iPod 6-pin–to–4-pin FireWire Adapter (for iPod Generation 3, 2003)

The iPod 6-pin–to–4-pin FireWire Adapter was specifically included with the iPod Generation 3 (Dock Connector) to make it compatible with Windows computers. According to the iPod User’s Guide:

To use iPod with a Windows PC, you must have:
• A Windows PC with 500 MHz or higher processor speed
• Windows 2000 with Service Pack 4 or later, or Windows XP Home or Professional
• iTunes 4.2 or later (iTunes is included on the iPod CD). To be sure you have the latest version of iTunes, go to www.apple.com/itunes.
• iPod software (included on the iPod CD)
• Built-in FireWire or a FireWire card installed, or built-in USB 2.0 or a USB 2.0 card and the optional iPod Dock Connector to USB 2.0 + FireWire Cable

Although all Mac computers at the time had a 6-pin FireWire port built in, Windows computers had many different possible ports. For Windows, the iPod Generation 3 could support three connectors: USB port (USB 2.0 recommended), 6-pin FireWire 400 port (IEEE 1394), or 4-pin FireWire 400 port (with included adapter).

The 4-pin FireWire adapter only supported data transfer, it could not charge the iPod.

Source: Apple (manual, Identify your iPod model)

Microfiber Case for iPod

This iPod microfiber case shipped with one of the iPod models. The case is a microfiber-lined sleeve with stitched sides and the iPod logotype embossed on the top edge in the Myriad Apple font. The case measures 118×76 mm.

iPod Generation 2 Lenticular Card (2002)

This card is an advertisement for the Generation 2 iPod. The Generation 2 iPod was similar to the original iPod and looks identical in this ad, but the device used a touch wheel instead of a physically rotating wheel to scroll throughout the interface.

The card is printed using a lenticular printing technique that shows two different designs, depending upon the angle the card is held. The card is notably the actual size of the iPod.

The front card has two lenticular designs: the Apple logo and name iPod (the iPod startup screen), and an interface screen capture showing the Artists screen with six artists including David Bowie, Moby, Busta Rhymes, Ash, Carl Cox, and John Digweed (Moby is selected).

The back of the card is bright orange and includes the text: “Introducing the newest iPod with the room for more than 4000 songs. For Mac and now Windows.”

I have three of these cards in my collection, all identical.

iPod carrying case (for iPad Generation 3, 2004)

According to the iPod User’s Guide (for iPod Generation 3), “Your iPod includes the following components: iPod, 6-pin–to–4-pin FireWire adapter, iPod Dock (with some models), iPod Dock Connector to FireWire Cable, Apple Earphones, iPod Remote (with some models), iPod Power Adapter.” Also noted, “Some models of iPod also include a carrying case (not pictured).”

Thus, this iPod carrying case was included with some models of the iPod Generation 3. The carrying case is constructed of a rigid, nylon-covered enclosure with open sides. Elastic straps keep the iPod secure inside the carrying case. The inside of the case is a soft microfiber material and contains a small gray tag with a white Apple logo. The back of the case includes a durable plastic belt clip.

Source: Apple

iPod remote (for iPad Generation 3, unopened, 2004)

According to the iPod User’s Guide (for iPod Generation 3), “Your iPod includes the following components: iPod, 6-pin–to–4-pin FireWire adapter, iPod Dock (with some models), iPod Dock Connector to FireWire Cable, Apple Earphones, iPod Remote (with some models), iPod Power Adapter.”

Thus, this iPod Remote was included with some models of the iPod Generation 3. The iPod Remote uses a two-sided port that includes the headphone port and the iPod Remote port. With the iPod Remote’s dual plugs connected, you must plug your headphones into a second headphone port located on the remote.

The iPod User’s Guide explains: “To use the iPod Remote, connect it to the iPod Remote port, then connect the Apple Earphones (or another set of headphones) to the remote. Use the buttons on the remote just as you would use the iPod buttons.”

The iPod Remote includes a “rocker”-style (side-by-side) button for volume up/down, a play/pause button, a forward button, and a back button. The iPod Remote also includes a clip (to attach the remote to clothing), and Hold slider on the side.

Source: Apple

iPod Remote (for original iPod, 2001)

According to the iPod User’s Guide (for the original iPod), “The iPod Remote is included with some models of iPod and can be purchased separately.”

The iPod Remote includes a “rocker”-style (side-by-side) button for volume up/down, a play/pause button, a forward button, and a back button. The iPod Remote also includes a clip (to attach the remote to clothing), and Hold slider on the side.

The iPod User’s Guide explains its use: “To use the iPod Remote, connect it to iPod’s headphones port, then connect the Apple Earphones (or another set of headphones) to the remote. Use the remote to adjust volume, play or pause a song, fast-forward and rewind, and skip to the next or previous song. Set the remote’s Hold switch to disable the remote’s buttons.”

Source: Apple

iPod shuffle Dock (for Generation 2 iPod shuffle, 2006)

Apple introduced the Generation 2 iPod shuffle in September 2006 and advertised it as “the most wearable iPod ever,” due to a clip on the back that could easily attach the iPod shuffle to clothing.

The iPod shuffle was so small that the 30-pin iPod dock could not be used to charge or transfer music and data to the device. Instead, the Generation 2 iPod shuffle used this iPod shuffle Dock. The dock connected to a computer with an attached USB cable and data transfer and recharging was handled through the dock’s headphone jack.

The iPod shuffle Dock was only available in white, even though the iPod shuffle was available in several colors [silver, two variations of pink, orange, green, and blue; and turquoise, lavender, mint green, and (PRODUCT)RED].

Source: Wikipedia

Original iPod headphones (Generation 2, 2002)

The Original iPod headphones were the earbuds that shipped with the original iPod. They sounded quite good, shipped with two sets of black foam ear covers, were sometimes panned for not fitting some people’s ears, and came with the iPod at no additional cost so most iPod users used them.

Perhaps the most important, and in my opinion overlooked, feature of these headphones was not the specs, but the color. Soon after the iPod was introduced in 2001, an iconic ad campaign was released in 2003 referred to as “silhouettes,” created by the company Chiat\Day. In each commercial, poster, print ad, or billboard, the all-black silhouette of a dancer moved over a brightly colored background (hot pink, lime green, yellow, or bright blue) while the highly-contrasted bright white headphone wire and iPod moved along with the dancer. The effect was striking and the white cord color effectively called attention to the product nearly screaming, “I’m using an iPod!”

The white earbud design not only became permanently associated with “cool” Apple gear, but 20 years later is still being used as the only color choice for Apple-branded headphones, EarPods, AirPods, and likely future Apple headphone iterations. (Apple-owned brand Beats, however, does produce many headphone styles in multiple colors.)

According to my research, this particular example of the original iPod headphone design is a Generation 2 release, identified as such due to the addition of a plastic slider to adjust the gap between the headphone wires.

Sources: GQ, Wikipedia

iPod classic (Generation 7, 120 GB, silver, 2008)

This Late 2018 iPod classic was very similar to the previous Generation 6 model. This iPod was available in 120 GB or 160 GB capacities, had a 2.5-inch color LCD display (320×240, 163 ppi), and was available with a black or silver anodized aluminum front and a chrome stainless steel back. This model is the third generation of the iPod classic.

The software included a Cover Flow option for selecting albums with three games bundled, including iQuiz, Klondike, and Vortex.

Source: EveryMac.com

Nike+iPod Sport Kit (2006)

The Nike+iPod Sport Kit was announced on May 23, 2006. A press released stated, “Nike and Apple today announced a partnership bringing the worlds of sports and music together like never before with the launch of innovative Nike+iPod products.” The two-piece wireless system included an oval sensor that was placed inside a Nike+ shoe and a 30-pin plug for the iPod nano.

Software on the iPod nano would connect to custom Nike+ footwear or any shoe with the Nike+iPod sensor attached and provided information on time, distance, calories burned, and pace on the iPod screen. In addition, “A new Nike Sport Music section on the iTunes Music Store and a new nikeplus.com personal service site help maximize the Nike+iPod experience.”

This kit was sold for $29 and included an in-shoe sensor and a receiver that attached to iPod. I used this device with both an iPod nano and with the first two iPhone models both on a treadmill and during my walks and run/walks. I attached the device to my running shoe laces with a purpose-built case that held the oval sensor. A later pair of shoes had a built-in slot in the arch of the sole that held the sensor.

Source: Apple.com