iTunes Apple Store brochure (2003)

This iTunes Apple Store brochure from 2003 announced an iPod giveaway. The cover is bright green with the iconic “silhouette” design featuring a person dancing in black silhouette carrying a white iPod and wearing white Apple wired earbuds. The cover reads:

“iTunes. It’s the world’s best jukebox software. It’s for Mac and Windows. It’s free. And it could win you an iPod.”

The back of the brochure has the headline “iTunes. Ready. Set. Download.” It includes the directions to set up iTunes online, thereby automatically entering to win an “iPod-a-day” until December 23, 2003.

This 1-page brochure measures 4.25 x 8.75 inches.

Hell froze over. Poster (24 x 36 inches, 2003)

This poster was made available after the Apple event in 2003 when Steve Jobs announced that iTunes would be be available for Windows, making the iPod and iTunes Music Store available to 97% more computer users. As Steve Jobs stood on the stage and made the announcement, the Keynote slide read, “Hell froze over.”

The behind-the-scenes decision was, apparently, a controversial one. Author Max Chafkin wrote that Apple’s Jon Rubinstein said:

“We argued with Steve a bunch [about putting iTunes on Windows], and he said no. Finally, Phil Schiller and I said ‘we’re going to do it.’ And Steve said… ‘do whatever you want. You’re responsible.’ And he stormed out of the room” [expletive removed].

This seemingly innocuous decision may have been the specific catalyst for Windows and other users to get their hands on Apple products—both hardware and software—for the first time. This also may have led to what was later called “ the halo effect” where new Apple users saw how well one product worked, such as the iPod, and it led them to purchase a second product, such as a Mac. Four years after this decision, the iPhone followed, and then the iPad, and Apple eventually became the world’s first trillion-dollar-valued company.

The poster measures 24 x 36 inches and is printed on heavy stock. Just below center in bold Apple Myriad font, the poster reads “Hell froze over.” Below, in smaller gray type, it reads, “Introducing iTunes for Windows. The best Windows app ever written.” At bottom center in the same gray color, there is an Apple logo and the date “October 16, 2003,” the release date of iTunes for Windows. In small type in the lower-right corner running vertically, a text line reads, “©2003 Apple Computer, Inc. All rights reserved. Apple, the Apple logo, and iTunes are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. registered in the U.S. and other countries.”

Source: LinkedIn

Mac OS X Server box (2003)

This box is the retail packaging for Mac OS X Server, Version 10.3 Panther. The artwork on the box changed considerably from the previous Jaguar-fur-covered X in Apple Garamond to a new, more blocky serif font with a metallic finish.

This version was released on October 24, 2003, and added LDAP-based Open Directory user and file management.

A new Workgroup Manager application allowed for a vast improvement for configuration. Other network services were added or improved including SNMP, Apache web server, mail server, OpenLDAP, AFP, print server, SMB version 3 (improved Windows compatibility), MySQL (4.0.16), and PHP (4.3.7).

The box indicates that it contains Mac OS X Server v10.3, Admin Tools, Xcode, getting started guide, electronic documentation.

Source: Wikipedia (Panther, Mac OS X Server)

QuickTime 4.1 CD (2000)

This QuickTime 4 CD contains QuickTime 4.1 installers for Macintosh and Windows.

The CD cover states:

  • Install QuickTime 4.1 and experience QuickTime for yourself as you interact with the demo movie included on the CD.
  • Control your media experience with the intuitive QuickTime Player.
  • Open just about any media file you come across.
  • Watch live content over the Internet.
  • Upgrade to QuickTime Pro so you can edit and save your own movies.

QuickTime 4.1 was released on December 17, 1999. The release provided support for files larger than 2.0 GB in Mac OS 9, added variable bit rate (VBR) support for MP3 audio, and removed support for older 68k Macintosh systems.

Source: Wikipedia

MacAdvocate CD-ROM (1997)

The 1997 Apple MacAdvocate CD-ROM is a marketing CD from Apple designed to allow Macintosh fans to convince other computer users to consider buying a Macintosh.

The inside of the CD explains the purpose of the CD:

Are you a MacAdvocate?

Do you plan your winter and fall vacations around the San Francisco and Boston MacWorld shows? Do you find yourself looking at Windows PC users and asking, “Why would they buy one of those without looking at a Mac?”
If you answered yes you probably are a MacAdvocate.
Welcome to the club.
As a fellow MacAdvocate, we want to provide you with the materials you need to win others over to the Macintosh—and the freedom it represents. That’s why we created this CD.
The 1997 MacAdvocate CD features all kinds of tools—such as product sheets, technology showcases, research studies, interactive demos, and system updates—you need to dazzle your friends and help you make the case that Macintosh is, simply put, the best personal computer you can buy. We’ve also included a couple of surprises, just to keep things interesting. So pop this CD into your local Macintosh and have a look. And feel free to give it to any of your Windows friends (yes, it runs on PCs too).
Because, after all, if we don’t show them, who will?

The CD part number is shown as L02177A.

Mac OS X Server box (unopened, 2001)

This version of Mac OS X Server, Mac OS X Server 10.1, was code named “Puma” and was released on September 25, 2001, just four months after Mac OS X Server 10.0.

This version and its predecessor (v.10.0 “Cheetah”) of Mac OS X Server replaced Mac OS X Server 1.0 and added all the features of Mac OS X to the server product, beginning with the new Aqua user interface. Other significant additions included Apache, PHP, MySQL, Tomcat, WebDAV support, and Macintosh Manager 2.

File services included:

  • Macintosh (AFP over TCP/IP)
  • Windows (Samba; SMB/CIFS)
  • Internet (FTP)
  • UNIX and Linux (NFS)

Internet and web services included:

  • Apache web server
  • QuickTime Streaming Server
  • WebObjects 5 Deployment
  • Mail (SMTP, POP, IMAP)
  • WebDAV
  • SSL
  • PHP
  • MySQL
  • JavaServer pages
  • Java Servelets
  • Caching web proxy

This box is shrink-wrapped and has never been opened. It contains:

  • Mac OS X Server CD (v10.1)
  • Macintosh Manager 2 CD
  • NetBoot CD
  • WebObjects 5 Deployment CD
  • Developer Tools CD
  • Installation Guide and electronic documentation

Source: Wikipedia

Mobile Me box (2010)

MobileMe is the third in Apple’s iterations of online tools suites. This boxed version of MobileMe was available in 2010 and matched other Apple retail packaging of the time.

The history of Apple’s online services has included:

iTools (released 1-5-2000) with services including @mac.com email addresses (accessed through the Mail app), iCards free greeting card service, iReview web site reviews, HomePage free web page publishing, iDisk online data storage, and a KidSafe directory of child-friendly web sites.

.Mac (pronounced “dot Mac,” released 7-17-2002) with services including HomePage web hosting, iDisk online disk storage service, @mac.com email service (POP and IMAP), iCards online greeting cards, Backup personal backup (to iDisk, CD, or DVD), and McAfee Virex. Later enhancements included an online Mail interface, Back to My Mac remote desktop, Web Gallery, and the ability to add more online web storage and segment it according to purpose.

MobileMe (released 7-9-2008) had a difficult rollout where some users experienced instability over a period of several weeks. Steve Jobs later wrote, “it was a mistake to launch MobileMe at the same time as iPhone 3G, iPhone 2.0 software, and the App Store.” Customers received a free 60-day extension of MobileMe services. Although .Mac removed some services, including iCards and some specific web services, greater iLife integration was added and primary services continued to be expanded and upgraded.

iCloud (beginning Fall 2011) was released with iOS 5 and the iPhone 4S. iCloud includes email, calendar, file across multiple devices, 5 GB of free cloud storage, and offers additional paid tiers for more storage.

For users like me who have been customers since the iTools era, all email domains remain available, including @mac.com, @me.com, and @icloud.com.

This MobileMe software box is from 2010 and features several services on the packaging: online syncing of email, calendar, and contacts; the Find My iPhone or iPad service; online photo and file storage; and an image depicting the ability of MobileMe to share files and information among iPhone, Mac/Windows, and iPad via “the Cloud.”

Source: Wikipedia

Mobile Me box (2008)

MobileMe is the third in Apple’s iterations of online tools suites. This boxed version of MobileMe was available in 2008 and matched other Apple retail packaging of the time.

The history of Apple’s online services has included:

iTools (released 1-5-2000) with services including @mac.com email addresses (accessed through the Mail app), iCards free greeting card service, iReview web site reviews, HomePage free web page publishing, iDisk online data storage, and a KidSafe directory of child-friendly web sites.

.Mac (pronounced “dot Mac,” released 7-17-2002) with services including HomePage web hosting, iDisk online disk storage service, @mac.com email service (POP and IMAP), iCards online greeting cards, Backup personal backup (to iDisk, CD, or DVD), and McAfee Virex. Later enhancements included an online Mail interface, Back to My Mac remote desktop, Web Gallery, and the ability to add more online web storage and segment it according to purpose.

MobileMe (released 7-9-2008) had a difficult rollout where some users experienced instability over a period of several weeks. Steve Jobs later wrote, “it was a mistake to launch MobileMe at the same time as iPhone 3G, iPhone 2.0 software, and the App Store.” Customers received a free 60-day extension of MobileMe services. Although .Mac removed some services, including iCards and some specific web services, greater iLife integration was added and primary services continued to be expanded and upgraded.

iCloud (beginning Fall 2011) was released with iOS 5 and the iPhone 4S. iCloud includes email, calendar, file across multiple devices, 5 GB of free cloud storage, and offers additional paid tiers for more storage.

For users like me who have been customers since the iTools era, all email domains remain available, including @mac.com, @me.com, and @icloud.com.

This MobileMe software box is from 2008 and features several services on the packaging: online syncing of email, calendar, and contacts; online Photo gallery; online storage; and an image depicting the ability of MobileMe to share files and information among a Mac, iPhone, iPod touch, and Windows via “the Cloud.”

Source: Wikipedia

Apple CD media (1996)

My collection of Apple CD and DVD media includes operating systems, applications, software collections that shipped with devices, promotional media, diagnostic tools, and educational content. In general, Apple-branded CD or DVD examples in original packaging have been presented separately, while single discs or collections of discs are presented chronologically.

Apple CDs from 1996 include:

  • Macintosh System 7.5 Update 2.0 For system software versions 7.5, 7.5.1, and 7.5.2 (U95073-052B, 1996)
  • Apple LaserWriter CD-ROM Version 1.0 For Mac OS and Windows (CD Version 1.0, 691-1229-A, 1996)
  • Apple Color Printing CD (1996)
  • Apple Macintosh CD, Power Macintosh 5260/100 (SSW Version 7.5.3, CD Version 1.0, 691-0992-A, 1996)
  • Macintosh PowerBook 1400 series (SSW Version 7.5.3, CD Version 1.0, 691-0954-A, 1996)
  • Apple Macintosh CD, Macintosh PowerBook System Software for PowerBook 5300/2300/190 computers and PowerPC hardware upgrades (SSW Version 7.5.2, CD Version 1.2.1, 691-0911-A, 1996)
  • Apple Internet Connection Kit (Version 1.1.5, 691-1096-A, 1996)
  • Apple Network Administrator Toolkit (U96073-026A, 1996)

In 1996 Macintosh computer system software was able to fit on a single CD. Apple used a standard white CD envelope with a white cloth-like back and a clear plastic front for system CDs. When multiple CDs were required, each CD shipped in a separate standard envelope.

Apple CD media (2002)

My collection of Apple CD and DVD media includes operating systems, applications, software collections that shipped with devices, promotional media, diagnostic tools, and educational content. In general, Apple-branded CD or DVD examples in original packaging have been presented separately, while single discs or collections of discs are presented chronologically.

Apple CDs from 2002 include:

  • Mac OS X v10.2 Install Disc 2 (Version 10.2, 2Z691-3705-A, 2002)
  • Getting Started with Mac OS X version 10.2 Self-Paced & Practice Files (691-4118-A, 2002)
  • AppleWorks 6 Education Version [Mac OS 8.1 or later (built for Mac OS X) and Windows 95/98/Me/2000/XP, Version 6.2.4, 691-3659-A, 2002]
  • Software Bundle (603-2348-A, iBook Media, 2002)
  • iBook Mac OS 9 Install (Mac OS version 9.2.2, CD version 2.1, 691-3996-A, 2002)
  • Software Bundle (603-2787-A, iBook Media, 2002)
  • eMac OS X Install Disc 1 (Mac OS version 10.3.3, CD version 1.0, 2Z691-4926-A, 2002)
  • eMac OS X Software Restore 9 of 9 (Mac OS X applications, Classic support, CD version 1.0, 2Z691-4933-A, 2002)
  • Software Bundle (603-5097, eMac Media, 2002)

Apple shipped CD bundles in cardboard envelope packages in 2002. Since each computer required a different number of CDs, various envelope sizes were used to accommodate the number of CDs. A white envelope with a light gray Apple logo is used in this example.