Apple Collection

I began collecting Apple computers, accessories, and collectibles in the 1990s. When iPod, iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch devices were introduced, I began to collect those items as well. About twenty-five years later, I have an extensive collection of all things Apple.

Beginning in late 2018, I began to document and catalog my collection. I use a Nikon D3500 (with 18–35mm lens) and an inexpensive lighting setup. Each blog entry includes basic information, occasional personal commentary, and photos of the item(s).

iPhone 6/6s Silicone Case [(PRODUCT)RED, 2014]

The iPhone 6 Silicone Case fit both the iPhone 6 and 6s, it featured contoured silicone buttons over the volume and Sleep/Wake buttons, and a microfiber lining.

This case was available in a variety of colors, including Mint, Lavender, Turquoise, Antique White, Roal Blue, Apricot, Light Pink, Midnight Blue, Charcoal Gray, Stone, Orange, Blue, Pink Sand, White, Yellow, and (PRODUCT)RED.

This example is in (PRODUCT)RED. As of 2020, Apple reports, “For 13 years, supporters of our partnership with (RED) have raised more than $220 million in funding for HIV/AIDS programs. Every (PRODUCT)RED purchase gets us closer to ending AIDS.”

Source: Apple

iSight Accessory Kit (2003)

The iSight Accessory Kit included three mounting stands, three FireWire cable adapters, and a FireWire cable. This model number, M9314G/A, was the first version of the kit. A similar kit with different packaging was introduced later with model number M9314G/B.

Each of the three mounting stands were designed for different purposes and included a laptop clip and two bases with adhesive bottoms—one mounted horizontally and the other mounted vertically. The three FireWire cable adapters were identical and used a base with a very strong magnet that was designed to sit on top the iMac display at the time. (The iMac included a metal plate under the top center of the display to accept the magnet.)

The additional thin FireWire cable allowed an accessory base to remain attached while the iSight Camera could be unplugged and transported in a clear plastic cylinder that shipped with the iSight Camera.

Source: Apple

Cloth (for iMac Core 2 Duo, 2007)

Beginning in the mid-2000s, some iMac models shipped with an “official” cleaning cloth that was referenced in the iMac manual:

“Cleaning Your iMac Display. Use the cloth that came with your iMac to clean the display… Dampen the cloth that came with your iMac, or another clean, soft, lint-free cloth, with water only and wipe the screen. Do not spray liquid directly on the screen.”

This version of the cleaning cloth is black microfiber with an Apple logo embossed in the center edge of one side. The packaging places the embossed Apple logo in the corner due to the manner in which the cloth is folded in its clear envelope-style package.

Source: Apple

iPhone Bluetooth Headset cable (A1221, 2007)

The iPhone Bluetooth Headset cable is a unique 30-pin USB charging cable with an additional, offset magnetic charging port to accommodate the iPhone Bluetooth Headset. This allowed iPhone Bluetooth Headset users to charge both the original iPhone and the iPhone Bluetooth Headset from the same cable at the same time.

Source: Apple

Apple keyboard extension cable (2008)

Shortly after Apple began including USB keyboards with tower computers, they have included a USB extension cable in the box in the event the user wished to place the tower under a desk or otherwise far way from the keyboard. The extender is APple’s way of dealing with their notoriously short keyboard cables. The User’s Guide for the 2008 Mac Pro pictures this keyboard extension cable design and states: “If the keyboard cable isn’t long enough, use the keyboard extension cable that came with your Mac Pro.”

Apple has also followed a convention of placing a notch in their USB keyboard extenders. This notch matches a slot in the USB plug present in all Apple keyboards, thus allowing an Apple USB keyboard to be plugged into any standard USB port, but preventing the Apple keyboard extension cable to be used with anything except Apple USB keyboards with the slot in the USB plug.

Source: Apple

Apple Lockable Cable Fastener (unopened, 2001)

The Apple Lockable Cable Fastener is a metal clip with a hole meant to function as a security device. To use the fastener, several cables would be bundled in the clip and a padlock would be fed through the holes so the device cables and devices (mouse, keyboard, speakers, etc.) could not be easily removed and stolen.

One illustration on the manual shows an Apple Pro Keyboard, Apple Pro Mouse, and the speakers that shipped with the G4 Cube (2001). Thus, this Lockable Cable Fastener likely shipped with a G4 Cube.

Source: Apple

Mini-DVI to DVI Adapter (DVI-D) (M9321G/B, 2005)

Beginning in 2005, Apple released several computers with a Mini-DVI port, including the 12-inch PowerBook G4, Intel-based iMac, the MacBook Intel-based laptop, the Intel-based Xserve, the 2009 Mac mini, and some late model eMacs.

The port was only used until 2008 when it was replaced with the Mini DisplayPort. The port is used instead of a full-size DVI connector to save physical space while allowing the computer to be connected to a DVI-D display.

Sources: EveryMac, B&H Photo Video, Wikipedia

Apple DVI-D Male to DVI-D Female Cable Adapter (603-8471, 2006)

When the original Mac Pro was released in 2006, it included two side-by-side DVI-D connectors (Digital Visual Interface) on the back so two DVI displays could be connected at the same time.

Since the ports were close together, Apple shipped this DVI-D Male to DVI-D Female Cable Adapter in the event that the cable interface of the display was too wide to fit the connectors from both displays. The adapter’s function is to extend the port an extra six inches from the computer.

Sources: Apple (via B&H Photo Video), macofalltrades

100 Apple Devices on Instagram Concludes

About 100 days ago on December 13, 2019, I started an Instagram series called 100 Apple Devices. The series consisted of one post per day of an Apple device for 100 days, posted chronologically. Each post was an original photo, and the first comment included the name of the device, a minimal (and parenthetical) amount of clarifying information, and the number in my series. For example:

Macintosh (original, 1984). 100 Apple Devices, Number 1

For the purposes of my posts, I defined an “Apple Device” as a physical object made by Apple that is self-powered and functions on its own to fulfill a particular purpose, without major dependencies on other equipment. Further, the devices I included have at least one independent power supply (AC power and/or battery) and a processor. With this definition, I considered computers, laptops, displays, music players, phones, speaker systems, and watches as “devices.”

Since I was asked more than once—yes—I own all of these devices, and I captured all the photos in the series. I began documenting my collection back in 2018 and these are photos from my Apple Collection blog. While my blog contains several photos of each device in a single blog entry, my Instagram series features just one representative photo of each selected device.

In this post, I wish to present a final image of all 100 Apple Devices in a high-resolution portrait. I offer this image under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

You may also download the original image (24 x 24 inches at 200 dpi resolution, 8MB). Feel free to print and display it if you wish!

So what’s next? Beginning tomorrow, I will present 100 Apple Accessories on Instagram!

What’s the difference between a device and an accessory, you might ask? My definition of an “Apple Accessory” is a physical object made by Apple that is dependent upon another device to fulfill its purpose. Without spoiling too many surprises, one example of an Apple Accessory is the Apple USB mouse (1998)—it is a classic Apple design and it requires a computer to fulfill its purpose. Like the Apple USB mouse, most accessories will not have a power source or processor (although there may be a few exceptions).

Since some of my Apple Accessories are obscure, I will also include a description with each item in the series. I will begin the series of accessories in 1984 with the release of the original Macintosh.

Finally, here is the complete list of the previous 100 Apple Devices series with the date the device was posted on Instagram:

  1. Macintosh (original, 1984). 100 Apple Devices, Number 1 – 12-13-19
  2. Macintosh SE/30 (1989). 100 Apple Devices, Number 2 – 12-14-19
  3. Macintosh Classic (1990). 100 Apple Devices, Number 3 – 12-16-19
  4. PowerBook 140 (1991). 100 Apple Devices, Number 4 – 12-17-19
  5. PowerBook 180 (1992). 100 Apple Devices, Number 5 – 12-18-19
  6. Macintosh Performa 200 (1992). 100 Apple Devices, Number 6 – 12-19-19
  7. Macintosh TV (1993). 100 Apple Devices, Number 7 – 12-20-19
  8. PowerCD (1993). 100 Apple Devices, Number 8 – 12-21-19
  9. PowerBook 165c (1993). 100 Apple Devices, Number 9 – 12-22-19
  10. Macintosh Color Classic (1993). 100 Apple Devices, Number 10 – 12-23-19
  11. AppleDesign Powered Speakers (1993). 100 Apple Devices, Number 11 – 12-24-19
  12. AppleDesign Powered Speakers II (1993). 100 Apple Devices, Number 12 – 12-25-19
  13. PowerBook 520 (1994). 100 Apple Devices, Number 13 – 12-26-19
  14. PowerBook 520c (1994). 100 Apple Devices, Number 14 – 12-27-19
  15. QuickTake 150 (1995). 100 Apple Devices, Number 15 – 12-28-19
  16. PowerBook 540 (1994). 100 Apple Devices, Number 16 – 12-29-19
  17. PowerBook 1400c/117 (1996). 100 Apple Devices, Number 17 – 12-30-19
  18. PowerBook 3400c/200 (1997). 100 Apple Devices, Number 18 – 12-31-19
  19. PowerBook 1400cs/133 (1997). 100 Apple Devices, Number 19 – 1-1-20
  20. eMate 300 (1997). 100 Apple Devices, Number 20 – 1-2-19
  21. Twentieth Anniversary Macintosh (1997). 100 Apple Devices, Number 21 – 1-3-20
  22. PowerBook G3 Series (233 MHz, “Wallstreet,” 1998). 100 Apple Devices, Number 22 – 1-4-20
  23. Studio Display (original, graphite, 1998). 100 Apple Devices, Number 23 – 1-5-20
  24. iMac G3/233 (original, Bondi blue, 1998). 100 Apple Devices, Number 24 – 1-6-20
  25. iMac G3/333 (blueberry, 1999). 100 Apple Devices, Number 25 – 1-7-19
  26. iBook G3/300 (original, blueberry, 1999). 100 Apple Devices, Number 26 – 1-8-19
  27. iBook G3/300 (original, tangerine, 1999). 100 Apple Devices, Number 27 – 1-9-20
  28. AirPort Base Station (original, 1999). 100 Apple Devices, Number 28 – 1-10-20
  29. PowerBook G3 (400 MHz, “Lombard,” 1999). 100 Apple Devices, Number 29 – 1-11-20
  30. iMac G3/266 (grape, 1999). 100 Apple Devices, Number 30 – 1-12-20
  31. iMac G3/333 (strawberry, 1999). 100 Apple Devices, Number 31 – 1-13-20
  32. iBook G3/366 SE (graphite, 2000). 100 Apple Devices, Number 32 – 1-14-20
  33. iBook G3/366 (indigo, 2000). 100 Apple Devices, Number 33 – 1-15-20
  34. iBook G3/366 (key lime, 2000). 100 Apple Devices, Number 34 – 1-16-20
  35. PowerBook G3 (500 MHz, Pismo, 2000). 100 Apple Devices, Number 35 – 1-17-20
  36. iMac G3/350 (indigo, Summer 2000). 100 Apple Devices, Number 36 – 1-18-20
  37. iMac G3/500 DV SE (graphite, Summer 2000). 100 Apple Devices, Number 37 – 1-19-20
  38. Power Mac G4 Cube (450 MHz, 2000). 100 Apple Devices, Number 38 1-20-20
  39. iPod (original, 2001). 100 Apple Devices, Number 39 – 1-21-20
  40. iMac G3/600 (snow, Summer 2001). 100 Apple Devices, Number 40 – 1-23-20
  41. iBook G3/500 (Dual USB, translucent white, 2001). 100 Apple Devices, Number 41 – 1-24-20
  42. iPod (Generation 2, 2002). 100 Apple Devices, Number 42 – 1-25-20
  43. iMac G4/700 (15-inch, flat panel, 2002). 100 Apple Devices, Number 43 – 1-26-20
  44. eMac (2003). 100 Apple Devices, Number 44
  45. iBook G3/900 (Early 2003). 100 Apple Devices, Number 45
  46. PowerBook G4 (1.33 GHz, 17-inch, 2003). 100 Apple Devices, Number 46 – 1-29-20
  47. iMac G4/1.25 (20-inch, 2003). 100 Apple Devices, Number 47 – 1-30-20
  48. AirPort Extreme Base Station (original, 2003). 100 Apple Devices, Number 48 – 1-31-20
  49. iPod (Generation 3, 40 GB, 2004). 100 Apple Devices, Number 49 – 2-1-20
  50. iPod U2 Special Edition (Generation 4, 20 GB, 2004). 100 Apple Devices, Number 50 – 2-2-20
  51. PowerBook G4 (1.33 GHz, 12-inch, 2004). 100 Apple Devices, Number 51 – 2-3-20
  52. iPod shuffle (original, 512 MB, 2005). 100 Apple Devices, Number 52 – 2-4-20
  53. iPod nano (original, 4 GB, white, 2005). 100 Apple Devices, Number 53 – 2-5-20
  54. iMac G5 (2.0 GHz, 20-inch, 2005). 100 Apple Devices, Number 54 – 2-6-20
  55. Mac mini G4 (2005). 100 Apple Devices, Number 55 – 2-7-20
  56. iBook G4 (Mid-2005). 100 Apple Devices, Number 56
  57. iPod nano (Generation 2, 4 GB, green, 2006). 100 Apple Devices, Number 57 – 2-9-20
  58. iPod Hi-Fi (2006). 100 Apple Devices, Number 58 – 2-10-20
  59. iPod nano (Generation 2, 8 GB, black, 2006). 100 Apple Devices, Number 59 – 2-11-20
  60. iMac (Core 2 Duo, 2.0 GHz, 17-inch, 2006). 100 Apple Devices, Number 60 – 2-12-20
  61. iPod shuffle (Generation 2, 1 GB, orange, 2007). 100 Apple Devices, Number 61 – 2-13-20
  62. iPod nano (Generation 3, 8 GB, red, 2007). 100 Apple Devices, Number 62 – 2-14-20
  63. iPhone (original, 16 GB, 2007). 100 Apple Devices, Number 63 – 2-15-20
  64. iPod classic (Generation 6, 80 GB, black, 2007). 100 Apple Devices, Number 64 – 2-16-20
  65. Mac mini (Core 2 Duo, 2007). 100 Apple Devices, Number 65 – 2-17-20
  66. iMac (Core 2 Duo, 20-inch, 2007). 100 Apple Devices, Number 66 – 2-18-20
  67. AirPort Extreme Base Station (Generation 2, 2007). 100 Apple Devices, Number 67 – 2-19-20
  68. iPhone 3G (16 GB, 2008). 100 Apple Devices, Number 68 – 2-20-20
  69. MacBook (black, 2008). 100 Apple Devices, Number 69 – 2-21-20
  70. iPod touch (Generation 2, 8 GB, 2008). 100 Apple Devices, Number 70 – 2-22-20
  71. iPod nano (Generation 4, 8 GB, blue, 2008). 100 Apple Devices, Number 71 – 2-23-20
  72. iPod classic (Generation 7, 120 GB, silver, Late 2008). 100 Apple Devices, Number 72 – 2-24-20
  73. iPod nano (Generation 5, 16 GB, blue, 2009). 100 Apple Devices, Number 73 – 2-25-20
  74. iPhone 3GS (16 GB, black, 2009). 100 Apple Devices, Number 74 – 2-26-20
  75. MacBook (white, 2009). 100 Apple Devices, Number 75 – 2-27-20
  76. iPod shuffle (Generation 3, 4 GB, stainless steel, 2009). 100 Apple Devices, Number 76 – 2-28-20
  77. iMac (Core 2 Duo, 24-inch, 2009). 100 Apple Devices, Number 77 – 2-29-20
  78. iPod shuffle (Generation 4, 2 GB, blue, 2010). 100 Apple Devices, Number 78 – 3-1-20
  79. iPod nano (Generation 6, 8 GB, 2010). 100 Apple Devices, Number 79 – 3-2-20
  80. iPhone 4 (2010). 100 Apple Devices, Number 80 – 3-3-20
  81. iPad (original, 3G, 16 GB, 2010). 100 Apple Devices, Number 81 – 3-4-20
  82. Apple TV (Generation 2, 2010). 100 Apple Devices, Number 82 – 3-5-20
  83. iPhone 4s (white, 2011). 100 Apple Devices, Number 83 – 3-6-20
  84. iPhone 5 (2012). 100 Apple Devices, Number 84 – 3-7-20
  85. iPad mini (original, Wi-Fi ,16 GB, space gray, 2012). 100 Apple Devices, Number 85 – 3-8-20
  86. iPad (Generation 3, cellular, 32 GB, white, 2012). 100 Apple Devices, Number 86 – 3-9-20
  87. AirPort Express (802.11n, Generation 2, 2012). 100 Apple Devices, Number 87 – 3-10-20
  88. iPad mini (Generation 2, 16 GB, black, 2013). 100 Apple Devices, Number 88 – 3-11-20
  89. MacBook Air (13-inch, Mid-2013). 100 Apple Devices, Number 89 – 3-12-20
  90. iPhone 6 (64 GB, space gray, 2014). 100 Apple Devices, Number 90 – 3-13-20
  91. Mac mini (Late 2014). 100 Apple Devices, Number 91 – 3-14-20
  92. MacBook Air (11-inch, 2014). 100 Apple Devices, Number 92 – 3-15-20
  93. Apple Watch (original, 42 mm, silver stainless steel case, black leather loop band, 2015). 100 Apple Devices, Number 93 – 3-16-20
  94. iPad Pro (12.9-inch, Wi-Fi 2015). 100 Apple Devices, Number 94 – 3-18-20
  95. iPhone 7 Plus (128 GB, jet black, 2016). 100 Apple Devices, Number 95 – 3-19-20
  96. Apple Watch (Series 1, 42 mm, silver aluminum case, white sport band, 2016). 100 Apple Devices, Number 96 – 3-20-20
  97. Apple Watch (Series 2, Nike+, 42 mm, Space Gray aluminum case, Midnight Blue Leather Loop, 2016). 100 Apple Devices, Number 97 – 3-21-20
  98. Apple Watch (Series 3, Nike+, 42 mm, silver aluminum case, bright crimson/black Nike sport band, 2017). 100 Apple Devices, Number 98 – 3-22-20
  99. HomePod (white, 2017). 100 Apple Devices, Number 99 – 3-23-20
  100. Apple Watch (Series 4, cellular, 44 mm, stainless steel case, white sport band, 2018). 100 Apple Devices, Number 100 – 3-24-20

I hope you will join me tomorrow when I begin my presentation of 100 Apple Accessories on Instagram.

MagSafe to MagSafe 2 Converter (2012)

According to Apple, the MagSafe to MagSafe 2 Converter allowed you to “use the MagSafe connector on your LED Cinema Display, Thunderbolt Display, or MagSafe Power Adapter to charge your MagSafe 2-equipped Mac computer.”

Essentially, this adapter helped to bridge the gap to allow original MagSafe power-equipped devices (2006–2012) to be used after Apple changed to a new MagSafe 2 (2012–2019) standard in 2012.

MagSafe was an Apple technology that allowed power cords (primarily on laptops, but also used on some displays) to provide power using a magnetically attached cord. The technology was extremely effective in preventing damage because if a user would, for example, trip over a laptop power cord or forget their device was plugged in, the magnet would pull out of the socket without damaging the device.

Devices that used this adapter included: 24-inch Apple LED Cinema Display, 27-inch Apple LED Cinema Display, Apple Thunderbolt Display, Apple 45W MagSafe Power Adapter, Apple 85W MagSafe Power Adapter, MacBook Pro with Retina display, and MacBook Air with MagSafe 2 power port.

Source: Wikipedia, Apple