Apple CD and DVD media (2004)

My collection of Apple CD and DVD media includes operating systems, applications, software collections that shipped with devices, promotional media, diagnostic tools, and educational content. In general, Apple-branded CD or DVD examples in original packaging have been presented separately, while single discs or collections of discs are presented chronologically.

Apple CDs and DVDs from 2004 include:

  • Mac OS X Panther Version 10.3 Install Disc 1 (Version 10.3.2, 2Z691-4822-A, 2004)
  • GarageBand Jam Pack Install DVD (Version 1.0, 0Z691-4803-A, 2004)
  • Power Mac G5 Software Install and Restore 1 of 2 (Mac OS version 10.3.2, AHT version 2.1.1, DVD version 1.0, 691-4898-A, 2004)
  • Mac OS X Xcode Tools Install Disc (Requires Mac OS X v10.3 or later, Version 1.1, 691-5062-A, 2004)
  • Software Bundle (603-4916-A, PowerBook Media, 2004)
  • Software Bundle (603-4953-A, iBook G4 Media, 2004)
  • iWork ’05 Install DVD (iWork 1.0, 1Z691-5084-A, 2004)
  • Final Cut Express HD Install (Version 3.0, 0Z691-5199-A, 2004)
  • iLife ’05 Install DVD iPhoto 5, iMovie HD, iDVD 5, GarageBand 2, iTunes 4.7 for systems with a DVD drive (Version 5.0, 2Z691-5171-A) (unopened bundle: 603-6443-A iLife ’05 CPU Mini Drop-In Kit, 2004)

Apple shipped CD bundles in cardboard envelope packages up until 2003 when they began using clear plastic bags. In 2004, they were using both types of packaging. The examples here show a white cardboard envelope with a light gray Apple logo and a clear plastic software bundle package.

Also note that by 2004 Apple has mostly switched to using the Myriad Apple font for products, but the Apple Garamond font is still appearing in rare situations.

Power Mac G5 (Dual Core, 2.3 GHz, 2005)

The Power Mac G5 tower represented a major design departure from the four previous Mac “pro” tower designs. The Power Mac G5 used an anodized aluminum alloy case design with a removable side panel that replaced the hinged door on previous Mac towers.

The sides of the Power Mac G5 were solid aluminum with a light gray Apple logo printed on center. The front and back used a pattern of aluminum perforations as design elements, structure, and as part of the ventilation for the internal systems.

This model is a Power Mac G5 Dual Core running at 2.3 GHz. The same design was available in a G5 Dual Core (2.0 GHz) and a G5 Quad Core (2.5 GHz) variation, with all models using 970MP G5 processors with two independent cores on a single chip. This tower included 512 MB or 1 GB RAM (SDRAM), a 250 GB (Serial ATA) hard drive, a 16x dual-layer SuperDrive, and a NVIDIA GeForce 6600 video card.

The front of the tower included a single optical drive, the power button, and three ports: one 3.5 mm headphone jack, one USB port, and a FireWire 400 port.

The back of the tower included four slots. Slot 1 includes two DVI ports (one single-link DVI and one dual-link DVI port), while slots 2–4 are unused. Rear ports include two independent Gigabit Ethernet ports, one FireWire 400 port, one FireWire 800 port, optical digital audio in/out ports, a 3.5 mm line-out audio jack, a 3.5 mm line-in audio jack, and three USB 2.0 ports.

Internally, the tower supports AirPort Extreme (802.11g) and Bluetooth 2.0 wireless protocols. Everymac reports that the inside of Power Mac G5 models were divided into “four different thermal zones with nine computer-controlled fans for optimum cooling.” Also, this Power Mac G5 has two internal hard drives.

The case design with its front and back aluminum perforations and handles is, indeed, reminiscent of a cheese grater—albeit a beautiful one.

Source: Everymac

AirPort External Antenna (for Power Mac G5, 2005)

The Power Macintosh G5 from 2005 allowed a wireless network connection using an internal AirPort Extreme card. Since the Power Macintosh G5 had an external aluminum case, this external AirPort antenna was included.

The back of the Power Macintosh G5 included a proprietary port, the AirPort Extreme antenna port:

AirPort Extreme antenna port—Connect the AirPort Extreme antenna to this port if your Macintosh has an optional AirPort Extreme Card installed.”

This AirPort Extreme antenna port is unopened in its original packaging.

Source: Apple

Apple Mouse (white, M5769, 2003)

The Apple Mouse was very similar in design to the Apple Pro Mouse released in 2000. However, the Apple Mouse was white and removed the ability for the user to control the click-force setting on the bottom of the mouse.

The surface of this mouse was crystal clear acrylic with a base insert in white that matched the keyboard that shipped with it.

This mouse was included with the Power Mac G4 (mirrored drive door), Power Mac G5, eMac, iMac G4, and iMac G5. 

Source: Wikipedia.com

Apple Mouse (white, unopened, M5769, 2003)

The Apple Mouse was very similar in design to the Apple Pro Mouse released in 2000. However, the Apple Mouse was white and removed the ability for the user to control the click-force setting on the bottom of the mouse. The surface of this mouse was crystal clear acrylic with a base insert in white that matched the keyboard that shipped with it.

This mouse was included with the Power Mac G4 (mirrored drive door), Power Mac G5, eMac, iMac G4, and iMac G5. 

Source: Wikipedia.com