Apple Collection

I began collecting Apple computers in the late 1990s when I couldn’t part with my PowerBook 1400c after I upgraded to a PowerBook G3. Since I appreciate Apple design, I also collected posters, advertisements, and various logo items over the years. When iPod, iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch devices were released, it seemed logical to collect those items as well. More than twenty years later, I have an extensive collection of all things Apple.

I have always done my best to artfully display my collection in my home over the years without making my house look like a warehouse. I’m to the point where most would agree that my theme is mostly Apple, but I still make the attempt to make the display tasteful. Many of my friends refer to my house as an Apple Museum. I don’t (and can’t) disagree.

Beginning in late 2018, I decided to start an official catalog of my collection. My goal is simple: document at least one item per week and post it on my Apple Collection blog here on mattjfuller.com. I’m using a Nikon D3500 (with 18–35mm lens) and an inexpensive lighting setup. Each blog entry is planned to include some basic information, occasional personal commentary, and photos of the item(s). I’m new to this kind of photography so please bear with me as I learn the process.

iPod classic (Generation 7, 120 GB, silver, 2008)

This Late 2018 iPod classic was very similar to the previous Generation 6 model. This iPod was available in 120 GB or 160 GB capacities, had a 2.5-inch color LCD display (320×240, 163 ppi), and was available with a black or silver anodized aluminum front and a chrome stainless steel back. This model is the third generation of the iPod classic.

The software included a Cover Flow option for selecting albums with three games bundled, including iQuiz, Klondike, and Vortex.

Source: EveryMac.com

AirPort Express 802.11n (Generation 2, 2012)

The AirPort Express Generation 2 functioned as a wireless access point, to extend the range of a network, as an Ethernet-to-wireless bridge, as a print server, and/or as an audio server. This model allowed up to 50 networked users using the 802.11a/n Wi-Fi standard.

Connectors included an audio connector that combined a 3.5 mm minijack socket and a mini-TOSLINK optical digital connection. On August 28, 2018, AirPlay 2 support was added to the Generation 2 AirPort Express, giving it features similar to HomePod.

Source: Wikipedia

MacBook Air 11-inch (2014)

This MacBook Air 11-inch featured a 22-nm Haswell 1.4 GHz Intel Core i5 processor. It included 4 GB or 8 GB of memory and 128 GB or 256 GB of flash storage. This was the smallest of Apple’s MacBook Air line of laptops measuring 0.11 to 0.68 inches and weighed 2.3 pounds. It included a 720p FaceTime HD webcam, a backlit full-size keyboard, and an 11.6-inch widescreen TFT LED backlit active-matrix glossy display (1366×768).

Wireless connectivity included 802.11ac Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.0, while ports included analog audio out, one Thunderbolt port, and two USB 3.0 ports.

A previous version of the MacBook Air 11-inch nearly identical except for a slower processor and less available RAM and flash storage.

In my role as Assistant Superintendent for Technology & Innovation, I led the teams that managed nearly 4,500 of these laptops over a five-year period (2014–19). At the time, all high school students in the school district were issued a MacBook Air 11-inch and students used the same model for their 4-year high school career. Apple stopped manufacturing this laptop in 2018 and the high school switched to the iPad Generation 6.

Source: EveryMac.com

EarPods (with 3.5 mm Headphone Plug)

The EarPods design replaced a previous Apple headphone design with a circular earphone design. The product description states that, “Unlike traditional, circular earbuds, the design of the EarPods is defined by the geometry of the ear. Which makes them more comfortable for more people than any other earbud-style headphones.”

EarPods also included a remote and microphone on the right EarPod wire. The remote allowed the user to pinch the thickened cord to control volume, play/pause music and video, and answer or end a call.

The same wired EarPod design was used in the EarPods with Lightning Connector product when Apple removed the audio connector from the iPhone. Both the 3.5 mm Headphone Plug and Lightning Connector options were sold at the same time since both ports were still used in Apple products.

This product was sold in a variety of packaging. This is the same packaging that shipped inside iPhone models and also available as OEM replacement parts from some online retailers.

Source: Apple.com

Nike+iPod Sport Kit (2006)

The Nike+iPod Sport Kit was announced on May 23, 2006. A press released stated, “Nike and Apple today announced a partnership bringing the worlds of sports and music together like never before with the launch of innovative Nike+iPod products.” The two-piece wireless system included an oval sensor that was placed inside a Nike+ shoe and a 30-pin plug for the iPod nano.

Software on the iPod nano would connect to custom Nike+ footwear or any shoe with the Nike+iPod sensor attached and provided information on time, distance, calories burned, and pace on the iPod screen. In addition, “A new Nike Sport Music section on the iTunes Music Store and a new nikeplus.com personal service site help maximize the Nike+iPod experience.”

This kit was sold for $29 and included an in-shoe sensor and a receiver that attached to iPod.

Source: Apple.com

AppleDesign Powered Speakers (1993)

According to the User’s Guide, “AppleDesign Powered Speakers are the first powered speakers designed by a computer company specifically for use with a personal computer.” The guide goes on to explain that the speakers provide CD-quality sound from both the CD-ROM drive and the computer at the same time. The setup includes both a main speaker and a “satellite speaker.”

The two speakers are meant to be connected by an included speaker wire. The main speaker includes a Subwoofer output jack that allows a non-Apple powered (2 volts peak to peak) subwoofer to be connected.

The maximum sound output is listed at 90 dB at 0.5 meters and 90 Hz. The dimensions are 9.25 x 4.5 x 4.25 inches.

These AppleDesign Powered Speakers represent the first in my full collection of all of Apple’s standalone powered speakers. These speakers were followed by the AppleDesign Powered Speakers II, the iPod Hi-Fi, and eventually the HomePod. The only Apple powered speakers I do not currently own are the rare black AppleDesign Powered Speakers II.

Source: MacintoshRepository.org

iPhone 4S (2011)

The iPhone 4S was the product that first introduced the Siri voice assistant. The iPhone 4S was designed around a stainless-steel body with a glass front and back. It had a 3.5-inch LED-backlit 960×640 326 ppi multi-touch Retina display and included two noise-cancelling microphones. It was available in black or white.

The iPhone 4S supported both GSM and CDMA networks and included 802.11b/g/n and Bluetooth 4.0. It used a dual-core Apple A5 processor; 512 MB of RAM; and 8 GB, 16 GB, 32 GB, or 64 GB of internal storage. It had two cameras: an 8 megapixel HD camera (1080p at 30 FPS) with an LED flash on the rear and FaceTime camera on the front that allowed FaceTime video calls over Wi-Fi.

Source: EveryMac.com

iBook G3/500 (Dual USB, 2001)

The iBook G3/500 featured a 500 MHz PowerPC 750cx (G3) processor; 64 MB or 128 MB of RAM; a 10.0 GB Ultra ATA hard drive; a tray-loading CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, CD-RW, or DVD-ROM/CD-RW Combo drive; and optional AirPort (802.11b) card. The screen was a 12.1-inch TFT XGA active matrix display (1024×768). The case of the laptop was translucent white (a similar later model used an opaque white case).

This iBook replaced the previous iBook models that were much larger and came in one of five colors (including blueberry, tangerine, graphite, indigo, and key lime).

EveryMac.com reports that four versions of this laptop were available: 64 MB RAM with CD-ROM drive ($1299); 128 MB RAM with DVD-ROM drive ($1499), 128 MB RAM with CD-RW drive ($1599); and 128 MB RAM with DVD-ROM/CD-RW Combo drive (build-to-order direct from Apple, $1799).

Source: EveryMac.com

Siri Remote (2015)

The Siri Remote was released in 2015 along with the Apple TV Generation 4. This remote had a glass trackpad, two microphones, and five buttons. The buttons included Menu, Home, Siri, Play/Pause, and a combined Volume up/down button. This remote used both IR and Bluetooth to connect to the Apple TV. The remote also included two sensors for gaming, an accelerometer and a gyroscope.

The finishes of the remote included a matte finish on the trackpad and a smooth, glossy finish at the bottom. The textured finishes helped differentiate the orientation of the remote when using it in the dark or by touch.

The trackpad on the Siri Remote supported limited gestures, including swipe, click, and tap.

Unlike earlier Apple Remotes, the Siri Remote used a built-in rechargeable Lithium Polymer Battery that charged using a Lightning port at the bottom.

The design of this remote was slightly revised after initial production. The original design had a solid black Menu button. The revised design added a white raised ring around the the Menu button.

References: Wikipedia.com, Apple Developer