iPod remote (for iPad Generation 3, unopened, 2004)

According to the iPod User’s Guide (for iPod Generation 3), “Your iPod includes the following components: iPod, 6-pin–to–4-pin FireWire adapter, iPod Dock (with some models), iPod Dock Connector to FireWire Cable, Apple Earphones, iPod Remote (with some models), iPod Power Adapter.”

Thus, this iPod Remote was included with some models of the iPod Generation 3. The iPod Remote uses a two-sided port that includes the headphone port and the iPod Remote port. With the iPod Remote’s dual plugs connected, you must plug your headphones into a second headphone port located on the remote.

The iPod User’s Guide explains: “To use the iPod Remote, connect it to the iPod Remote port, then connect the Apple Earphones (or another set of headphones) to the remote. Use the buttons on the remote just as you would use the iPod buttons.”

The iPod Remote includes a “rocker”-style (side-by-side) button for volume up/down, a play/pause button, a forward button, and a back button. The iPod Remote also includes a clip (to attach the remote to clothing), and Hold slider on the side.

Source: Apple

iPod Remote (for original iPod, 2001)

According to the iPod User’s Guide (for the original iPod), “The iPod Remote is included with some models of iPod and can be purchased separately.”

The iPod Remote includes a “rocker”-style (side-by-side) button for volume up/down, a play/pause button, a forward button, and a back button. The iPod Remote also includes a clip (to attach the remote to clothing), and Hold slider on the side.

The iPod User’s Guide explains its use: “To use the iPod Remote, connect it to iPod’s headphones port, then connect the Apple Earphones (or another set of headphones) to the remote. Use the remote to adjust volume, play or pause a song, fast-forward and rewind, and skip to the next or previous song. Set the remote’s Hold switch to disable the remote’s buttons.”

Source: Apple

iPhone Lightning Dock (black, 2015)

The iPhone Lightning Dock is a minimalist charging dock with a heavy base, protruding angled Lightning connector, and two ports on the back—a Lightning port and an audio jack to allow music to be played on a speaker or headphones.

The iPhone Lightning Dock has been available in several colors during its lifetime, including white, black, silver, space gray, rose gold, gold, and “new” gold (to match an updated gold iPhone color). This example is black.

Apple describes the dock: “You can use it to charge and sync any iPhone that has a Lightning connector. Your iPhone sits upright in the dock as it syncs or charges, so it’s ideal for a desk or countertop. Even when your iPhone is in an Apple-designed case, it’s easy to dock. And you can unlock iPhone or use Touch ID without having to remove it from the dock.”

Source: Apple

iPod shuffle Dock (for Generation 2 iPod shuffle, 2006)

Apple introduced the Generation 2 iPod shuffle in September 2006 and advertised it as “the most wearable iPod ever,” due to a clip on the back that could easily attach the iPod shuffle to clothing.

The iPod shuffle was so small that the 30-pin iPod dock could not be used to charge or transfer music and data to the device. Instead, the Generation 2 iPod shuffle used this iPod shuffle Dock. The dock connected to a computer with an attached USB cable and data transfer and recharging was handled through the dock’s headphone jack.

The iPod shuffle Dock was only available in white, even though the iPod shuffle was available in several colors [silver, two variations of pink, orange, green, and blue; and turquoise, lavender, mint green, and (PRODUCT)RED].

Source: Wikipedia

iPhone Bluetooth Headset (2007)

The iPhone Bluetooth Headset shipped along with the original iPhone in 2007. The design was minimalist and the device included just one button to accept/decline calls; place a call on hold/switch to a call on hold; and power the device on/off. Although the cost was relatively high at $129, the headset shipped with two additional charging methods, a dock for the iPhone and the iPhone Bluetooth Headset (with a connected USB cable); and an additional 30-pin travel cable that charged the iPhone and included an extra port to charge the iPhone Bluetooth Headset simultaneously.

Although the iPhone Bluetooth Headset had very good sound quality, it could not be used for any audio features other than phone calls—no voice dialing features or the ability to listen to iTunes or other iPhone audio was possible.

An AppleInsider review listed four “Pros:” Elegantly slim and very lightweight design; Comfortable to wear; Includes a dock and extra travel cable; Easy to set up and use. The same review included four “Cons:” Limited range and battery life; No fancy phone control features or redial; No iPhone audio support apart from phone calls; No voice dialing support.

Original iPhone owners, me included, purchased the original iPhone for $599, a price considered high at the time. About a month after the original iPhone’s release when the product was clearly becoming a success, Apple dropped the price by $99 and issued early iPhone purchasers a $99 Apple Store credit. I used this credit toward the purchase of this iPhone Bluetooth Headset.

Source: AppleInsider

iPhone 4 Bumper Case (orange, 2010)

The iPhone 4 Bumper Case was released in 2010 along with the iPhone 4. Unfortunately, this case was placed in the middle of a famous and rare Apple public relations issue, “Antennagate.” The design of this case is very simple, a plastic and rubber bumper that surrounds the outer edges of the iPhone 4 providing drop protection, a gripping-rubber lip that prevents the front and back of the iPhone 4 from making contact with a surface when placed flat, and a barrier that prevents holding the phone in a manner that may affect antenna performance.

MacWorld described the bumper case: “It consists of a stiff, plastic band that covers the entire metal edge of the iPhone 4, combined with relatively tough rubber around the front and rear edges to hold the Bumper in place.”

Antennagate was a name given by the media to a phenomenon that was reported soon after the iPhone 4 release on June 24, 2010, where the cell phone signal would drop if the phone was gripped in a way that covered the integrated antenna. Apple’s reaction was to hold a press conference 22 days after the iPhone release, hosted by Steve Jobs, who confirmed the iPhone 4 issue (and mentioned the same issue was present on competitor phones), presented several customer purchasing and phone performance statistics, and offered the black version of this case for free (or refunded previous bumper case purchases).

Apple offered this case in black, orange, blue, pink, green, white, dark gray, and later, (PRODUCT)RED.

Sources: MacWorld (case program, review), PCWorld, AppleInsider

Apple Watch Sport Loop (44 mm, Pride, Fall 2018)

The Apple Watch Sport Loop band is woven from nylon thread to create a hook-and-loop closure. They are available for the 38/40 mm and 42/44 mm Apple Watch models, and are offered in Regular size to fit 130–190 mm wrists. A Black Sport Loop was offered in size XL.

The Apple Watch Sport Loop band has been available in several styles, including (PRODUCT)RED, Spicy Orange, Nectarine, Electric Pink, Hibiscus, Hot Pink, Pink Sand, Flash Light, Flash, Marine Green, Tahoe Blue, Cape Cod Blue, Midnight Blue, Indigo, Dark Olive, Storm Gray, Black, and Seashell. Close inspection of original styles reveal that designs are comprised of a base color and one or more accent colors; for example, Indigo uses a dark blue base color with accent threads in white, red, and purple. Newer styles use a two-tone design with one or more accent colors, including Pomegranate, Khaki, Alaskan Blue, Anchor Gray, Camel, Midnight Blue, and an alternate 2019 (PRODUCT)RED design; for example, Camel features a tan side and a yellow side with light gray accents. This Pride design features the rainbow colors of the LGBTQ flag.

Apple describes the Apple Watch Sport Loop band:

“Soft, breathable, and lightweight, the Sport Loop features a hook-and-loop fastener for quick and easy adjustment. The double-layer nylon weave has dense loops on the skin side that provide soft cushioning while allowing moisture to escape. On the reverse side, the attachment loops are securely anchored for superior durability.”

This is Apple’s fourth version of the Pride design. The original Pride band, the most rare, was gifted to the Apple employees who participated in the June 2016 San Francisco Pride Parade. According to 9to5Mac, the original Pride band was a “rainbow colored nylon strap and red lugs” that was distributed with a pamphlet that read, “This limited-edition band is a symbol of our commitment to equality and we hope you’ll wear it with pride.” Apple began selling the second Pride Edition design in Spring 2016 in Apple’s Woven Nylon style. In Summer 2018 a third Pride Edition Band was offered in the Woven Nylon style, but featured the LGBT flag colors on a white background. In June 2019 this fourth version of the Pride design returned to the original rainbow design, but the band style was changed to the Sport Loop.

This example is an unopened June 2019 Apple Sport Loop Pride Edition in the 44 mm size. Since Apple has sold this band, they have donated some of the proceeds of Apple Watch Pride Edition bands to LGBTQ organizations:

“Apple is proud to support LGBTQ advocacy organizations working to bring about positive change, including GLSEN, PFLAG, The Trevor Project, Gender Spectrum, and The National Center for Transgender Equality in the U.S., and ILGA internationally. A portion of the proceeds from Pride Edition band sales will benefit their important efforts.”

Sources: Apple, iMore, 9to5Mac (2016, 2019)

Apple Watch Leather Loop (42 mm, Black, Spring 2015)

The Apple Watch Leather Loop band is comprised of leather-wrapped magnets. The band is sold in two sizes, Medium for 150–185 mm wrists and Large for 180–210 mm wrists. They are also available for both the 38/40 mm and 42/44 mm Apple Watch models.

The Leather Loop band was among Apple’s original band designs in 2015 and has been available in several colors, including Stone, Light Brown, Saddle Brown, Forest Green, Cosmos Blue, Cape Cod Blue, Bright Blue, Midnight Blue, Black, Charcoal Gray, Storm Gray, Smoke Gray, White, and Meyer Lemon.

Apple describes the Apple Watch Leather Loop band:

“The Venezia leather for this band is handcrafted in Arzignano, Italy. With an artisan heritage spanning five generations, the tannery has a history of partnership with some of the most prestigious names in fashion. A delicate milling and tumbling process enhances the beautiful pebbled texture. And magnets concealed within the soft, quilted leather allow you to simply wrap it around your wrist for a precise fit and a trim look.”

This is the band I purchased along with my original Stainless Steel Apple Watch, and it definitely shows some signs of wear. I like this style because it uses no mechanical fasteners that might potentially scratch a surface.

Source: Apple

Apple Watch Leather Loop (42 mm, Midnight Blue, Fall 2015)

The Apple Watch Leather Loop band is comprised of leather-wrapped magnets. The band is sold in two sizes, Medium for 150–185 mm wrists and Large for 180–210 mm wrists. They are available for both the 38/40 mm and 42/44 mm Apple Watch models.

The Leather Loop band was among Apple’s original band designs in 2015 and has been available in several colors, including Stone, Light Brown, Saddle Brown, Forest Green, Cosmos Blue, Cape Cod Blue, Bright Blue, Midnight Blue, Black, Charcoal Gray, Storm Gray, Smoke Gray, White, and Meyer Lemon.

Apple describes the Apple Watch Leather Loop band:

“The Venezia leather for this band is handcrafted in Arzignano, Italy. With an artisan heritage spanning five generations, the tannery has a history of partnership with some of the most prestigious names in fashion. A delicate milling and tumbling process enhances the beautiful pebbled texture. And magnets concealed within the soft, quilted leather allow you to simply wrap it around your wrist for a precise fit and a trim look.”

The Midnight Blue band is a very dark shade of blue and looks good with Stainless Steel, Aluminum, and Space Gray Apple Watch models. I like this style because it uses no mechanical fasteners that might potentially scratch a surface.

Source: Apple

Apple Watch Leather Loop (44 mm, Cape Cod Blue, Fall 2018)

The Apple Watch Leather Loop band is comprised of leather-wrapped magnets. The band is sold in two sizes, Medium for 150–185 mm wrists and Large for 180–210 mm wrists. They are available for both the 38/40 mm and 42/44 mm Apple Watch models.

The Leather Loop band was among Apple’s original band designs in 2015 and has been available in several colors, including Stone, Light Brown, Saddle Brown, Forest Green, Cosmos Blue, Cape Cod Blue, Bright Blue, Midnight Blue, Black, Charcoal Gray, Storm Gray, Smoke Gray, White, and Meyer Lemon.

Apple describes the Apple Watch Leather Loop band:

“The Venezia leather for this band is handcrafted in Arzignano, Italy. With an artisan heritage spanning five generations, the tannery has a history of partnership with some of the most prestigious names in fashion. A delicate milling and tumbling process enhances the beautiful pebbled texture. And magnets concealed within the soft, quilted leather allow you to simply wrap it around your wrist for a precise fit and a trim look.”

This Cape Cod Blue band has been among the more unusual colors offered by Apple, and I pair mine with with Stainless Steel, Aluminum, and Space Gray Apple Watch models. I like this style because it uses no mechanical fasteners that might potentially scratch a surface.

Source: Apple