Apple DVD media (2009)

My collection of Apple CD and DVD media includes operating systems, applications, software collections that shipped with devices, promotional media, diagnostic tools, and educational content. In general, Apple-branded CD or DVD examples in original packaging have been presented separately, while single discs or collections of discs are presented chronologically.

Apple DVDs from 2009 include:

  • 13-inch MacBook Pro Mac OS X Install DVD (Mac OS version 10.5.7, Disc version 1.1, 2Z691-6468-A, 2009)
  • iMac Mac OS X Install DVD (Mac OS X version 10.6.2, Disc version 1.0, 2Z691-6590-A, 2009)

Apple Gift Cards (2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2012, 2014)

This collection of Apple gift cards spans the years 2005–2014, and includes gift cards for use in Apple Stores, the iTunes Store, and Starbucks. Apple Store gift cards can be redeemed in brick-and-mortar or online Apple Stores for purchases. iTunes Store gift cards can only be used at the iTunes Store for digital music, video, app, or downloaded purchases.

The special Starbucks card in this collection was sold as a standard Starbucks gift card, but it also allowed two free song downloads in the iTunes Store. When I learned about this offer in 2007, I purchased 25 of these cards at $5 each (the minimum amount allowed for this promotion) and received 50 free song downloads on iTunes (and $125 in Starbucks purchases).

All of these cards have been redeemed.

Apple Earphones with Remote and Mic (without Mic for the iPod Shuffle Generation 3, 2009)

These Apple earphones are a bit of an anomaly. The design is based upon its Apple Earphones with Remote and Mic that was sold independently and also included with the iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPhone 4s, and iPod touch (Generation 3). Each of those devices used a microphone. At the same time, Apple released the iPod Shuffle Generation 3 that did not have microphone compatibility. Instead of using an old earphones design, they instead produced the same design without a microphone.

This version of the Apple Earphones with Remote and Mic without a Mic lacks the small Mic hole in the housing on the right-ear wire. Previous Apple Earphone designs lacked the + and – volume controls and the microphone on models that included the Mic.

Of course, I would love to tear these apart or X-ray them to see if Apple left out the microphone, or simply covered the microphone hole in this version of the earphones.

Sources: Apple, Apple (via webarchive)

Apple Remote (aluminum, 2009)

The Apple Remote Generation 2 was made of aluminum and featured a circular button array at the top with two buttons below. The button array had an aluminum button at the center (unmarked) used to select, and four directional buttons on a single ring-shaped button marked with white dots at the top, bottom, right, and left positions. The dots were meant to serve multiple purposes. The up and down buttons could be used as volume up/down or moving up/down on menus, while the left and right buttons could be used as forward/rewind or moving right/left in menus. The two buttons below were marked “Menu” and Play/Pause (using symbols).

The remote was aluminum with black buttons and matched the aluminum iMac at the time. This remote was powered by a CR2032 battery accessed on the back of the remote using a coin.

The design of this remote was slightly revised after initial production. The original design had the ring of buttons flush with the aluminum front. The revised design of the ring button bulges out slightly. This example uses the revised button.

This remote shipped with the first generation Apple TV and could also be used with IR-capable Mac computers. This remote can be configured to pair with a single device.

References: Wikipedia.com, Apple.com, Apple Developer

Magic Mouse (original, A1296, 2009)

Apple released the multi-touch Magic Mouse in 2009. The top curved surface of the Magic Mouse is a touch-sensitive area that allows right-clicking, left-clicking, and two-finger scrolling. The top of the mouse is white and the base is silver aluminum. This mouse connects via Bluetooth and uses two included (non-rechargeable) AA batteries. 

Several gestures are supported by the Magic Mouse, including click, two-button click, 360°-scroll, screen zoom, screen pan, two-finger swipe, one-finger swipe, two-finger double tap, and one-finger double tap. This is Apple’s first muse to use laser-tracking.

Source: Wikipedia.com

iPhone 3GS (16 GB, black, 2009)

iPhone 3GS looks nearly identical to the iPhone 3G that preceded it. The only visual difference is that the markings on the back of the phone are printed with a heavier weight font and a more reflective silver ink than the iPhone 3G.

The iPhone 3GS has many feature changes. The screen added a new “oleophobic” oil repellent coating. The “S” added to the name might refer to its increased speed: the processor increased from 412 MHz to 600 MHz, the onboard RAM doubled to 256MB, and the cellular network speed increased to 7.2 Mbps. The camera was also upgraded to 3.0 megapixel with VGA video recording at 30 FPS, as well as autofocus, macro, and white balance support, a tap to focus feature, and the ability to trim videos. The iPhone 3GS also added a compass.

Several new accessibility features were added, including VoiceOver, voice control, integrated Nike+iPod support, and an inline remote on the headphone cable, all features that had been previously added to iPod shuffle Generation 3.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod shuffle Generation 3 (4 GB, stainless steel, 2009, unopened)

The iPod shuffle Generation 3 was released in two stages. The initial release came in black and silver, and a later release added blue, green, pink, and an all-stainless-steel “Special Edition.”

The design of the iPod shuffle Generation 3 was considered somewhat controversial because it had no external screen or controls. The three controls—volume up, volume down, and “action”—are all on the earphone cable. VoiceOver technology, accessed using the “action” control, spoke song information.

This example is an unopened stainless steel Special Edition. It was only offered in a 4 GB capacity, and was only available at Apple Stores.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod nano Generation 5 (16 GB, blue, 2009)

The iPod nano Generation 5 was notable because of its impressive color choices. This model was available in nine colors: (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition, pink, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, silver, and black. The finish for the generation 5 nano is glossy and the case is made of aluminum and glass. It was available with 8 GB or 16 GB of flash memory (2000 or 4000 songs).

This iPod nano also features a video camera with an integrated microphone and speaker that takes advantage of its high-quality 2.2″ TFT display (240×376, 204 ppi). The video quality is H.264 VGA 640×480 at 30 FPS with AAC audio, but it cannot take still photographs. This iPod also has a built-in FM Radio with “live pause,” allowing pause and rewind up to 15 minutes.

My example is blue, and I remember using it as a back-up/additional video camera that had surprisingly good audio for its size.

Source: EveryMac.com

MacBook (white, 2009)

Apple originally released the MacBook in 2006 as a followup to the iBook line of laptops. The MacBook was the first laptop to use the MagSafe connector, a power connector that attached to the laptop with a magnet that easily broke free to prevent the power cord from pulling the laptop off a table or a lap.

I own both a black and white version of the first-generation MacBook. White MacBook laptops have two finishes: the outer case is glossy and prone to light scratches; the inside is a flatter and has a less reflective white finish.

Source: EveryMac.