Mac OS X 10.2 box (2002)

Mac OS X Jaguar (version 10.2) was the third major release of Mac OS X, but it was arguably the first version that was intended for a wide audience.

Apple took the opportunity in this release to publicly acknowledge that “Jaguar” was the operating system’s code name and used the name in marketing. Further, the OS release artwork featured a detailed rendering of jaguar skin meant to highlight the enhanced graphics rendering technology built in to the architecture.

Jaguar was a paid upgrade for $129, except Apple offered a “X for Teachers” program that provided the OS for free to educators.

The box refers to the following “Featured technologies:”

  • AppleScript
  • Aqua
  • Bluetooth
  • Darwin
  • Inkwell
  • Java 2 Standard Edition
  • MIDI and multichannel audio
  • Open Directory
  • OpenGL 3D
  • Personal Firewall
  • Personal Printer Sharing
  • Quartz Extreme
  • QuickTime 6
  • Rendezvous

Source: Wikipedia

Mac Pro (Quad Core, 2.8 GHz, Mid-2010)

The Mac Pro Quad Core 2.8 uses a single 2.8 GHz Quad Core Xeon W3530 processor. The “quad core” designation refers to its single processor with four independent “core” processing centers that can work independently or together to increase computing speed and efficiency. It used 3 GB of RAM (DDR3 ECC SDRAM), a 1 TB Serial ATA hard drive, an 18X dual-layer SuperDrive, and an ATI Radeon HD 5770 graphics card.

The design of this tower was identical to its Power Mac G5 predecessor, using the same anodized aluminum alloy case with a removable side panel. The sides of the tower were solid aluminum with a light gray Apple logo printed on center. The front and back used a pattern of aluminum perforations as a design element, a structural feature, and as part of the ventilation for the internal systems.

The front of the tower included spaces for two optical drives at the top. On the lower-right was the power button and five ports: 3.5 mm headphone jack, two USB ports, and two FireWire 800 ports.

The back of the tower included five slots. Slot 1 includes a dual-link DVI port and two Mini DisplayPorts. Slot 2 is unused (and uses a ventilated cover), while slots 3–5 are unused. Rear ports include three USB 2.0 ports, two FireWire 800 ports, optical digital audio in/out ports, a 3.5 mm line-out audio jack, a 3.5 mm line-in audio jack, and two independent Gigabit Ethernet ports. Internally, wireless networking options include AirPort Extreme (802.11a/b/g/n) and Bluetooth 2.1.

Inside, the Mac Pro includes two 5.25-inch optical drive bays (both are outfitted with Apple SuperDrive drives in this example); four internal 3.5-inch cable-free, direct-attach hard drive bays (this model has three 512 GB drives); and four PCIe 2.0 slots, one with a graphics card installed.

Source: Everymac

Power Mac G5 (Dual Core, 2.3 GHz, 2005)

The Power Mac G5 tower represented a major design departure from the four previous Mac “pro” tower designs. The Power Mac G5 used an anodized aluminum alloy case design with a removable side panel that replaced the hinged door on previous Mac towers.

The sides of the Power Mac G5 were solid aluminum with a light gray Apple logo printed on center. The front and back used a pattern of aluminum perforations as design elements, structure, and as part of the ventilation for the internal systems.

This model is a Power Mac G5 Dual Core running at 2.3 GHz. The same design was available in a G5 Dual Core (2.0 GHz) and a G5 Quad Core (2.5 GHz) variation, with all models using 970MP G5 processors with two independent cores on a single chip. This tower included 512 MB or 1 GB RAM (SDRAM), a 250 GB (Serial ATA) hard drive, a 16x dual-layer SuperDrive, and a NVIDIA GeForce 6600 video card.

The front of the tower included a single optical drive, the power button, and three ports: one 3.5 mm headphone jack, one USB port, and a FireWire 400 port.

The back of the tower included four slots. Slot 1 includes two DVI ports (one single-link DVI and one dual-link DVI port), while slots 2–4 are unused. Rear ports include two independent Gigabit Ethernet ports, one FireWire 400 port, one FireWire 800 port, optical digital audio in/out ports, a 3.5 mm line-out audio jack, a 3.5 mm line-in audio jack, and three USB 2.0 ports.

Internally, the tower supports AirPort Extreme (802.11g) and Bluetooth 2.0 wireless protocols. Everymac reports that the inside of Power Mac G5 models were divided into “four different thermal zones with nine computer-controlled fans for optimum cooling.” Also, this Power Mac G5 has two internal hard drives.

The case design with its front and back aluminum perforations and handles is, indeed, reminiscent of a cheese grater—albeit a beautiful one.

Source: Everymac

Apple Pencil (original, 2015)

The original Apple Pencil was released along with the original iPad Pro in September 2015. The Apple Pencil can be used by the iPad Air (Generation 3), iPad mini (Generation 5), iPad Pro 10.5-inch, iPad (Generation 6 and 7), iPad Pro 12.9-inch (Generation 1 and 2), and iPad Pro 9.7-inch. It pairs to an iPad device using Bluetooth, and has a removable magnetically attached cap hiding a Lightning connector.

The original Apple Pencil somewhat awkwardly charges by plugging it into the lightning port of an Apple device; however, it also includes a female-to-female adapter that allows charging with a Lightning cable. While a full charge can last up to 12 hours, a 15-second charge provides about 30 minutes of use.

The Apple Pencil can be used for writing, drawing, or annotating in a wide variety of apps. Apple describes its features as having “pixel-perfect precision, tilt and pressure sensitivity, and imperceptible lag.”

Source: Wikipedia, Apple (description, specifications)

iPhone Bluetooth Headset (2007)

The iPhone Bluetooth Headset shipped along with the original iPhone in 2007. The design was minimalist and the device included just one button to accept/decline calls; place a call on hold/switch to a call on hold; and power the device on/off. Although the cost was relatively high at $129, the headset shipped with two additional charging methods, a dock for the iPhone and the iPhone Bluetooth Headset (with a connected USB cable); and an additional 30-pin travel cable that charged the iPhone and included an extra port to charge the iPhone Bluetooth Headset simultaneously.

Although the iPhone Bluetooth Headset had very good sound quality, it could not be used for any audio features other than phone calls—no voice dialing features or the ability to listen to iTunes or other iPhone audio was possible.

An AppleInsider review listed four “Pros:” Elegantly slim and very lightweight design; Comfortable to wear; Includes a dock and extra travel cable; Easy to set up and use. The same review included four “Cons:” Limited range and battery life; No fancy phone control features or redial; No iPhone audio support apart from phone calls; No voice dialing support.

Original iPhone owners, me included, purchased the original iPhone for $599, a price considered high at the time. About a month after the original iPhone’s release when the product was clearly becoming a success, Apple dropped the price by $99 and issued early iPhone purchasers a $99 Apple Store credit. I used this credit toward the purchase of this iPhone Bluetooth Headset.

Source: AppleInsider

MacBook Pro 15-inch (Core 2 Duo, 2.4 GHz, early 2008)

This MacBook Pro 15-inch laptop was released in early 2008 with an identical case design as its predecessor. It shipped with a 2.4 GHz Core 2 Duo (Penryn) processor and 2 GB of 667 MHz SDRAM. It contained a 200 GB hard drive and 8X DVD RW/CD-RW SuperDrive. The display was an LED-backlit 15.4-inch widescreen at 1440×900 resolution.

Although the external case did not change from the “Santa Rosa” processor version of the laptop that preceded it, the keyboard design removed the numeric keypad accessed using the fn (function) key and replaced the right-side enter key with an additional option key, the same laptop keyboard layout still in use now (as of February 2020). This MacBook Pro also used the same trackpad design as the MacBook Air of the time, adding multi-touch gestures.

Ports on this MacBook Pro included an ExpressCard slot, Gigabit Ethernet, FireWire 400, Firewire 800, two USB 2.0 ports, optical digital audio in/out, and DVI out. Wireless connections included AirPort Extreme (802.11a/b/g/n) and Bluetooth 2.1. It also included an iSight video camera and MagSafe power connector, both standard at the time.

When I acquired this laptop, its battery had burst while installed in the laptop. The battery failure caused the battery to bow in the center and it was lodged in the case. Using a few iFixIt spatula tools, I was able to extract it safely and then properly dispose of the ruptured battery.

Source: EveryMac

Apple Wireless Keyboard (2003)

This Apple Wireless Keyboard was Apple’s first wireless keyboard and used Bluetooth connectivity. Its design closely resembled the Apple Keyboard released four months earlier—white plastic keys in a clear shell. However, the Apple Wireless Keyboard lacked USB ports in the rear. The Apple Wireless Keyboard was powered by 4 AA batteries. Unlike later wireless keyboards, this one is not compatible with iPad.

As of 2020, this wireless keyboard is the first of three wireless keyboard designs offered by Apple and is among approximately 20 external keyboard designs. In general, Apple Macintosh keyboards are different from standard keyboards because they include a Command key (⌘) for shortcuts; an Option key (⌥) for entering diacritical marks and special characters; and a Help or fn (function) key. Earlier Apple keyboards also included a power key (◁), while newer keyboards include eject (⏏).

Source: Wikipedia (Apple Keyboard, Apple Wireless Keyboard)

iPad (Generation 7, Wi-Fi, 32 GB, unopened, 2019)

The Generation 7 iPad differs from previous base iPad models with its larger 10.2-inch screen at 2160×1620 (264 ppi) (the Generation 6 iPad had a 9.7-inch screen) and the addition of the Smart Connector. The Smart Connector allows this iPad to use an Apple Smart Keyboard. This iPad was available in three colors: white front with a gold back, white front with silver back, and black front with a Space Gray back. This example is Space Gray.

The Generation 7 iPad uses the Apple A10 Fusion processor with 3 GB of RAM, and has 32 GB or 128 GB of internal storage. It also has an 8 Megapixel iSight camera on the back (1080p) and a 1.2 Megapixel FaceTime camera (720p) on the front. Wireless connectivity includes 802.11ac Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.2,. Its two wired ports are the Lightning port and a 3.5mm audio port. Internal sensors include accelerometer, gyroscope, ambient light sensor, compass, and barometer.

Aside from this Wi-Fi model, three Wi-Fi/Cellular models are available (US/CA, Global, and China).

Source: EveryMac

MacBook Air 11-inch (2014)

This MacBook Air 11-inch featured a 22-nm Haswell 1.4 GHz Intel Core i5 processor. It included 4 GB or 8 GB of memory and 128 GB or 256 GB of flash storage. This was the smallest of Apple’s MacBook Air line of laptops measuring 0.11 to 0.68 inches and weighed 2.3 pounds. It included a 720p FaceTime HD webcam, a backlit full-size keyboard, and an 11.6-inch widescreen TFT LED backlit active-matrix glossy display (1366×768).

Wireless connectivity included 802.11ac Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.0, while ports included analog audio out, one Thunderbolt port, and two USB 3.0 ports.

A previous version of the MacBook Air 11-inch nearly identical except for a slower processor and less available RAM and flash storage.

In my role as Assistant Superintendent for Technology & Innovation, I led the teams that managed nearly 4,500 of these laptops over a five-year period (2014–19). At the time, all high school students in the school district were issued a MacBook Air 11-inch and students used the same model for their 4-year high school career. Apple stopped manufacturing this laptop in 2018 and the high school switched to the iPad Generation 6.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPhone 4S (2011)

The iPhone 4S was the product that first introduced the Siri voice assistant. The iPhone 4S was designed around a stainless-steel body with a glass front and back. It had a 3.5-inch LED-backlit 960×640 326 ppi multi-touch Retina display and included two noise-cancelling microphones. It was available in black or white.

The iPhone 4S supported both GSM and CDMA networks and included 802.11b/g/n and Bluetooth 4.0. It used a dual-core Apple A5 processor; 512 MB of RAM; and 8 GB, 16 GB, 32 GB, or 64 GB of internal storage. It had two cameras: an 8 megapixel HD camera (1080p at 30 FPS) with an LED flash on the rear and FaceTime camera on the front that allowed FaceTime video calls over Wi-Fi.

Source: EveryMac.com