ADE Yes!…and, buttons (2007)

This collection of three buttons is from an Apple Distinguished Educator (ADE) event during which ADEs learned about the “Yes, and…” principle of improvisational comedy, or “improv.”

Improv comedy performers work together to “define the parameters and action of the scene, in a process of co-creation.” An improv performer must accept the premise of another performer (i.e., “yes,”) and then add to it (i.e., “and…”). “It is the responsibility of the other improvisers to accept the offers that their fellow performers make… Accepting an offer is usually accompanied by adding a new offer, often building on the earlier one” (Wikipedia).

Modern improvisational comedy began to be formalized in Chicago, through exercises developed by Viola Spolin, who influenced “the first generation of modern American improvisers at The Compass Players in Chicago, which led to The Second City” (Wikipedia).

At this ADE event, we used the “Yes!…and” idea as a foundation for educational collaboration. Educators worked in small groups with San Francisco-based improv performer/teacher Rebecca Stockley to learn the concept.

One of the white buttons features the Apple Distinguished Educators logo of the time (an iMac with a woodcut design with the Apple Distinguished Educators logotype) and the words Yes!…and, in the Myriad Apple font. Another button features the words Yes!…and, in the Myriad Apple font superimposed over a gray world map on a white button. A third, smaller button with a black background features the words Yes…And! in white in the Gill Sans font (used in the Newton product line from 1993–1998).

Wikipedia (Improvisational theatre, typography of Apple)

Getting Started Book (2006)

This book, titled Getting Started: Apple Technology for Diverse Learners (An essential teaching and learning resource written by Apple Distinguished Educators) was released in October 2006 with contributions from Dr. Mary Male, Dianna Williamson, and Robert E.M. Craven—all from different California schools.

The book contains a Foreword and three main sections: Setting Up and Personalizing a Mac for Diverse Learner Needs, Using the Applications on a Mac With Diverse Learners, and Connecting Learner Needs With the Built-in Tools on a Mac. The book contains 62 pages and measures 9×7 inches.

Stories Worth Telling Book (2004)

This Apple Distinguished Educator book publication was released in 2004 and is titled, Stories Worth Telling: A Guide to Creating Student-Led Documentaries. The book authors are Mary Palmer (English Teacher) and Perry Lee (Social Studies Teacher), from Central High School in Bismarck, North Dakota.

A Documentary Resource CD is also available as a companion to this book.

Written by teachers, the book is a how-to manual to teach the process of planning, writing, filming, and editing student-led documentaries using iMovie and other Apple software of the time.

Chapters include:
Chapter 1: Sharing Our Start
Chapter 2: Getting Started and Setting Expectations
Chapter 3: Managing the Project
Chapter 4: Managing the Production Process
Chapter 5: Interviewing Skills
Chapter 6: The Writing Process
Chapter 7: The Editing Process: Celebrating and Reaping the Benefits

Several Appendices include sample assessments, transcripts, and other templates.

Documentary Resource CD (2004)

This Documentary Resource CD was a companion to an Apple Distinguished Educator book from 2004, Stories Worth Telling: A Guide to Creating Student-Led Documentaries. The student featured on the front of the CD packaging is the same female student featured on the cover of the book.

The book authors are Mary Palmer (English Teacher) and Perry Lee (Social Studies Teacher), from Central High School in Bismarck, North Dakota.