Think different. educator poster set (11 x 17 inches, 2000)

“Think different” was the slogan used by Apple in advertising 1997–2002, and is still used in some circumstances as of 2021. The “Think different” concept was created by advertising agency TBWA\Chiat\Day while working with Apple and Steve Jobs. “Think different” was used in its original concept in a TV commercial and in print/digital advertisements, and the “Think different” slogan was used as part of many TV commercials, print/digital ads, and on product packaging.

This advertising campaign was notable in that its original concept did not feature any Apple products. The original version began with a “manifesto” that began famously with “Here’s to the crazy ones.”

Here’s to the crazy ones.
The misfits.
The rebels.
The troublemakers.
The round pegs in the square holes.
The ones who see things differently.
They’re not fond of rules.
And they have no respect for the status quo.
You can quote them, disagree with them,
glorify or vilify them.
About the only thing you can’t do is ignore them.
Because they change things.
They push the human race forward.
While some may see them as the crazy ones,
we see genius.
Because the people who are crazy enough to think
they can change the world, are the ones who do.
Think different.

During the commercial, voiced by Richard Dreyfuss, black-and-white footage of iconic personalities (Apple referred to them later as “Apple Geniuses”) served as visuals to accompany the voiceover of the manifesto. Personalities included Albert Einstein, Bob Dylan, Martin Luther King Jr., Thomas Edison, Muhammad Ali, Ted Turner, Mahatma Gandhi, Amelia Earhart, Alfred Hitchcock, Martha Graham, Jim Henson, Pablo Picasso, and others.

The print and digital ads also did not feature Apple devices, just the Apple logo and the words “Think different.” One of the creative team who worked on the campaign described the print concept: “The rainbow-colored logo served as stark contrast to the black and white photography, and, to me, it seemed to make the ‘Think Different’ statement all the more bold.”

In 2000 this Think different poster set was provided to school leaders. The posters were 11 x 17 inches and arrived in a white box printed with the “Here’s to the crazy ones” manifesto. Each box contained three packs of posters sealed in plastic of 10 posters each.

I have two of these education sets. The one pictured was shipped directly to a high school principal. One set has been removed from its shrink wrap, and two sets are still unopened. I have a second compete set still in shrink wrap and has no shipping label.

The set also includes three 8.5 x 11 sheets inside. One is a letter from Apple, and the other two sheets include a “key” naming each Think different portrait with an adjective and mini-biography of each person’s life. The set contains the following “Apple Geniuses:”

Albert Einstein: “Questioner”
Cesar Chavez: “Laborer”
Jane Goodall: “Observer”
Pablo Picasso: “Creator”
Amelia Earhart: “Aviator”
Miles Davis: “Improviser”
Jim Henson: “Muppeteer”
John Lennon & Yoko Ono: “Dreamers”
Dr. James Watson: “Code cracker”
Mahatma Gandhi: “Leader”

Sources: Wikipedia, Forbes, Apple (documentation included in this set)

Education Resource CD Winter 2000 (2000)

This Education Resource CD is dated Winter 2000. Its design features a rendition of the glossy 3D tabs on the apple.com website at the time. The toolbox image at the bottom of the CD matched the iTools design. iTools is a precursor to what has become Apple iCloud services.

Apple CD media (2002)

My collection of Apple CD and DVD media includes operating systems, applications, software collections that shipped with devices, promotional media, diagnostic tools, and educational content. In general, Apple-branded CD or DVD examples in original packaging have been presented separately, while single discs or collections of discs are presented chronologically.

Apple CDs from 2002 include:

  • Mac OS X v10.2 Install Disc 2 (Version 10.2, 2Z691-3705-A, 2002)
  • Getting Started with Mac OS X version 10.2 Self-Paced & Practice Files (691-4118-A, 2002)
  • AppleWorks 6 Education Version [Mac OS 8.1 or later (built for Mac OS X) and Windows 95/98/Me/2000/XP, Version 6.2.4, 691-3659-A, 2002]
  • Software Bundle (603-2348-A, iBook Media, 2002)
  • iBook Mac OS 9 Install (Mac OS version 9.2.2, CD version 2.1, 691-3996-A, 2002)
  • Software Bundle (603-2787-A, iBook Media, 2002)
  • eMac OS X Install Disc 1 (Mac OS version 10.3.3, CD version 1.0, 2Z691-4926-A, 2002)
  • eMac OS X Software Restore 9 of 9 (Mac OS X applications, Classic support, CD version 1.0, 2Z691-4933-A, 2002)
  • Software Bundle (603-5097, eMac Media, 2002)

Apple shipped CD bundles in cardboard envelope packages in 2002. Since each computer required a different number of CDs, various envelope sizes were used to accommodate the number of CDs. A white envelope with a light gray Apple logo is used in this example.

Apple CD and DVD media (2003)

My collection of Apple CD and DVD media includes operating systems, applications, software collections that shipped with devices, promotional media, diagnostic tools, and educational content. In general, Apple-branded CD or DVD examples in original packaging have been presented separately, while single discs or collections of discs are presented chronologically.

Apple CDs and DVDs from 2003 include:

  • iBook Mac OS X Install Disc 1 (Mac OS version 10.2.3, CD version 1.0, 2Z691-4282-A, 2003)
  • AppleWorks 6 Education Version (Mac OS X, Mac OS 8.1 or later, Windows 95/98/Me/2000/XP, Version 6.2.7, 691-4415-A, 2003)
  • .Mac (Version 2.0, 0Z691-4421-A, 2003)
  • iTunes 4 Installer CD with QuickTime 6.2 (Built for Mac OS X v10.1.5 or later, 2003)
  • iTunes 3, iPhoto 2, iMovie 3, iDVD 3 Install DVD For systems with a SuperDrive (Version 1.0, 2Z691-4302-A, 2003)
  • iTunes 3, iPhoto 2, iMovie 3 Install CD For systems without a SuperDrive (Version 1.0, 2Z691-4301-A, 2003)
  • Keynote (Version 1.0, 691-4149-A, 2003)
  • Wireless Keyboard and Mouse Software (Built for Mac OS X v10.2.6 or later, Version 1.1, 2Z691-4661-A, 2003)
  • iMac Software Install and Restore (Mac OS version 10.2.3, DVD version 1.1, 691-4319-A, 2003)
  • AirPort Software Installation (unopened, CD Version 3.0.4, 691-4420-A)
  • Power Mac G4 Software Install and Restore (Mac OS version 10.2.3, DVD version 1.1, 691-4309-A, 2003)
  • Software Bundle (Power Mac G4, 603-2795, 2003)
  • Software Bundle (PowerBook G4 Media, 603-2714-A, 2003)
  • Mac OS X Xcode Tools Install Disc (Requires Mac OS X v10.3 or later, Version 1.0, 691-4591-A, 2003)

Previous software bundles were packaged in cardboard envelopes. In 2003 Apple changed to packaging software bundles in clear plastic packaging, shown here.

eMate 300 (1997)

The eMate 300 was designed specifically for the education market and was used extensively in the schools where I was a Director of Technology in the late 1990s to early 2000s. 

At the time, students primarily used desktop computers in a computer lab setting, while laptops were used by some school administrators and few teachers. We used the lower-cost eMate 300 for students who had difficulty handwriting, and most students and teachers preferred typing on this device over an AlphaSmart keyboard device that was also available at the time.

The eMate 300 ran the NewtonOS, a different operating system than the Macintosh computers of the time. The eMate 300 featured a 25 MHz ARM 710a processor, 8 MB of ROM, 3 MB of RAM (1MB of DRAM+2 MB of Flash Memory for user storage), a PCMCIA slot, IrDA-beaming capabilities, and a proprietary Newton InterConnect port.

The design was quite unique with a translucent aquamarine and black “clamshell” portable case with a 480×320 16-shade grayscale backlit LCD display. The eMate 300 included a stylus and a built-in keyboard (and did not support a mouse).

The eMate was the only Newton model to resemble a traditional laptop rather than a handheld device. Although the device was called the eMate “300,” no other models were manufactured.

eMate 300 design elements were clearly used in later Apple designs: the translucent plastic would show up a year later in the original Bondi blue iMac and later in the original iBook designs; the retro-futuristic curves and overall shape was also echoed in the iMac and iBook; and the NewtonOS is often considered a precursor to the iPhoneOS that would later become iOS.

My collection features several eMate 300 devices, many of them including original packaging.

Source: EveryMac.com

eMac (2003)

The eMac was released in 2002 as the final CRT-based all-in-one Mac. It was manufactured for a relatively long time—just over 4 years—and was discontinued in 2006. Although the design is similar to the CRT iMac, it lacks a handle and was extremely difficult to move with a weight of 50 pounds. In addition, the screen size is larger than the original iMac and the eMac features a G4 processor, making it significantly faster.

The eMac was intended to be an education-only Mac, but its popularity, power, and lower price made it attractive to the consumer market. When the eMac was released, the second-generation iMac had just been introduced with a flat-panel display on an adjustable chrome arm. At the time, LCD screens were considerably more expensive than CRT screens so an eMac could be purchased for $999, while second-generation iMac cost $1,299.

The eMac in my collection was manufactured in 2003. Almost 10 years after I acquired my eMac, I was able to get an Apple eMac Tilt and Swivel Stand (M8784G/A). The stand is attached to the bottom of the eMac to both raise it to a more comfortable viewing height and allow it to easily tilt.

Information adapted from EveryMac.com.