Tiger World Premiere brochure (2005)

This Tiger World Premiere brochure was given at Apple stores the evening of the “Tiger,” Mac OS X, version 10.4, operating system’s release. A giveaway accompanied the event. The front of the brochure reads: “Win a PowerBook G4, an iPod, or other prizes. Friday, April 29, 6 p.m. to midnight.”

The back of the brochure has the headline: “Rethought. Reengineered. Reborn.” Several of Tiger’s “over 200 new features” are highlighted below, including: Spotlight, iChat AV, Automator, .Mac, Dashboard, Safari RSS, QuickTime 7, and Mail.

Upon release, Tiger cost $129.95. While Tiger was the current Mac OS, Apple transitioned to Macs with Intel chips. Therefore, Tiger was the first Mac OS to support the Intel architecture on Mac. Tiger was preceded by Mac OS X 10.3 Panther and succeeded by Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard.

This 1-page brochure measures 4.25 x 8.75 inches and was printed with metallic ink.

iLife ’09 box (2009)

iLife is a suite of software by Apple that has included the apps iMovie, iDVD, iTunes, iPhoto, GarageBand, and iWeb.

iMovie began as a free app released in October 1999 along with the iMac DV as an easy-to-use video editing app.

iDVD was announced in January 2001 and released with the Power Mac G4 that included a SuperDrive that could read and write CDs and DVDs. iDVD introduced a way for users to design customized DVDs with menus, graphics, photo slideshows, and movies that could be played on standard DVD players.

iTunes was originally released in January 2001 as a media player and organizer for the Mac.

iPhoto was released January 7, 2002, as a way to import and organize photos and perform basic photo editing.

GarageBand was released in 2004 as an easy way for beginner and advanced musicians to create and edit music.

Finally, iWeb was introduced in January 2006 as an app to create and maintain websites without having to know or write HTML or other coding languages.

The original version of iLife was released in 2003 and cost $49. It included iPhoto 2, iTunes 3, iMovie 3, and iDVD 3.

iLife ’04 (2004) cost $49 and included iPhoto 4, iTunes 4.2, iMovie 4, iDVD 4, and GarageBand 1.

iLife ’05 (2005) cost $79 and included iPhoto 5, iTunes 4.7.1, iMovie HD 5, iDVD 5, and GarageBand 2.

iLife ’06 (2006) cost $79 and included iPhoto 6, iTunes 6.0.2, iMovie HD 6, iDVD 6, GarageBand 3, and added iWeb 1.

iLife ’08 (2008) cost $79 and included iPhoto 7.0, iTunes 7.3, iMovie 7.0 (HD 6), iDVD 7.0, GarageBand 4.0, and iWeb 2.0.

iLife ’09 (2009) cost $79 and included iPhoto 8.0, iMovie 8.0, iDVD 7.0.3, GarageBand 5.0, and iWeb 3.0. iTunes was removed from iLife ‘09.

iLife ’11 (Late 2010) dropped to $49 and included iPhoto 9.0, iMovie 9.0, iDVD 7.1, GarageBand 6.0, and iWeb 3.0.2. In January 2011 a version of iLife ’11 became available on the Mac App Store at $15 per app featuring iPhoto 9.1, iMovie 9.0.9, and GarageBand 6.0.5. iLife ‘11 on the Mac App Store dropped both iDVD and iWeb.

iLife ’13 (2013) was free to previous iLife users and included iPhoto 9.5, iMovie 10.0, and GarageBand 10.0.

This is the retail packaging for iLife ’09. The box features a stylized version of the word “iLife” in the Apple Myriad font where each letter represents a feature of the iLife apps: “i” uses film and a lens to represent iMovie, “L” uses the bulletin board design of the iWeb icon, the second “i” uses music notes on staves to represent GarageBand, “f” uses a generic background pattern, and “e” features a sunset similar to the iPhoto icon. The back of the box shows the four iLife apps with three or four bullets each that highlight each app’s features.

Source: Wikipedia (iLife, iTunes)

Apple Developer Connection Select Membership box and DVDs (2007)

The Apple Developer Connection Select Membership box was sent to new members of the Apple Developer program that served as a “welcome kit” to the ADC program. Based on its contents, this membership box was sent in February 2007 (the DVD design features a large 02/07 in red-orange Apple Myriad font). After the box was sent, new content could be downloaded from the Apple Developer website and no new physical media (CDs/DVDs) was necessary.

This Apple Developer Connection box contains a welcome letter, a set of DVD-ROMs (Developer DVD Series—February 2007), and the then-current Mac OS X Leopard Developer Preview DVD.

The welcome letter reads:

Welcome to Apple Developer Connection Select Membership.

This orientation package includes the resources you need to get started-all in a convenient case that can be used to store the Mac OS X releases and monthly Developer DVDs you’ll receive as part of your once-a-year membership.

The enclosed brochure provides an summary of your Select benefits, including:
• Early access to Mac OS X, Xcode Tools, and other Apple technologies
• Two one-on-one discussions with Apple’s developer technical support engineers
• Significant savings on one Apple hardware system for development and testing
• Access to ADC’s state-of-the-art Compatibility Labs up to two times a month

You also get the Leopard Early Start Kit-exclusive, advance access to a complete set of development resources to help you develop applications for the next major release of Mac OS X.

More information on your membership may be found in ADC “Frequently Asked Questions” at developer.apple.com/faq/. Feel free to contact us with specific questions at developer.apple.com/contact/.

Again, welcome to ADC Select Membership. We look forward to helping you develop and market world-class Mac OS X products and solutions.

Apple Developer Connection

The DVD contains the following folders:

  • About this DVD (html-based reference library)
  • What’s New (software updates including Airport Update 2006-002, Security Update 2006-008 PPC, Security Update 2006-008 Universal)
  • ADC Reference Library (html-based library)
  • Development Kits
    • Apple Loops SDK
    • AppleScript SDK
    • Bonjour SDK for Windows
    • CardBus DDK
    • Core Audio SDK
    • DotMac SDK
    • FireWire SDK
    • Image Capture SDK
    • iMovie Plug-in SDK
    • iTunes COM for Windows SDK
    • iTunes Visual Plug-ins SDK
    • Kernel Debug Kit
    • Kernel Debug Kit 10.4.6
    • Kernel Debug Kit 10.4.7
    • Kernel Debug Kit 10.4.8
    • Language Analysis
    • Mac OS X USB Debug Kit
    • Multiprocessing 2.1v2 SDK
    • PCI DDK 1.1.1 Mac OS X
    • Power Manager DDK for Mac OS X
    • QuickTime for Java Windows SDK
    • QuickTime for Windows
    • QuickTime SDK
    • Sherlock Channel SDK
    • Software License Agreements for UDIFs
    • Text Encoding Converter 1.5
    • USB Debug Kits
  • Tools
    • Developer Utilities
    • Localization Tools
    • Networking & Communications
    • QuickTime
    • Testing & Debugging
  • Xcode Tools (Xcode Tools 2.4.1 Release for Mac OS X v10.4 Tiger)

Source: Apple

Mac OS X Server box (2003)

This box is the retail packaging for Mac OS X Server, Version 10.3 Panther. The artwork on the box changed considerably from the previous Jaguar-fur-covered X in Apple Garamond to a new, more blocky serif font with a metallic finish.

This version was released on October 24, 2003, and added LDAP-based Open Directory user and file management.

A new Workgroup Manager application allowed for a vast improvement for configuration. Other network services were added or improved including SNMP, Apache web server, mail server, OpenLDAP, AFP, print server, SMB version 3 (improved Windows compatibility), MySQL (4.0.16), and PHP (4.3.7).

The box indicates that it contains Mac OS X Server v10.3, Admin Tools, Xcode, getting started guide, electronic documentation.

Source: Wikipedia (Panther, Mac OS X Server)

Mac OS X Tiger 10.4.6 (2005)

The version of Mac OS X Tiger, Version 10.4.6, specifies that this version has over 200 new features and mentions “Spotlight search technology, Dashboard widgets, Safari RSS web news, iChat AV… [and] H.264 Quicktime [sic] video.”

Since this is not the initial release of Mac OS X Tiger, it is packaged in a designed software sleeve—not in a retail box.

Source: Wikipedia

Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard box (2007)

This is the retail box for Mac OS X Leopard, Version 10.5. Although the OS features the codename “Leopard,” Apple instead chose to use a metallic print idea highlighting a space theme (echoing a new space-themed wallpaper included with the release) for the artwork.

The box highlights five new features of apps and services in the OS:

  • Finder—See your files in Cover Flow.
  • Spaces—Organize your windows.
  • Time Machine—Automatic backup.
  • Mail—Stylish email stationery.
  • iChat—Add effects to video chat.

Apple described this update as “the largest update of Mac OS X” with over 300 new features. Leopard was also the first Mac OS X version to drop support for the Classic Environment that allowed users to run Mac OS 9 “Classic” apps within Mac OS X.

Source: Wikipedia

Mac OS X Server 10.6 box (2011)

The Mac OS X Server Version 10.6 Snow Leopard Server retail box was white and used a photo of a snow leopard as the front box art.

Its tagline, shown on the back of the box, was: “More power to your business. Communicate, collaborate, and share with Snow Leopard Server.” Six featured technologies shown on the box back included:

  • Server Preferences
  • Wiki Server 2
  • Podcast Producer 2
  • iCal Server 2
  • Mail Server
  • Address Book Server

This was the first Mac OS X Server version to include Mobile Access Server to allow iPhone and Mac users to access secured network services with SSL encryption and authentication between a user’s iPhone or Mac and a private network.

Snow Leopard Server was only available in an unlimited client license and cost $499.

Source: Wikipedia

Xsan 2 box (2008)

This Xsan 2 retail box from 2008 includes the software to set up Apple’s SAN (Storage Area Network) solution on a Mac with a G5 processor with an Apple Fibre Channel card running Mac OS X or Mac OS X Server 10.5 or later.

The box uses the tagline, “Share terabytes of storage. Zero bottlenecks.”

The four key technologies highlighted on the box include:

  • Simplified setup
  • MultiSAN
  • Full-throttle performance
  • Spotlight

The Xsan 2 setup guide is not for the faint of heart. It lists “Equipment You’ll Need” and specifies, “To set up a SAN using the instructions in this guide, you need:”

  • RAID storage devices for SAN storage
  • Two computers running Mac OS X Server v10.5 to act as SAN metadata controllers
  • One or more SAN client computers running Mac OS X v10.5 or Mac OS X Server v10.5
  • An Intel or PowerPC G5 processor and at least 2 GB of RAM in each SAN computer
  • An additional 2 GB per SAN volume in each metadata controller that hosts more
  • than one SAN volume
  • An Apple Fibre Channel PCI, PCI-X, or PCI-E card installed in each SAN computer
  • A Fibre Channel switch and cables for all storage devices and computers
  • An Ethernet switch and cables for the private SAN metadata network
  • A second Ethernet switch and cables for public intranet and Internet access
  • An equipment rack for your RAID storage systems and Xserve computers
  • A list of qualified RAID systems and Fibre Channel switches is available on the Xsan website at www.apple.com/xsan

Source: Apple

Resource Library CDs (1999)

This 2-CD set from May 1999 is titled The Apple Sales and Marketing Resource Library, Provider Edition.

CD 1 contains:
PowerSales May 1999
Apple Load Ad Slicks
ColorSync White Paper
Final Cut DataSheet & FAQ
QuickTime 4.0 Data & Fact Sheet
Mac OS X Server Data Sheet & FAQ
Mac OS X Server Presentation
Mac Products Guide 04.99
Mac OS Promos

CD 2 contains:
Mac OS X Server Training

The CDs also include, “See insert for complete listing,” indicating that a CD insert was also printed, but it is not included in my collection.