Apple Collection

I began collecting Apple computers, accessories, and collectibles in the 1990s. When iPod, iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch devices were introduced, I began to collect those items as well. About twenty-five years later, I have an extensive collection of all things Apple.

Beginning in late 2018, I began to document and catalog my collection. I use a Nikon D3500 (with 18–35mm lens) and an inexpensive lighting setup. Each blog entry includes basic information, occasional personal commentary, and photos of the item(s).

Mac OS X Server box (2003)

This box is the retail packaging for Mac OS X Server, Version 10.3 Panther. The artwork on the box changed considerably from the previous Jaguar-fur-covered X in Apple Garamond to a new, more blocky serif font with a metallic finish.

This version was released on October 24, 2003, and added LDAP-based Open Directory user and file management.

A new Workgroup Manager application allowed for a vast improvement for configuration. Other network services were added or improved including SNMP, Apache web server, mail server, OpenLDAP, AFP, print server, SMB version 3 (improved Windows compatibility), MySQL (4.0.16), and PHP (4.3.7).

The box indicates that it contains Mac OS X Server v10.3, Admin Tools, Xcode, getting started guide, electronic documentation.

Source: Wikipedia (Panther, Mac OS X Server)

Mac OS X Tiger 10.4.6 (2005)

The version of Mac OS X Tiger, Version 10.4.6, specifies that this version has over 200 new features and mentions “Spotlight search technology, Dashboard widgets, Safari RSS web news, iChat AV… [and] H.264 Quicktime [sic] video.”

Since this is not the initial release of Mac OS X Tiger, it is packaged in a designed software sleeve—not in a retail box.

Source: Wikipedia

Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard box (2007)

This is the retail box for Mac OS X Leopard, Version 10.5. Although the OS features the codename “Leopard,” Apple instead chose to use a metallic print idea highlighting a space theme (echoing a new space-themed wallpaper included with the release) for the artwork.

The box highlights five new features of apps and services in the OS:

  • Finder—See your files in Cover Flow.
  • Spaces—Organize your windows.
  • Time Machine—Automatic backup.
  • Mail—Stylish email stationery.
  • iChat—Add effects to video chat.

Apple described this update as “the largest update of Mac OS X” with over 300 new features. Leopard was also the first Mac OS X version to drop support for the Classic Environment that allowed users to run Mac OS 9 “Classic” apps within Mac OS X.

Source: Wikipedia

Mac OS X Server 10.6 box (2011)

The Mac OS X Server Version 10.6 Snow Leopard Server retail box was white and used a photo of a snow leopard as the front box art.

Its tagline, shown on the back of the box, was: “More power to your business. Communicate, collaborate, and share with Snow Leopard Server.” Six featured technologies shown on the box back included:

  • Server Preferences
  • Wiki Server 2
  • Podcast Producer 2
  • iCal Server 2
  • Mail Server
  • Address Book Server

This was the first Mac OS X Server version to include Mobile Access Server to allow iPhone and Mac users to access secured network services with SSL encryption and authentication between a user’s iPhone or Mac and a private network.

Snow Leopard Server was only available in an unlimited client license and cost $499.

Source: Wikipedia

Xsan 2 box (2008)

This Xsan 2 retail box from 2008 includes the software to set up Apple’s SAN (Storage Area Network) solution on a Mac with a G5 processor with an Apple Fibre Channel card running Mac OS X or Mac OS X Server 10.5 or later.

The box uses the tagline, “Share terabytes of storage. Zero bottlenecks.”

The four key technologies highlighted on the box include:

  • Simplified setup
  • MultiSAN
  • Full-throttle performance
  • Spotlight

The Xsan 2 setup guide is not for the faint of heart. It lists “Equipment You’ll Need” and specifies, “To set up a SAN using the instructions in this guide, you need:”

  • RAID storage devices for SAN storage
  • Two computers running Mac OS X Server v10.5 to act as SAN metadata controllers
  • One or more SAN client computers running Mac OS X v10.5 or Mac OS X Server v10.5
  • An Intel or PowerPC G5 processor and at least 2 GB of RAM in each SAN computer
  • An additional 2 GB per SAN volume in each metadata controller that hosts more
  • than one SAN volume
  • An Apple Fibre Channel PCI, PCI-X, or PCI-E card installed in each SAN computer
  • A Fibre Channel switch and cables for all storage devices and computers
  • An Ethernet switch and cables for the private SAN metadata network
  • A second Ethernet switch and cables for public intranet and Internet access
  • An equipment rack for your RAID storage systems and Xserve computers
  • A list of qualified RAID systems and Fibre Channel switches is available on the Xsan website at www.apple.com/xsan

Source: Apple

Resource Library CDs (1999)

This 2-CD set from May 1999 is titled The Apple Sales and Marketing Resource Library, Provider Edition.

CD 1 contains:
PowerSales May 1999
Apple Load Ad Slicks
ColorSync White Paper
Final Cut DataSheet & FAQ
QuickTime 4.0 Data & Fact Sheet
Mac OS X Server Data Sheet & FAQ
Mac OS X Server Presentation
Mac Products Guide 04.99
Mac OS Promos

CD 2 contains:
Mac OS X Server Training

The CDs also include, “See insert for complete listing,” indicating that a CD insert was also printed, but it is not included in my collection.

QuickTime VR Authoring Studio box (1997)

This QuickTime VR Authoring Studio retail software box from 1997 provided a CD and manual for Apple’s QuickTime VR Authoring Studio software.

According to Apple, “Apple® QuickTime® VR Authoring Studio software lets you create interactive virtual-reality scenes with point-and-click simplicity. It takes full advantage of the intuitive Mac® OS interface to help you easily turn photos and computer renderings into attention-getting 360-degree views. QuickTime VR Authoring Studio is a powerful one-stop solution for producing all kinds of QuickTime VR content.”

In addition, “QuickTime VR supports 360-degree views called panoramic movies, as well as object movies that allow users to view an object from all sides. Both objects and panoramas can be fully interactive, with zooming, animation, and hot spots linked to other multimedia objects.”

The software was very intuitive to use and allowed easy creation of Virtual Reality content as early as 1997.

Source: Macintosh Garden

QuickTime 4.1 CD (2000)

This QuickTime 4 CD contains QuickTime 4.1 installers for Macintosh and Windows.

The CD cover states:

  • Install QuickTime 4.1 and experience QuickTime for yourself as you interact with the demo movie included on the CD.
  • Control your media experience with the intuitive QuickTime Player.
  • Open just about any media file you come across.
  • Watch live content over the Internet.
  • Upgrade to QuickTime Pro so you can edit and save your own movies.

QuickTime 4.1 was released on December 17, 1999. The release provided support for files larger than 2.0 GB in Mac OS 9, added variable bit rate (VBR) support for MP3 audio, and removed support for older 68k Macintosh systems.

Source: Wikipedia

Newton Press box (1995)

Newton Press was a software application for the Newton, Apple’s handheld Personal Digital Assistant. On a two-page MessagePad Accessories sheet, Newton Press is described:

Newton Press
This easy-to-use software allows you to publish electronic documents such as travel itineraries, reference books, or sales charts on your personal computer for viewing and annotating on your MessagePad.

The box states:

“Create documents on your desktop computer, then publish them as Newton books. Drag and drop word processing documents, graphics files, or text created on your personal computer directly to the Newton Press application for simple, one-step creation of Newton electronic reference books. Or use the formatting capabilities to format your books, create tables of contents, establish paragraph links, and more. Anyone with a Newton personal digital assistant (PDA) can view, annotate, fax, or print the books you create.”

This copy of Newton Press is unopened and in its original shrink wrap.

Source: Apple