Apple Earphones with Remote and Mic (without Mic for the iPod Shuffle Generation 3, 2009)

These Apple earphones are a bit of an anomaly. The design is based upon its Apple Earphones with Remote and Mic that was sold independently and also included with the iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPhone 4s, and iPod touch (Generation 3). Each of those devices used a microphone. At the same time, Apple released the iPod Shuffle Generation 3 that did not have microphone compatibility. Instead of using an old earphones design, they instead produced the same design without a microphone.

This version of the Apple Earphones with Remote and Mic without a Mic lacks the small Mic hole in the housing on the right-ear wire. Previous Apple Earphone designs lacked the + and – volume controls and the microphone on models that included the Mic.

Of course, I would love to tear these apart or X-ray them to see if Apple left out the microphone, or simply covered the microphone hole in this version of the earphones.

Sources: Apple, Apple (via webarchive)

iPod shuffle Dock (for Generation 2 iPod shuffle, 2006)

Apple introduced the Generation 2 iPod shuffle in September 2006 and advertised it as “the most wearable iPod ever,” due to a clip on the back that could easily attach the iPod shuffle to clothing.

The iPod shuffle was so small that the 30-pin iPod dock could not be used to charge or transfer music and data to the device. Instead, the Generation 2 iPod shuffle used this iPod shuffle Dock. The dock connected to a computer with an attached USB cable and data transfer and recharging was handled through the dock’s headphone jack.

The iPod shuffle Dock was only available in white, even though the iPod shuffle was available in several colors [silver, two variations of pink, orange, green, and blue; and turquoise, lavender, mint green, and (PRODUCT)RED].

Source: Wikipedia

iPod shuffle (original, 512 MB, 2005)

The original iPod shuffle featured 512 MB or 1.0 GB of flash memory in a 3.3 by 0.98 by 0.33-inch case with an integrated USB connector. Like all iPod shuffle models, it lacked a display. The name of the iPod refers to its ability to shuffle among the 120 or 240 songs its capable of storing.

Like other iPod models, the shuffle can be used to store files other than music files, a feature that worked particularly well on the original shuffle with its integrated USB port.

The original iPod shuffle shipped with a white lanyard and a cap.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod shuffle Generation 3 (4 GB, stainless steel, 2009, unopened)

The iPod shuffle Generation 3 was released in two stages. The initial release came in black and silver, and a later release added blue, green, pink, and an all-stainless-steel “Special Edition.”

The design of the iPod shuffle Generation 3 was considered somewhat controversial because it had no external screen or controls. The three controls—volume up, volume down, and “action”—are all on the earphone cable. VoiceOver technology, accessed using the “action” control, spoke song information.

This example is an unopened stainless steel Special Edition. It was only offered in a 4 GB capacity, and was only available at Apple Stores.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod shuffle Generation 2 (1 GB, orange, 2007)

This version of the iPod shuffle Generation 2 was updated to include five colors: silver (original), orange, green, blue, and pink. Also, this revision switch from the old-style “cap” earbuds to the current, more streamlined design. The case of this iPod shuffle features a clip that allows you to easily attach it to clothing.

This iPod shuffle’s design greatly differs from the original iPod shuffle that looked and functioned similarly to a flash drive. To charge this iPod shuffle and load it with up to 240 songs, it sits in a very small USB base with a protruding 3.5mm jack that uses the audio jack to transfer data and charging power.

The iPod shuffle is the only set of iPod models with no display.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod shuffle Generation 4 (2 GB, blue, 2010, unopened)

The iPod shuffle Generation 4 is a rare example of Apple reversing a design theme and going back to a design closer to a previous design, while still improving upon it. The iPod shuffle Generation 4 has a design similar to the Generation 2 iPod shuffle, but it is smaller and adds a “VoiceOver” feature that reads the name of songs, artists, and playlists out loud. While the Generation 3 iPod shuffle had no controls on the iPod device, the Generation 4 added the clickable ring buttons back to the iPod.

The iPod shuffle Generation 4 was available in five colors: silver (with a black button ring); and blue, green, orange, and pink (with a white button ring). All models have 2 GB of storage, or up to 500 songs.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod shuffle Generation 2 (1 GB, silver, 2007)

This version of the iPod shuffle Generation 2 was updated to include five colors: silver (original), orange, green, blue, and pink. Also, this revision switch from the old-style “cap” earbuds to the current, more streamlined design. The case of this iPod shuffle features a clip that allows you to easily attach it to clothing.

This iPod shuffle’s design greatly differs from the original iPod shuffle that looked and functioned similarly to a flash drive. To charge this iPod shuffle and load it with up to 240 songs, it sits in a very small USB base with a protruding 3.5mm jack that uses the audio jack to transfer data and charging power.

The iPod shuffle is the only iPod with no display.

Source: EveryMac.com