Mobile Me box (2010)

MobileMe is the third in Apple’s iterations of online tools suites. This boxed version of MobileMe was available in 2010 and matched other Apple retail packaging of the time.

The history of Apple’s online services has included:

iTools (released 1-5-2000) with services including @mac.com email addresses (accessed through the Mail app), iCards free greeting card service, iReview web site reviews, HomePage free web page publishing, iDisk online data storage, and a KidSafe directory of child-friendly web sites.

.Mac (pronounced “dot Mac,” released 7-17-2002) with services including HomePage web hosting, iDisk online disk storage service, @mac.com email service (POP and IMAP), iCards online greeting cards, Backup personal backup (to iDisk, CD, or DVD), and McAfee Virex. Later enhancements included an online Mail interface, Back to My Mac remote desktop, Web Gallery, and the ability to add more online web storage and segment it according to purpose.

MobileMe (released 7-9-2008) had a difficult rollout where some users experienced instability over a period of several weeks. Steve Jobs later wrote, “it was a mistake to launch MobileMe at the same time as iPhone 3G, iPhone 2.0 software, and the App Store.” Customers received a free 60-day extension of MobileMe services. Although .Mac removed some services, including iCards and some specific web services, greater iLife integration was added and primary services continued to be expanded and upgraded.

iCloud (beginning Fall 2011) was released with iOS 5 and the iPhone 4S. iCloud includes email, calendar, file across multiple devices, 5 GB of free cloud storage, and offers additional paid tiers for more storage.

For users like me who have been customers since the iTools era, all email domains remain available, including @mac.com, @me.com, and @icloud.com.

This MobileMe software box is from 2010 and features several services on the packaging: online syncing of email, calendar, and contacts; the Find My iPhone or iPad service; online photo and file storage; and an image depicting the ability of MobileMe to share files and information among iPhone, Mac/Windows, and iPad via “the Cloud.”

Source: Wikipedia

Mobile Me box (2008)

MobileMe is the third in Apple’s iterations of online tools suites. This boxed version of MobileMe was available in 2008 and matched other Apple retail packaging of the time.

The history of Apple’s online services has included:

iTools (released 1-5-2000) with services including @mac.com email addresses (accessed through the Mail app), iCards free greeting card service, iReview web site reviews, HomePage free web page publishing, iDisk online data storage, and a KidSafe directory of child-friendly web sites.

.Mac (pronounced “dot Mac,” released 7-17-2002) with services including HomePage web hosting, iDisk online disk storage service, @mac.com email service (POP and IMAP), iCards online greeting cards, Backup personal backup (to iDisk, CD, or DVD), and McAfee Virex. Later enhancements included an online Mail interface, Back to My Mac remote desktop, Web Gallery, and the ability to add more online web storage and segment it according to purpose.

MobileMe (released 7-9-2008) had a difficult rollout where some users experienced instability over a period of several weeks. Steve Jobs later wrote, “it was a mistake to launch MobileMe at the same time as iPhone 3G, iPhone 2.0 software, and the App Store.” Customers received a free 60-day extension of MobileMe services. Although .Mac removed some services, including iCards and some specific web services, greater iLife integration was added and primary services continued to be expanded and upgraded.

iCloud (beginning Fall 2011) was released with iOS 5 and the iPhone 4S. iCloud includes email, calendar, file across multiple devices, 5 GB of free cloud storage, and offers additional paid tiers for more storage.

For users like me who have been customers since the iTools era, all email domains remain available, including @mac.com, @me.com, and @icloud.com.

This MobileMe software box is from 2008 and features several services on the packaging: online syncing of email, calendar, and contacts; online Photo gallery; online storage; and an image depicting the ability of MobileMe to share files and information among a Mac, iPhone, iPod touch, and Windows via “the Cloud.”

Source: Wikipedia

SIM Eject Tool (iPad, 2010)

The iPad SIM Eject Tool shipped with the original iPad. This tool is built into the envelope packaging that shipped with the iPad and is referenced in the iPad User Guide:

Remove the micro-SIM card:
1 Insert the end of the SIM eject tool into the hole on the SIM tray.
Press firmly and push the tool straight in until the tray pops out. If you don’t have a
SIM eject tool, you can use the end of a paper clip.
2 Pull out the SIM tray and remove the micro-SIM card from the tray.

The SIM Eject Tool is no longer included with products that include a SIM card. Instead, the Apple website recommends and depicts a somewhat inelegant bent paperclip for ejecting SIM cards.

Back in 2010, the SIM Eject Tool became newsworthy when it was disclosed that Apple had manufactured this tool from a metal alloy known as Liquidmetal. This news came after Apple “entered into an exclusive agreement with Liquidmetal Technologies.” The alloy is described as an “amorphous, non-crystalline material…2.5 times the strength of commonly used titanium alloy and 1.5 times the hardness of stainless steel found in portable electronic devices.” (AppleInsider)

Reports also stated that, “Liquidmetal Technologies has granted all of its intellectual property assets to Apple, under a worldwide agreement that gives Apple the exclusive rights to use the alloy in electronic products” at a cost of nearly $11 million (AppleInsider).

In 2018, Apple was granted patents for parts made of Liquidmetal, but the alloy has not been confirmed as being used in production, aside from this SIM Eject Tool.

Sources: Apple (iPad User Manual, SIM eject page), AppleInsider, Patently Apple

iPad 10W USB Power Adapter (unopened, 2011)

This iPad 10W USB Power Adapter is compatible with iPad, iPhone, iPod touch, and iPod nano devices with a 30-pin connector. The part number is MC359LL/A.

The box contains three parts, a 30-pin to USB cable, a power “brick,” and a removable 2-prong US power plug. This example is unopened in its original packaging.

30-pin Digital AV Adapter (unopened, 2012)

This adapter allows an iPad with the original 30-pin connector to be connected to an HDMI display and simultaneously charged. It is compatible with any iPad with a 30-pin connector, iPhone 4 (or later with a 30-pin connector), and iPod touch Generation 4 (or later with a 30-pin connector). Mirroring is supported only by iPad 2 (or later with a 30-pin connector) and iPhone 4s (or later with a 30-pin connector).

From my experience, the ability of an iPad to be mirrored on an HDMI screen is frequently misunderstood. Because an iPad screen is in the 4:3 aspect raitio, when it is mirrored on an HD display (16:9 aspect ratio or other wide format), some users are surprised that the entire external display is not “filled.” I have never been able to understand what the user is expecting—a ridiculously stretched version of the iPad display; a “zoomed” version of the iPad display with the top and bottom cut off; or that somehow the iPad will magically rearrange itself to fill a widescreen display, thus making it a completely new display and, therefore, not mirrored. Instead, the iPad works as expected and appears centered in the middle of a larger display with black bars on both sides (this is called “letterboxing”). If a user launches an app that uses the full screen, such as a presentation designed in HD format or an HD movie, the iPad fills the entire screen.

This 30-pin Digital AV Adapter is unopened in its original, somewhat beat up, packaging.

iPad Camera Connection Kit (2010)

According to Apple, the Apple iPad Camera Connection Kit supports “standard photo formats, including JPEG and RAW, along with SD and HD video formats, including H.264 and MPEG-4.” This connection kit is compatible with iPad Generations 1 –3 (using the 30-pin connector).

The kit consists of two adapters, the Camera Connector USB interface (plug it into the dock connector port on your iPad, then attach your digital camera or iPhone using a USB cable); and the SD Card Reader (import photos and videos directly from your camera’s SD card, connect it to your iPad, then insert your digital camera’s SD card into the slot).

I have both adapters and the original packaging in my collection.

Source: Apple (Australia), Wikipedia

Apple Pencil (original, 2015)

The original Apple Pencil was released along with the original iPad Pro in September 2015. The Apple Pencil can be used by the iPad Air (Generation 3), iPad mini (Generation 5), iPad Pro 10.5-inch, iPad (Generation 6 and 7), iPad Pro 12.9-inch (Generation 1 and 2), and iPad Pro 9.7-inch. It pairs to an iPad device using Bluetooth, and has a removable magnetically attached cap hiding a Lightning connector.

The original Apple Pencil somewhat awkwardly charges by plugging it into the lightning port of an Apple device; however, it also includes a female-to-female adapter that allows charging with a Lightning cable. While a full charge can last up to 12 hours, a 15-second charge provides about 30 minutes of use.

The Apple Pencil can be used for writing, drawing, or annotating in a wide variety of apps. Apple describes its features as having “pixel-perfect precision, tilt and pressure sensitivity, and imperceptible lag.”

Source: Wikipedia, Apple (description, specifications)

iPad (Generation 7, Wi-Fi, 32 GB, unopened, 2019)

The Generation 7 iPad differs from previous base iPad models with its larger 10.2-inch screen at 2160×1620 (264 ppi) (the Generation 6 iPad had a 9.7-inch screen) and the addition of the Smart Connector. The Smart Connector allows this iPad to use an Apple Smart Keyboard. This iPad was available in three colors: white front with a gold back, white front with silver back, and black front with a Space Gray back. This example is Space Gray.

The Generation 7 iPad uses the Apple A10 Fusion processor with 3 GB of RAM, and has 32 GB or 128 GB of internal storage. It also has an 8 Megapixel iSight camera on the back (1080p) and a 1.2 Megapixel FaceTime camera (720p) on the front. Wireless connectivity includes 802.11ac Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.2,. Its two wired ports are the Lightning port and a 3.5mm audio port. Internal sensors include accelerometer, gyroscope, ambient light sensor, compass, and barometer.

Aside from this Wi-Fi model, three Wi-Fi/Cellular models are available (US/CA, Global, and China).

Source: EveryMac

iPad mini (original, Wi-Fi, 16 GB, silver, unopened, 2012)

The original iPad mini featured a 7.9-inch screen at 1024×768 (163 ppi). Internally, it had a dual core 1 GHz Apple A5 processor; 512 MB of RAM; and 16, 32, or 64 GB of storage. It had two cameras: a rear-mounted 5 megapixel iSight camera (1080p) and a front-mounted 1.2 megapixel FaceTime HD camera (720p). The original iPad mini used a Lightning port.

I kept my original iPad mini in my daily backpack for a very long time due to its near perfect size and weight as a truly mobile device with the same 1024×768 screen as a standard iPad of the time (just with smaller pixels). I purchased this additional iPad mini as an example for my collection and never unboxed it. This version has a silver back and white front. 

Source: EveryMac 

iPad Case (for Original iPad, 2010)

This iPad Case was the only case made by Apple upon release of the original iPad in 2010. Like the iPhone case market, iPad cases became—and continue to be—a major business for both Apple and third-party manufacturers. Then and now, Apple’s case offerings vary in reviewer reception.

This original iPad Case was described by iLounge as a design in the middle of the pack. Specifically they state, “Using a protective lid…that folds around the back to become a prop-up video stand, the case is made from vinyl-like PVC plastic and has a microfiber interior. It’s designed to provide access to the device’s side buttons, headphone port…exposing the screen when you want to flip the lid open.” iLounge also correctly points out that the material “gathers marks and dirt in ways that no other case does, and the flip-closed front isn’t secured to the rest of the case in any way.”

This case, despite my best efforts at cleaning it, indeed suffers from marks that could not be removed. However, the original iPad that it was protecting was in perfect condition, thus speaking to its effectiveness at protecting the device.

The iLounge reviewer likes the case’s ability to fold and become a stand for viewing video. Interestingly, the reviewer overlooks the case’s ability to be flipped and set at a lower angle to make typing easier. This oversight is not unusual for 2010 when the iPad was often viewed only as a content consumption device, rather than acknowledging that it could also be used effectively for content creation.

Source: iLounge