AirPort Express 802.11n (Generation 2, 2012)

The AirPort Express Generation 2 functioned as a wireless access point, to extend the range of a network, as an Ethernet-to-wireless bridge, as a print server, and/or as an audio server. This model allowed up to 50 networked users using the 802.11a/n Wi-Fi standard.

Connectors included an audio connector that combined a 3.5 mm minijack socket and a mini-TOSLINK optical digital connection. On August 28, 2018, AirPlay 2 support was added to the Generation 2 AirPort Express, giving it features similar to HomePod.

Source: Wikipedia

EarPods (with 3.5 mm Headphone Plug)

The EarPods design replaced a previous Apple headphone design with a circular earphone design. The product description states that, “Unlike traditional, circular earbuds, the design of the EarPods is defined by the geometry of the ear. Which makes them more comfortable for more people than any other earbud-style headphones.”

EarPods also included a remote and microphone on the right EarPod wire. The remote allowed the user to pinch the thickened cord to control volume, play/pause music and video, and answer or end a call.

The same wired EarPod design was used in the EarPods with Lightning Connector product when Apple removed the audio connector from the iPhone. Both the 3.5 mm Headphone Plug and Lightning Connector options were sold at the same time since both ports were still used in Apple products.

This product was sold in a variety of packaging. This is the same packaging that shipped inside iPhone models and also available as OEM replacement parts from some online retailers.

Source: Apple.com

Nike+iPod Sport Kit (2006)

The Nike+iPod Sport Kit was announced on May 23, 2006. A press released stated, “Nike and Apple today announced a partnership bringing the worlds of sports and music together like never before with the launch of innovative Nike+iPod products.” The two-piece wireless system included an oval sensor that was placed inside a Nike+ shoe and a 30-pin plug for the iPod nano.

Software on the iPod nano would connect to custom Nike+ footwear or any shoe with the Nike+iPod sensor attached and provided information on time, distance, calories burned, and pace on the iPod screen. In addition, “A new Nike Sport Music section on the iTunes Music Store and a new nikeplus.com personal service site help maximize the Nike+iPod experience.”

This kit was sold for $29 and included an in-shoe sensor and a receiver that attached to iPod.

Source: Apple.com

AppleDesign Powered Speakers (1993)

According to the User’s Guide, “AppleDesign Powered Speakers are the first powered speakers designed by a computer company specifically for use with a personal computer.” The guide goes on to explain that the speakers provide CD-quality sound from both the CD-ROM drive and the computer at the same time. The setup includes both a main speaker and a “satellite speaker.”

The two speakers are meant to be connected by an included speaker wire. The main speaker includes a Subwoofer output jack that allows a non-Apple powered (2 volts peak to peak) subwoofer to be connected.

The maximum sound output is listed at 90 dB at 0.5 meters and 90 Hz. The dimensions are 9.25 x 4.5 x 4.25 inches.

These AppleDesign Powered Speakers represent the first in my full collection of all of Apple’s standalone powered speakers. These speakers were followed by the AppleDesign Powered Speakers II, the iPod Hi-Fi, and eventually the HomePod. The only Apple powered speakers I do not currently own are the rare black AppleDesign Powered Speakers II.

Source: MacintoshRepository.org

Siri Remote (2015)

The Siri Remote was released in 2015 along with the Apple TV Generation 4. This remote had a glass trackpad, two microphones, and five buttons. The buttons included Menu, Home, Siri, Play/Pause, and a combined Volume up/down button. This remote used both IR and Bluetooth to connect to the Apple TV. The remote also included two sensors for gaming, an accelerometer and a gyroscope.

The finishes of the remote included a matte finish on the trackpad and a smooth, glossy finish at the bottom. The textured finishes helped differentiate the orientation of the remote when using it in the dark or by touch.

The trackpad on the Siri Remote supported limited gestures, including swipe, click, and tap.

Unlike earlier Apple Remotes, the Siri Remote used a built-in rechargeable Lithium Polymer Battery that charged using a Lightning port at the bottom.

The design of this remote was slightly revised after initial production. The original design had a solid black Menu button. The revised design added a white raised ring around the the Menu button.

References: Wikipedia.com, Apple Developer

eMate Replacement Pens (1997)

These boxes contain eMate Replacement Pens. The box is labeled “24 low-cost replacement pens for the Apple eMate 300 mobile computer.” One of the boxes I have is factory-shrink-wrapped and the other is an open partial box.

The eMate 300, a member of the Newton family, shipped with a stylus of the same design as these replacement pens. Comparing the pen that shipped with the eMate 300 and these replacement pens, the two appear identical.

Pro Speakers (2001)

Apple Pro Speakers were introduced with the Power Mac G4 (Digital Audio) and later shipped with the iMac G4. These speakers required a Mac with a built-in amplifier and a proprietary audio jack to connect.

Apple described these speakers as “designed by Harman/Kardon,” once a high-end audio company now owned by Samsung. Harman/Kardon also designed the popular iSub subwoofer and SoundSticks in partnership with Apple that were released in 2000. In both the Apple Pro Speakers and SoundSticks, Apple contributed the industrial design and mechanical engineering, while Harman/Kardon manufactured the audio components of the product.

Sources: MacWorld, Wikipedia.org

Wireless Keyboard (original, French layout, 2003)

The original Apple Wireless Keyboard was released on September 16, 2003. It was based on the design of the white Apple Keyboard with white keys in a clear plastic case. Unlike the wired version, it did not have USB ports to connect external devices.

The Wireless Keyboard connected using Bluetooth and operated on four AA batteries. The batteries were accessed on the bottom of the keyboard behind a cover secured by two plastic screws that could be opened by turning one-quarter turn using a coin.

This keyboard can be used with Macintosh computers running Mac OS X 10.2.6 or later.

This particular Wireless Keyboard has a French key layout.

Source: Wikipedia.org

Apple USB Keyboard (blueberry, 1998)

The Apple USB Keyboard was released with the original Bondi blue iMac in 1998. This keyboard used translucent plastics to match the iMac models that shipped with them for the next two years and was available in Bondi blue, blueberry, strawberry, lime, tangerine, grape, and graphite.

The bottom of the keyboard included a support leg that allowed the keyboard to lay flat or tilt up. The keyboard included a full row of half-height function (fn) keys, a keypad, and a dedicated power key in the upper-right corner.

Source: Wikipedia.org

Apple Remote (aluminum, 2009)

The Apple Remote Generation 2 was made of aluminum and featured a circular button array at the top with two buttons below. The button array had an aluminum button at the center (unmarked) used to select, and four directional buttons on a single ring-shaped button marked with white dots at the top, bottom, right, and left positions. The dots were meant to serve multiple purposes. The up and down buttons could be used as volume up/down or moving up/down on menus, while the left and right buttons could be used as forward/rewind or moving right/left in menus. The two buttons below were marked “Menu” and Play/Pause (using symbols).

The remote was aluminum with black buttons and matched the aluminum iMac at the time. This remote was powered by a CR2032 battery accessed on the back of the remote using a coin.

The design of this remote was slightly revised after initial production. The original design had the ring of buttons flush with the aluminum front. The revised design of the ring button bulges out slightly. This example uses the revised button.

This remote shipped with the first generation Apple TV and could also be used with IR-capable Mac computers. This remote can be configured to pair with a single device.

References: Wikipedia.com, Apple.com, Apple Developer