MacBook Air 11-inch (2014)

This MacBook Air 11-inch featured a 22-nm Haswell 1.4 GHz Intel Core i5 processor. It included 4 GB or 8 GB of memory and 128 GB or 256 GB of flash storage. This was the smallest of Apple’s MacBook Air line of laptops measuring 0.11 to 0.68 inches and weighed 2.3 pounds. It included a 720p FaceTime HD webcam, a backlit full-size keyboard, and an 11.6-inch widescreen TFT LED backlit active-matrix glossy display (1366×768).

Wireless connectivity included 802.11ac Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.0, while ports included analog audio out, one Thunderbolt port, and two USB 3.0 ports.

A previous version of the MacBook Air 11-inch nearly identical except for a slower processor and less available RAM and flash storage.

In my role as Assistant Superintendent for Technology & Innovation, I led the teams that managed nearly 4,500 of these laptops over a five-year period (2014–19). At the time, all high school students in the school district were issued a MacBook Air 11-inch and students used the same model for their 4-year high school career. Apple stopped manufacturing this laptop in 2018 and the high school switched to the iPad Generation 6.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPhone 4S (2011)

The iPhone 4S was the product that first introduced the Siri voice assistant. The iPhone 4S was designed around a stainless-steel body with a glass front and back. It had a 3.5-inch LED-backlit 960×640 326 ppi multi-touch Retina display and included two noise-cancelling microphones. It was available in black or white.

The iPhone 4S supported both GSM and CDMA networks and included 802.11b/g/n and Bluetooth 4.0. It used a dual-core Apple A5 processor; 512 MB of RAM; and 8 GB, 16 GB, 32 GB, or 64 GB of internal storage. It had two cameras: an 8 megapixel HD camera (1080p at 30 FPS) with an LED flash on the rear and FaceTime camera on the front that allowed FaceTime video calls over Wi-Fi.

Source: EveryMac.com

Apple Pro Mouse (original, unopened, M5769, 2000)

The Apple Pro Mouse was introduced in 2000 along with the G4 Cube. This mouse dropped the rubber ball used for tracking in all previous Apple mouse designs and replaced it with a solid-state LED optical sensor. The design of the mouse appeared to have no buttons, but the entire mouse surface allowed for a single click. The shape of the mouse was an an elongated rectangle with two round sides (replacing the previous round design).

The surface of this mouse was crystal clear acrylic with a base insert in black that matched the keyboard that shipped with it.

The Apple Pro Mouse also included a ring to allow for three different click force settings on the underside of the mouse.

Source: Wikipedia.com

Apple Pro Mouse (white, M5769, 2000)

The Apple Pro Mouse was introduced in 2000 along with the G4 Cube. This mouse dropped the rubber ball used for tracking in all previous Apple mouse designs and replaced it with a solid-state LED optical sensor. The design of the mouse appeared to feature no buttons, but the entire mouse surface allowed for a single click. The shape of the mouse was an an elongated rectangle with two round sides (replacing the previous round design).

The surface of the original version of this mouse was crystal clear acrylic with a base insert in black that matched the keyboard that shipped with it. This version replaced the black insert with a white insert, and the bottom of the mouse used a translucent white screen.

The Apple Pro Mouse also included a ring to allow for three different click force settings on the underside of the mouse.

The successor to the Apple Pro Mouse was called the Apple Mouse and the ring on the underside that controlled the click settings was removed. The bottom of the mouse was replaced with opaque white plastic and a light gray gliding surface (shown below).

Source: Wikipedia.com

Apple Pro Mouse (original, M5769, 2000)

The Apple Pro Mouse was introduced in 2000 along with the G4 Cube. This mouse dropped the rubber ball used for tracking in all previous Apple mouse designs and replaced it with a solid-state LED optical sensor. The design of the mouse appeared to feature no buttons, but the entire mouse surface allowed for a single click. The shape of the mouse was an an elongated rectangle with two round sides (replacing the previous round design).

The surface of this mouse was crystal clear acrylic with a base insert in black that matched the keyboard that shipped with it. The original translucent gray/silver cable was less rugged than the mouse with a white cable that replaced it in 2003. Both examples are shown below.

The Apple Pro Mouse also included a ring to allow for three different click force settings on the underside of the mouse.

Source: Wikipedia.com

iPhone 4 (2010)

The iPhone 4 represented a major design leap from the previous models with an all stainless steel body, a 3.5-inch Retina display at 960×640 (326 ppi), a chemically hardened “aluminosilcate” over the front display, and the chemically hardened black glass back. A white option was announced, but did not ship for over a year after the announcement.

The iPhone 4 was the first iPhone with dual front and back cameras: a 5 megapixel HD video/still camera (720p at 30 FPS), a 5X digital zoom, and an LED flash on the rear; and a VGA-quality video/still camera on the front designed for video conferencing over Wi-Fi using FaceTime. Both cameras used noise-cancelling microphones.

The iPhone 4 was powered by an A4 processor and added additional mobile network support. It included a digital compass, GPS, an accelerometer, and a new 3-axis gyroscope.

Source: EveryMac.com