Apple Earphones with Remote and Mic (without Mic for the iPod Shuffle Generation 3, 2009)

These Apple earphones are a bit of an anomaly. The design is based upon its Apple Earphones with Remote and Mic that was sold independently and also included with the iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPhone 4s, and iPod touch (Generation 3). Each of those devices used a microphone. At the same time, Apple released the iPod Shuffle Generation 3 that did not have microphone compatibility. Instead of using an old earphones design, they instead produced the same design without a microphone.

This version of the Apple Earphones with Remote and Mic without a Mic lacks the small Mic hole in the housing on the right-ear wire. Previous Apple Earphone designs lacked the + and – volume controls and the microphone on models that included the Mic.

Of course, I would love to tear these apart or X-ray them to see if Apple left out the microphone, or simply covered the microphone hole in this version of the earphones.

Sources: Apple, Apple (via webarchive)

iPod remote (for iPad Generation 3, unopened, 2004)

According to the iPod User’s Guide (for iPod Generation 3), “Your iPod includes the following components: iPod, 6-pin–to–4-pin FireWire adapter, iPod Dock (with some models), iPod Dock Connector to FireWire Cable, Apple Earphones, iPod Remote (with some models), iPod Power Adapter.”

Thus, this iPod Remote was included with some models of the iPod Generation 3. The iPod Remote uses a two-sided port that includes the headphone port and the iPod Remote port. With the iPod Remote’s dual plugs connected, you must plug your headphones into a second headphone port located on the remote.

The iPod User’s Guide explains: “To use the iPod Remote, connect it to the iPod Remote port, then connect the Apple Earphones (or another set of headphones) to the remote. Use the buttons on the remote just as you would use the iPod buttons.”

The iPod Remote includes a “rocker”-style (side-by-side) button for volume up/down, a play/pause button, a forward button, and a back button. The iPod Remote also includes a clip (to attach the remote to clothing), and Hold slider on the side.

Source: Apple

iPod Remote (for original iPod, 2001)

According to the iPod User’s Guide (for the original iPod), “The iPod Remote is included with some models of iPod and can be purchased separately.”

The iPod Remote includes a “rocker”-style (side-by-side) button for volume up/down, a play/pause button, a forward button, and a back button. The iPod Remote also includes a clip (to attach the remote to clothing), and Hold slider on the side.

The iPod User’s Guide explains its use: “To use the iPod Remote, connect it to iPod’s headphones port, then connect the Apple Earphones (or another set of headphones) to the remote. Use the remote to adjust volume, play or pause a song, fast-forward and rewind, and skip to the next or previous song. Set the remote’s Hold switch to disable the remote’s buttons.”

Source: Apple

Apple TV/Video System (1994)

The Apple TV/Video System was a kit consisting of two hardware components, software, a handheld remote, and user manuals. The system allowed any Apple Power Macintosh, Macintosh Quadra, Macintosh LC, or Macintosh Performa to “Watch TV, capture video images, and create multimedia—all on your Macintosh.”

The specific components in the box included: Apple TV Tuner, Apple Video Player Card, Apple Video Player software, Remote control, and a User’s guide. The box also indicated that “your remote control might look different from the one shown here.” Indeed, the remote pictured on the box is not the one that shipped with any of the systems I have ever seen.

The box also lists the system’s features (in a bulleted list): “Lets you watch TV in a window that appears on the desktop of your Macintosh. Includes a remote control that lets you switch channels, adjust the volume, and control your CD player. Allows you to connect your camcorder or VCR to your Macintosh, and watch the video footage in a window on the display. Lets you capture a single image or a series of images that you can add to reports, letters, and presentations. Features an easy-to-use control panel that gives you one-button image and movie capture. Lets you resize the TV/video window up to the full size of your screen; you can place it anywhere on your desktop.”

Since this system was released before iMovie was created, it also included the Avid VideoShop 3.0 software on CD. At the time, this system was the easiest method for watching TV/video on a Macintosh, and it introduced a low-cost way to edit videos.

I remember that these systems were offered at no additional cost to education with certain Macintosh and Power Macintosh purchases.

Source: Apple

EarPods (with 3.5 mm Headphone Plug, 2012)

The EarPods design replaced a previous Apple headphone design with a circular earphone design. The product description states that, “Unlike traditional, circular earbuds, the design of the EarPods is defined by the geometry of the ear. Which makes them more comfortable for more people than any other earbud-style headphones.”

EarPods also included a remote and microphone on the right EarPod wire. The remote allowed the user to pinch the thickened cord to control volume, play/pause music and video, and answer or end a call.

The same wired EarPod design was used in the EarPods with Lightning Connector product when Apple removed the audio connector from the iPhone. Both the 3.5 mm Headphone Plug and Lightning Connector options were sold at the same time since both ports were still used in Apple products.

This product was sold in a variety of packaging. This is the same packaging that shipped inside iPhone models and also available as OEM replacement parts from some online retailers.

Source: Apple.com

Siri Remote (2015)

The Siri Remote was released in 2015 along with the Apple TV Generation 4. This remote had a glass trackpad, two microphones, and five buttons. The buttons included Menu, Home, Siri, Play/Pause, and a combined Volume up/down button. This remote used both IR and Bluetooth to connect to the Apple TV. The remote also included two sensors for gaming, an accelerometer and a gyroscope.

The finishes of the remote included a matte finish on the trackpad and a smooth, glossy finish at the bottom. The textured finishes helped differentiate the orientation of the remote when using it in the dark or by touch.

The trackpad on the Siri Remote supported limited gestures, including swipe, click, and tap.

Unlike earlier Apple Remotes, the Siri Remote used a built-in rechargeable Lithium Polymer Battery that charged using a Lightning port at the bottom.

The design of this remote was slightly revised after initial production. The original design had a solid black Menu button. The revised design added a white raised ring around the the Menu button.

References: Wikipedia.com, Apple Developer

Apple Remote (aluminum, 2009)

The Apple Remote Generation 2 was made of aluminum and featured a circular button array at the top with two buttons below. The button array had an aluminum button at the center (unmarked) used to select, and four directional buttons on a single ring-shaped button marked with white dots at the top, bottom, right, and left positions. The dots were meant to serve multiple purposes. The up and down buttons could be used as volume up/down or moving up/down on menus, while the left and right buttons could be used as forward/rewind or moving right/left in menus. The two buttons below were marked “Menu” and Play/Pause (using symbols).

The remote was aluminum with black buttons and matched the aluminum iMac at the time. This remote was powered by a CR2032 battery accessed on the back of the remote using a coin.

The design of this remote was slightly revised after initial production. The original design had the ring of buttons flush with the aluminum front. The revised design of the ring button bulges out slightly. This example uses the revised button.

This remote shipped with the first generation Apple TV and could also be used with IR-capable Mac computers. This remote can be configured to pair with a single device.

References: Wikipedia.com, Apple.com, Apple Developer

Apple IR Remotes (c. 1995)

Apple included a few different versions of IR remotes in the various AV kits and expansion cards sold throughout the 1990s. The remotes shown here represented two designs with the same functions. The remotes were not marked as “official” Apple parts, lacking both model numbers and serial numbers.

The buttons include Mute, Power, Volume up, Volume down, Channel up, Channel down, Display, Stop/Eject, TV/Mac, Reverse, Play/Pause, and Forward.

Apple Remote (original, unopened, 2005)

The original Apple Remote had a design resembling the original iPod shuffle. The remote had six buttons. In a circular layout at the top, five buttons included Play/Pause/Select (center), Volume Up, Next/Fast-forward, Volume Down, and Previous/Rewind. A round Menu button was centered below the circular layout. 

The remote was white with a black top. The IR emitter was placed behind the black top. This remote was powered by a CR2032 battery accessed by inserting a thin wire (such as a paper clip) to release a battery “drawer.”

The Apple Remote was designed to navigate Apple’s Front Row multimedia system built into Mac computers at the time. Front Row allowed users to browse and play music in iTunes, view videos saved on the Mac in iTunes, play DVDs, and browse photos in iPhoto. The Front Row system was removed from macOS in Mac OS X version 10.7, but the Apple Remote could continue be used to control Keynote presentations, play movies in QuickTime, and control iTunes.

The original Apple Remote could also control an iPod in an iPod Dock with IR capabilities and the iPod Hi-Fi. 

Early models of the white flat panel iMac included a magnet on the lower-right side to attach the Apple Remote. The iMac Mid-2007 model removed this feature.

These Apple Remote devices are unopened in two different types of packaging. Both shipped along with other Apple devices. I also have several remotes of this style no longer in the packaging.

Reference: Wikipedia.com

iPod Generation 2 (2002)

The iPod Generation 2 was similar to the original iPod in design, but the moving scroll wheel was replaced by a stationary touch-sensitive scroll wheel. In addition, the FireWire port gained a cover. The top of the iPod design also changed to allow the buttons to be surrounded by stainless steel cutouts instead of the plastic top used in the original iPod. Accessories were also added including a wired remote control, a thinner Firewire cable, and a carrying case.

The iPod Generation 2 was offered in 10 GB and 20 GB models and also added Windows compatibility.

Other than the increased hard drive sizes that allowed the iPod to hold up to 4,000 songs in the 20 GB model, the other specifications were the same as the original iPod: a 60-mW amplifier, a FireWire port, and a standard 3.5-mm headphone jack, and a 2-inch black and white backlit LCD display, and a 10-hour battery.

Source: EveryMac.com