Apple Watch Series 6 (Black Unity, 44mm, GPS, 2020)

The Black Unity Apple Watch was Apple’s first “limited-edition Apple Watch Series 6” and was described as being part of a collection including the watch, the Black Unity Sport Band, and a Unity watch face.

Apple described the Black Unity Watch: “Inspired by the colors of the Pan‑African flag, the Black Unity Collection celebrates a symbol that unites people across the African Diaspora. Apple supports organizations dedicated to advancing racial equity and justice.”

The Apple Watch Series 6 was nearly identical to the Series 5 models, but the Series 6 added some new internal features: faster chip, a new Blood Oxygen sensor (SpO2), and an altimeter that was always on. Like all previous Apple Watch models, the Apple Watch Series 6 uses a Digital Crown and a touch display. The screen is OLED at 368×448.

On Apple’s product page dedicated to the Black Unity Apple Watch, detailed information was provided about the design and symbolism behind the watch:

“Designed by Black creatives and allies throughout Apple to celebrate and acknowledge Black history and culture, the Black Unity Sport Band is inspired by the colors of the Pan-African flag and pays homage to the rich tradition and craft of quilt-making. Three individual pieces of colored fluoroelastomer are assembled by hand and compression-molded as one. Complemented by the dynamic Unity watch face, which displays an ever-changing pattern of irregular shapes as Apple Watch moves, these colors are brought together in a unique tapestry. The innovative pin-and-tuck closure is laser-etched with ‘Truth. Power. Solidarity.'”

Like Apple’s (PRODUCT)RED efforts to provide charitable donations in support of HIV/AIDS and COVID-19, Apple took this opportunity to show support for organizations dedicated to advancing racial equity and justice:

  • Black Lives Matter Support Fund via the Tides Foundation—The Black Lives Matter movement fuels campaigns for justice, combats and counters acts of violence, and creates space for Black imagination and innovation.
  • European Network Against Racism (ENAR)—ENAR, a pan-European anti-racism network, is the voice of the anti-racist movement in Europe.
  • International Institute on Race, Equality and Human Rights—The institute works to protect the human rights of marginalized and vulnerable people who suffer from discrimination.
  • Leadership Conference Education Fund—The Leadership Conference Education Fund promotes and protects civil and human rights and builds public education campaigns that empower and mobilize advocates around the United States.
  • NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc. (LDF)—LDF seeks structural changes to expand democracy, eliminate disparities, and achieve racial justice to fulfill the promise of equality for all Americans.
  • Souls Grown Deep—The partnership is dedicated to promoting the work of African American artists and supporting their communities by fostering economic empowerment, racial and social justice, and educational advancement.

Source: Everymac, Apple (Watch, press release)

45W MagSafe 2 Power Adapter (OEM packaging, 2019)

This Apple 45W MagSafe 2 Power Adapter was designed for the MacBook Air laptops including MacBook Air (13-inch, Early 2015–2017) and the MacBook Air (11-inch, Early 2015). It could be used with any Mac laptop with the MagSafe 2 adapter, but may not charge as optimally as power adapters with higher wattages.

Apple describes the power adapter:

“The 45W MagSafe 2 Power Adapter features a magnetic DC connector so if someone should trip over it, the cord disconnects harmlessly and your MacBook Air stays put safely. It also helps prevent fraying or weakening of the cables over time. In addition, the magnetic DC helps guide the plug into the system for a quick and secure connection.”

Further, “Designed to be the perfect traveling companion, the adapter has a clever design which allows the DC cable to be wound neatly around itself for easy cable storage.”

This particular 45W MagSafe 2 Power Adapter is an Apple OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) part. It ships in a cardboard box with black cardboard and clear plastic wraps instead of the white retail box.

Source: Apple

iPhone XR (packaging, 2018, 2020)

In 2020 Apple made a major change to its iPhone 12 packaging when they stopped including Lightning headphones and a wall power “brick” charger in the box at the time of an iPhone purchase. With these items removed, Apple was able to reduce the size of the iPhone box and reduce the extra packaging associated with the headphones and charger. It was announced that the iPhone 12 would ship only with the phone and a USB-C-to-Lightning charging cable.

Lisa Jackson, Apple’s Vice President of Environment, Policy, and Social Initiatives, announced at an October 2020 Apple event, “Customers already have over 700 million Lightning headphones, and many customers have moved to a wireless experience with AirPods, Beats, or other wireless headphones. And there are also over 2 billion Apple power adapters out in the world, and that’s not counting the billions of third-party adapters. So we are removing these items from the iPhone box.”

With the iPhone 12 announcement, I was not at all expecting this packaging change to also affect older, but still manufactured iPhone models. At the time of the iPhone 12 release, Apple was still offering the iPhone XR as a lower-end and less expensive iPhone option. Surprisingly, the iPhone XR packaging was also reduced in size and shipped without the headphones and charger. Also, the cable was switched to a USB-C-to-Lightning, replacing the former USB-to-Lightning option.

While the change may contribute to some environmental benefits, the situation was not universally accepted as positive. Some critics noted that, “The move saves the company money, but some of the environmental benefits could be offset by people buying earbuds and chargers separately” (The Verge). From a practical standpoint, some users—namely enterprise, government, and school districts like mine—had not switched to USB-C when this decision was made. As Apple indicated, it is likely that most users likely already have more than one charger and at least one set of Lightning headphones.

The photos here represent my school district’s iPhone XR upgrade affected mid-stream—where iPhone XR models purchased before October 2020 used “classic” packaging, and devices purchased in late-October/November 2020 unexpectedly used the new packaging without an announcement or warning.

Sources: AppleInsider, The Verge

Xserve Power Cord (2003)

This short (11-inch) power cord shipped with a later version of the Xserve or the Xserve RAID, a rack-mount server from Apple produced from 2002–2009. This short power cord was ideal for a rack-mounted server to conserve both rack space and weight.

The Apple Xserve had the ability to house two power supplies so there was redundancy in the event one power supply failed. According to one of the Xserve User Guides:

Power supply and power supply bays—A removable power supply for the Xserve. The power cord connects here. You can install two 750- watt power supplies for redundancy; either supply can take over the full load for the Xserve if the other supply fails or is removed.

The original Xserve User’s Guide specifies that it only ships with a long power cord: “You can use the long power cord supplied with the server, or another cord…” Thus, this power cord likely shipped with a later Xserve model. The Xserve RAID User Guide acknowledges that the Xserve RAID may have shipped with more than one type of power cord (“If you received more than two power cords, use the ones with plugs compatible with the electrical supply for your location.”)

Source: Apple (Xserve, Xserve RAID)

iPad 10W USB Power Adapter (unopened, 2011)

This iPad 10W USB Power Adapter is compatible with iPad, iPhone, iPod touch, and iPod nano devices with a 30-pin connector. The part number is MC359LL/A.

The box contains three parts, a 30-pin to USB cable, a power “brick,” and a removable 2-prong US power plug. This example is unopened in its original packaging.

iBook Power Adapter (1999)

This iBook Power Adapter is for the original iBook models (1999–2001) with the “clamshell” design. The model number is M7387LL/A.

The iBook Power Adapter is in two parts. The round silver “yo-yo” part has a white Apple logo and allows the thin cord that plugs into the iBook power port to wrap around the inside of the circle for storage. The part of the cord that plugs into the wall is primarily white with transparent ends, allowing the internal wiring to be visible. This transparent design aesthetic is consistent with the translucent plastics used on both the iBook and the color iMac models of the time.

This iBook Power Adapter is stored in its original packaging.

Apple Keyboard (M0116, 1987)

The Apple Keyboard was also referred to as the Apple Standard Keyboard and was offered in addition to the lighter and slimmer Apple Desktop Bus Keyboard. The name Apple Keyboard would later be applied to different Apple keyboard designs, but this was the first use of this name.

This Apple Keyboard used Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) connections. The keyboard offered two ADB connections allowing the user to connect an Apple Desktop Bus Mouse to the keyboard (or directly to the back of the computer). This keyboard was both sold separately and included as an option with the Macintosh II and SE in 1987.

This keyboard also included a power button, a feature that would remain on Apple keyboards until the early 2000s. (The original Apple USB keyboard included with the original iMac was the last Apple keyboard to include a dedicated power button.)

This particular keyboard is damaged in the right side, but its performance is not affected.

Source: Wikipedia

Newton 9W Power Adapter (1997)

The Newton 9W Power Adapter could be used with all Newton MessagePad products in the United States, Canada, and Japan. An Apple price list also noted that this adapter could “recharge the NiCd Rechargeable Battery Pack for the MessagePad 120 and 130, and the NiMH Rechargeable Battery Pack for the MessagePad 2000 and 2100.”

Source: Apple

QuickTake AC Adapter for QuickTake 200 (1997)

The QuickTake AC Adapter for QuickTake 200 was sold separately from the QuickTake 200. According to the product box, this adapter “Lets you run your QuickTake 200 digital camera using AC power.”

I remember using the QuickTake AC Adapter primarily for school projects that involved the QuickTake 200 on a tripod and taking photos of many students or student work examples in succession.

Source: Apple

Apple USB Keyboard (blueberry, 1998)

The Apple USB Keyboard was released with the original Bondi blue iMac in 1998. This keyboard used translucent plastics to match the iMac models that shipped with them for the next two years and was available in Bondi blue, blueberry, strawberry, lime, tangerine, grape, and graphite.

The bottom of the keyboard included a support leg that allowed the keyboard to lay flat or tilt up. The keyboard included a full row of half-height function (fn) keys, a keypad, and a dedicated power key in the upper-right corner.

Source: Wikipedia.org