Apple PlainTalk Microphone (transparent, unopened, 1999)

This was Apple’s second PlainTalk Microphone product. This version was introduced with the AV models of the Macintosh Quadra series in 1993 and sold separately. This microphone was designed to be placed on the top of a CRT screen. The long connector was used to power the microphone.

This version of the Apple Plaintalk Microphone was cast in transparent plastic to match the G3 Blue & White tower. This microphone was included with a G3 Blue & White tower and was never opened.

The following Macs supported the PlainTalk Microphone according to Apple: Quadra 605,630,660,840; Centris 660; LC 475, 605, 520, 550, 575, 580, 630; Performa 475, 476, 520, 550, 560, 575, 577, 578, 580, 588, 630, 631, 635, 636, 637, 638, 640, 5200, 5210, 5115, 5220, 5260, 5270, 5280, 5300, 5320, 5400, 5410, 5420, 5430, 5440, 6110, 6112, 6115, 6116, 6117, 6118, 6200, 6205, 6210, 6214, 6216, 6218, 6220, 6230, 6260, 6290, 6300, 6310, 6320, 6360, 6400, 6410, 6420; Network Server 500, 700; Workgroup Server 6150, 7250, 7350, 8150, 8550, 9650; G3 Server 233, 266; G4 Server 500MHz; PowerMac 4400, 5200, 5260, 5300, 5400, 5500, 6100, 6200, 6300, 6400, 6500, 7100, 7200, 7215, 7220, 7300, 7500, 7600, 8100, 8115, 8200, 8500, 8515, 8600, 9500, 9515, 9600; PowerMac G3 Beige Desktop & Mini Tower, G3 Blue & White; Twentieth Anniversary Mac; iMac G3; and PowerMac G4 PCI, AGP, GE.

Sources: applemacparts.co.uk, Wikipedia.org

Apple SCSI System Cable (1992)

SCSI (Small Computer System Interface) was used to physically connect two computers to peripheral devices and transfer data between them. SCSI was used to connect hard disk drives, tape drives, scanners, CD drives, and other devices. SCSI is pronounced “scuzzy.”

I remember using an Apple SCSI System Cable to connect external Apple CD-ROM drives, scanners, and hard drives. The thickness of the cable made it difficult to bend and contributed to a high failure rate.

Source: Wikipedia.com

Apple SCSI Active Terminator (1992)

The SCSI (Small Computer System Interface) was used to physically connect two computers to peripheral devices and transfer data between them. SCSI was used to connect hard disk drives, tape drives, scanners, CD drives, and other devices. SCSI is pronounced “scuzzy.”

The Apple SCSI Active Terminator was used to allow “active termination” in a chain of SCSI devices. Active Termination is defined as an advanced form of terminating SCSI cables that controls “the impedance at the end of the SCSI bus by using a voltage regulator, not just the power supplied by the interface card” (myoldmac.com).

Although different SCSI interfaces were available, this terminator uses the original parallel SCSI interface.

Sources: myoldmac.net, Wikipedia.com

Macintosh PowerBook Video Cable (1992)

The Macintosh PowerBook Video Cable allowed PowerBook 100-series laptops to be connected to Apple monitors sold in the early 1990s. Both ends of the cable were Apple-proprietary.

This cable allowed users of the earliest PowerBook series, such as the PowerBook 160 with a grayscale-only display, to plug into a color Apple monitor and use the PowerBook with a color screen.

According to an Apple Support document, the cable supported a resolution of 832×624 and was compatible with the following laptops: PowerBook 1400-series, PowerBook 190-series, PowerBook 520-series, PowerBook 5300-series, PowerBook 540-series, PowerBook 550c [Japan Only], PowerBook 160/165/180, and PowerBook 165c/180c.

Source: Apple

Microphone (1990)

The Apple Microphone shipped with Macintosh LC computers and could be purchased separately. The package included a microphone and a holder with a self-adhesive back. The Microphone was an omnidirectional condenser microphone with a frequency range of 100 Hz to 10 KHz. The cable terminated in a 3.5 mm stereo plug.

The Microphone is known as a PlainTalk Microphone. The following Macs support the PlainTalk Microphone according to Apple: Quadra 605,630,660,840; Centris 660; LC 475, 605, 520, 550, 575, 580, 630; Performa 475, 476, 520, 550, 560, 575, 577, 578, 580, 588, 630, 631, 635, 636, 637, 638, 640, 5200, 5210, 5115, 5220, 5260, 5270, 5280, 5300, 5320, 5400, 5410, 5420, 5430, 5440, 6110, 6112, 6115, 6116, 6117, 6118, 6200, 6205, 6210, 6214, 6216, 6218, 6220, 6230, 6260, 6290, 6300, 6310, 6320, 6360, 6400, 6410, 6420; Network Server 500, 700; Workgroup Server 6150, 7250, 7350, 8150, 8550, 9650; G3 Server 233, 266; G4 Server 500MHz; PowerMac 4400, 5200, 5260, 5300, 5400, 5500, 6100, 6200, 6300, 6400, 6500, 7100, 7200, 7215, 7220, 7300, 7500, 7600, 8100, 8115, 8200, 8500, 8515, 8600, 9500, 9515, 9600; PowerMac G3 Beige Desktop & Mini Tower, G3 Blue & White; Twentieth Anniversary Mac; iMac G3; and PowerMac G4 PCI, AGP, GE.

I have two different versions of the packaging for these microphones. The white box is from 1990 and the brown cardboard box version is from 1991.

Sources: applemacparts.co.uk, Wikipedia.org

iPad mini Smart Cover (pink, 2012)

The iPad mini Smart cover was available for the original iPad mini. The outer cover was made of polyurethane and the interior had a microfiber lining. Magnets built into the cover allowed it to automatically wake when opened and sleep when closed. The cover could be folded into a stand to allow for viewing in an upright position or typing and drawing in a lower position.

Source: B&H Photo/Video

iPad Smart Case (dark gray, unopened, 2011)

The iPad Smart Case was available for the iPad Generation 2, 3, and 4. The outer case was made of polyurethane and the interior has a microfiber lining. Magnets built into the case allowed it to automatically wake when opened and sleep when closed. The cover could be folded into a stand to allow for viewing in an upright position or typing and drawing in a lower position.

The iPad Smart Case was available in (PRODUCT)RED, dark gray, light gray, pink, green, and light blue.

Because the part number begins with PD, it indicates that this case has been personalized. Because it is unopened, it is not clear what the personalized printing reads.

Source: B&H Photo/Video, Best Buy

DVI to ADC Adapter (2002)

The Apple DVI to ADC Adapter allowed any Apple flat-panel display using an Apple Display Connector (ADC) to be used with any computer with a DVI port. The device included a power supply, power cord, and DVI/USB cable. Apple described the capabilities of the adapter:

“It has been carefully designed to maintain the digital integrity of the video signal for the best possible viewing experience. The adapter provides an all-digital signal path between the computer and the display. It features active components that regenerate both the digital graphics and USB signals coming from the computer. This ensures delivery of the highest-quality images even at the extremely fast signal rates used by the Apple Cinema HD Display.”

The purpose of the Apple Display Connector (ADC) was to reduce display cables. ADC combined DVI, power, and USB in a 30 pin (3 x 10) connector. ADC was used between 2000–2004. The primary issue with the proprietary ADC connection was that it carried power to the display (DVI does not), thus, a typical adapter was not possible. Instead, this adapter was relatively large because it included a power supply, measuring about 5 x 5 x 1.5 inches. It was also expensive for an adapter, selling for $99 when it was released.

Mac models that could use the Apple DVI to ADC adapter included Power Mac G4 (Mirrored Drive Doors, 2002–2003), Power Mac G5 (June 2003–Late 2005), PowerBook G4 15-inch (DVI, 2002–Double Layer SD, 2005), PowerBook G4 17-inch (2003–Double Layer SD, 2005), MacBook Pro 15-inch (Early 2006–Early 2008), MacBook Pro 17-inch (Early 2006–Late 2008), Mac mini (Early 2005–Mid 2007), and Mac Pro (Early 2006–Mid 2012).

Sources: macobserver.com, usedmacs.us, macofalltrades.com

Newton Connection Kit for Macintosh (1993)

The Newton Connection Kit for Macintosh included Newton Connection software on two 3.5-inch floppy disks, a serial cable, and manuals. The kit connected a Newton personal digital assistant to a Macintosh computer and allowed the Newton to be synchronized with a Macintosh. Users could also transfer files, restore the Newton, and install software onto the Newton. A Newton Connection Kit for Windows was also available.

Source: Wikipedia.org

AirPort Extreme Base Station (Generation 2, 2007)

The AirPort Extreme was a wireless base station that combined the functions of a router, network switch, wireless access point, Network-Attached Storage (NAS), and other functions. The AirPort Extreme Base Station Generation 2 was released in 2007 with a white, rounded-rectangle design that was similar to the look of the first-generation Mac mini and original Apple TV.

The The AirPort Extreme Base Station measured 6.5 inches square, 1.3 inches tall, and weighed 1.66 pounds. It supported 802.11a/b/g and Draft 802.11n2 wireless network protocols. Ports included one Gigabit Ethernet WAN port (for connecting a DSL or cable modem), three Gigabit Ethernet LAN ports (for connecting computers or network devices), and one USB port (for connecting a USB printer or USB external hard drive).

Sources: Wikipedia.org, Apple