

This is the retail box for Mac OS X Leopard, Version 10.5. Although the OS features the codename “Leopard,” Apple instead chose to use a metallic print idea highlighting a space theme (echoing a new space-themed wallpaper included with the release) for the artwork.

The box highlights five new features of apps and services in the OS:

  • Finder—See your files in Cover Flow.
  • Spaces—Organize your windows.
  • Time Machine—Automatic backup.
  • Mail—Stylish email stationery.
  • iChat—Add effects to video chat.

Apple described this update as “the largest update of Mac OS X” with over 300 new features. Leopard was also the first Mac OS X version to drop support for the Classic Environment that allowed users to run Mac OS 9 “Classic” apps within Mac OS X.

Source: Wikipedia

Mac OS X Server 10.6 box (2011)

The Mac OS X Server Version 10.6 Snow Leopard Server retail box was white and used a photo of a snow leopard as the front box art.

Its tagline, shown on the back of the box, was: “More power to your business. Communicate, collaborate, and share with Snow Leopard Server.” Six featured technologies shown on the box back included:

  • Server Preferences
  • Wiki Server 2
  • Podcast Producer 2
  • iCal Server 2
  • Mail Server
  • Address Book Server

This was the first Mac OS X Server version to include Mobile Access Server to allow iPhone and Mac users to access secured network services with SSL encryption and authentication between a user’s iPhone or Mac and a private network.

Snow Leopard Server was only available in an unlimited client license and cost $499.

Source: Wikipedia

Xsan 2 box (2008)

This Xsan 2 retail box from 2008 includes the software to set up Apple’s SAN (Storage Area Network) solution on a Mac with a G5 processor with an Apple Fibre Channel card running Mac OS X or Mac OS X Server 10.5 or later.

The box uses the tagline, “Share terabytes of storage. Zero bottlenecks.”

The four key technologies highlighted on the box include:

  • Simplified setup
  • MultiSAN
  • Full-throttle performance
  • Spotlight

The Xsan 2 setup guide is not for the faint of heart. It lists “Equipment You’ll Need” and specifies, “To set up a SAN using the instructions in this guide, you need:”

  • RAID storage devices for SAN storage
  • Two computers running Mac OS X Server v10.5 to act as SAN metadata controllers
  • One or more SAN client computers running Mac OS X v10.5 or Mac OS X Server v10.5
  • An Intel or PowerPC G5 processor and at least 2 GB of RAM in each SAN computer
  • An additional 2 GB per SAN volume in each metadata controller that hosts more
  • than one SAN volume
  • An Apple Fibre Channel PCI, PCI-X, or PCI-E card installed in each SAN computer
  • A Fibre Channel switch and cables for all storage devices and computers
  • An Ethernet switch and cables for the private SAN metadata network
  • A second Ethernet switch and cables for public intranet and Internet access
  • An equipment rack for your RAID storage systems and Xserve computers
  • A list of qualified RAID systems and Fibre Channel switches is available on the Xsan website at www.apple.com/xsan

Source: Apple

Newton Press box (1995)

Newton Press was a software application for the Newton, Apple’s handheld Personal Digital Assistant. On a two-page MessagePad Accessories sheet, Newton Press is described:

Newton Press
This easy-to-use software allows you to publish electronic documents such as travel itineraries, reference books, or sales charts on your personal computer for viewing and annotating on your MessagePad.

The box states:

“Create documents on your desktop computer, then publish them as Newton books. Drag and drop word processing documents, graphics files, or text created on your personal computer directly to the Newton Press application for simple, one-step creation of Newton electronic reference books. Or use the formatting capabilities to format your books, create tables of contents, establish paragraph links, and more. Anyone with a Newton personal digital assistant (PDA) can view, annotate, fax, or print the books you create.”

This copy of Newton Press is unopened and in its original shrink wrap.

Source: Apple

Mac OS X Server box (unopened, 2001)

This version of Mac OS X Server, Mac OS X Server 10.1, was code named “Puma” and was released on September 25, 2001, just four months after Mac OS X Server 10.0.

This version and its predecessor (v.10.0 “Cheetah”) of Mac OS X Server replaced Mac OS X Server 1.0 and added all the features of Mac OS X to the server product, beginning with the new Aqua user interface. Other significant additions included Apache, PHP, MySQL, Tomcat, WebDAV support, and Macintosh Manager 2.

File services included:

  • Macintosh (AFP over TCP/IP)
  • Windows (Samba; SMB/CIFS)
  • Internet (FTP)
  • UNIX and Linux (NFS)

Internet and web services included:

  • Apache web server
  • QuickTime Streaming Server
  • WebObjects 5 Deployment
  • Mail (SMTP, POP, IMAP)
  • WebDAV
  • SSL
  • PHP
  • MySQL
  • JavaServer pages
  • Java Servelets
  • Caching web proxy

This box is shrink-wrapped and has never been opened. It contains:

  • Mac OS X Server CD (v10.1)
  • Macintosh Manager 2 CD
  • NetBoot CD
  • WebObjects 5 Deployment CD
  • Developer Tools CD
  • Installation Guide and electronic documentation

Source: Wikipedia

Mac OS X box (2001)

This Mac OS X box is the original retail box for the Mac OS X v10.0 operating system. Somewhat ironically, it shipped with a Mac OS 9 CD.

The box lists the Mac OS X Core technologies as:

  • Aqua
  • Darwin
  • Quartz
  • OpenGL 3D
  • QuickTime 5
  • Classic
  • Carbon and Cocoa
  • Java 2 Standard Edition
  • Apple Type Services
  • AppleScript
  • ColorSync
  • Unicode
  • BSD networking

The inside flap of the box offers a less technical version of Mac OS X’s features: “The super-modern operating system that delivers the power of UNIX with the legendary simplicity and elegance of the Macintosh.”

The four key technologies discussed include:

  • Unprecedented Stability and Performance
  • Designed for the Internet Age
  • Killer Graphics
  • Easy Transition

Source: Wikipedia

Mac OS X Server box (1999)

Mac OS X Server 1.0 was released on March 16, 1999, and was based on a combination of NeXT technology and Mac OS 8. Although the appearance of the OS is based on the platinum appearance in Mac OS 8, the software is based on OPENSTEP (NeXTSTEP).

Interestingly, Mac OS X Server was released almost two years before the Mac OS X operating system public beta. I remember it being used in a computer lab at a middle school in the first district where I served as Tech Director. We were testing the new NetBoot server that purportedly allowed multiple computers to boot from a disk image over a local network. It did not work for our purposes.

This is the original Mac OS X Server box that sold at the time for $499.

Source: Wikipedia

Mac OS 9 9.0.4 box (2000)

Mac OS 9 was Apple’s final version of its “Classic” operating system. This iteration, version 9.0.4, was released April 4, 2000, and its changes included “Improved USB and FireWire support and other bug fixes.”

This specific boxed version is a 10-client license and features iTools, Apple’s first suite of online services that would eventually become iCloud.

The box also mentions that Mac OS 9 introduces “more than 50 new features” and includes “nine Internet power tools.” The tools include:

  1. Sherlock 2
  2. Multiple Users
  3. Voiceprint Password
  4. Keychain
  5. Auto Updating
  6. Encryption
  7. File Sharing over the Internet
  8. AppleScript over TCP/IP
  9. Network Browser

Source: Wikipedia

Keynote box (2003)

Keynote was announced by Steve Jobs as an app created for him for his world-renowned presentations. (Previously Jobs had used the application Concurrence by Lighthouse Design.)

This is the box version of Keynote 1.0 from 2003. Keynote was sold as a separate application for about two years until it joined Pages as a part of Apple’s iWork suite of software tools.

In my opinion, Keynote has been far superior to PowerPoint and other presentation applications since its release. Keynote used 3D slide transitions and builds that take full advantage of OpenGL, the graphics system that is part of macOS. Keynote has always perfectly handled imported media since it supports all QuickTime formats available in macOS.

I have been a Keynote user since its beta release in 2003 and have seldom used other presentation formats.

Source: Wikipedia