iPhone 7 Plus Silicone Case (Denim Blue, 2016)

According to Apple’s website, “Designed by Apple to complement your iPhone, the form of the silicone case fits snugly over the volume buttons, side button, and curves of your device without adding bulk. A soft microfiber lining on the inside helps protect your iPhone. On the outside, the silky, soft-touch finish of the silicone exterior feels great in your hand.”

This case was purchased to protect my iPhone 7 Plus in Jet Black (the gloss black version of the iPhone 7 Plus). The same case also fit the next “Plus” iPhone, the iPhone 8 Plus, and Apple began to refer to the product as the iPhone 8 Plus/7 Plus Silicone Case.

The case was released in Midnight Blue, Pink Sand, Sea Blue, Black, Cocoa, Ocean Blue, Denim Blue, (PRODUCT)RED, Stone, and White.

Source: Apple

USB Mouse (original, Bondi blue, M4848, 1998)

The Apple USB Mouse was first released with the original iMac. The mouse was translucent white and accented in translucent Bondi blue, the same colors as the original iMac. The mouse was round and often referred to as the “hockey puck” mouse. Like previous Apple mouse designs, the USB mouse used a single button and a rubber ball for tracking. However, the rubber ball was two-toned to add design interest by capitalizing on the translucent case.

The mouse has been described as a rare design mistake for Apple because its round shape made it difficult to feel the top of the device, making tracking difficult. Soon after its release, Apple added a dimple in the graphite version of the mouse at the top above the button.

The mouse also had a short cord. Although the cord worked well when plugged into the USB port on a matching iMac keyboard, the cord was too short to use (for right-handed users) with Mac laptops at the time since USB ports were located on the left side.

Source: Wikipedia.com

iBook G3/300 (original, blueberry, 1999)

Following the success of the original iMac, the iBook G3/300 was released as portable Mac for consumers with a radical design. The original iBook was available in blueberry and tangerine, two of the five colors available for iMac at the time. The design is sometimes referred to as the “clamshell.”

The iBook shipped with 32 MB or 64 MB of RAM, a 3.2 GB or 6.0 GB hard drive, and a 12.1-inch TFT active matrix display at 800×600. The case featured a handle on the back that folded out when in use and sprang back into place.

Although portable Mac options were not new at the time with years of PowerBook models that preceded the iBook, Wi-Fi was still not common in 1999. The iBook was available with an optional AirPort wireless networking card. Many consumers who purchased an iBook also likely needed an AirPort Base Station to plug into their modem to set up their first home wireless network.

My first full-time technology director position in a school district is where I first encountered the iBook and AirPort Base Station. The Director of Special Education had purchased an iBook for each Special Education teacher to assist in supporting students with Individualized Educational Plans and deal with the extensive paperwork that is required. Although it is fairly commonplace now for teacher and students to have a technology device assigned to them, in 1999–2000 this practice was considered quite innovative.

This example is a blueberry iBook, complete with an internal AirPort wireless networking card. In my experience, schools in my area tended to purchase the blueberry iBook over the tangerine option.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod nano Generation 4 (8 GB, blue, 2008)

Replacing the “squat” design of the Generation 3, the iPod nano Generation 4 returned to a “skinny” design similar to its predecessors. The new wraparound curved aluminum and glass case was offered in an unprecedented nine colors: silver, black, purple, blue, green, yellow, orange, pink, and (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition. The display was a wide-format 2-inch (diagonal) color LCD display at 320×240.

The iPod nano Generation 4 used either 8 GB or 16 GB of flash memory, capable of storing 2000 or 4000 songs, 7000 or 14,000 photos, and 8 hours or 16 hours of video. All colors were offered for both capacities.

The iPod nano Generation 4 features included an accelerometer (automatically switched to “Cover Flow” navigation in landscape orientation), games and videos only played in landscape, a new Genius feature to dynamically create playlists, and shake-to-shuffle for songs. Accessibility options were added including larger text and spoken menu items. It also included Nike+iPod support, FM radio tagging (using the Apple Radio Remote), support for audio crossfade, and games including Maze, Klondike, and Vortex.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod shuffle Generation 4 (2 GB, blue, 2010, unopened)

The iPod shuffle Generation 4 is a rare example of Apple reversing a design theme and going back to a design closer to a previous design, while still improving upon it. The iPod shuffle Generation 4 has a design similar to the Generation 2 iPod shuffle, but it is smaller and adds a “VoiceOver” feature that reads the name of songs, artists, and playlists out loud. While the Generation 3 iPod shuffle had no controls on the iPod device, the Generation 4 added the clickable ring buttons back to the iPod.

The iPod shuffle Generation 4 was available in five colors: silver (with a black button ring); and blue, green, orange, and pink (with a white button ring). All models have 2 GB of storage, or up to 500 songs.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod nano Generation 5 (16 GB, blue, 2009)

The iPod nano Generation 5 was notable because of its impressive color choices. This model was available in nine colors: (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition, pink, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, silver, and black. The finish for the generation 5 nano is glossy and the case is made of aluminum and glass. It was available with 8 GB or 16 GB of flash memory (2000 or 4000 songs).

This iPod nano also features a video camera with an integrated microphone and speaker that takes advantage of its high-quality 2.2″ TFT display (240×376, 204 ppi). The video quality is H.264 VGA 640×480 at 30 FPS with AAC audio, but it cannot take still photographs. This iPod also has a built-in FM Radio with “live pause,” allowing pause and rewind up to 15 minutes.

My example is blue, and I remember using it as a back-up/additional video camera that had surprisingly good audio for its size.

Source: EveryMac.com