TBWA Chiat/Day magazine spread set (1999–2000)

This set includes five magazine spreads printed on 18 x 14.1875 paper and laminated. Each magazine spread is labeled at bottom-center with “TBWA CHIAT/DAY INC. LA” (Apple’s ad agency at the time) and a code number. The spreads feature slot-loading iMac computers and one features the tangerine iBook.

Q200-99-P2618AO features the tangerine iBook with the tagline “iMac to go.” (1999)

Q200-99-3172A features the lime slot-loading iMac with the tagline “And the award for Best Home Movie goes to…” (1999)

Q200-99-3502A features the grape slot-loading iMac with the tagline “Baywatch Baby” (2000)

Q200-99-P3739A features the tangerine slot-loading iMac with the tagline “Rock‘n Roll Machine” (2000)

Q200-99-P3740A features the lime slot-loading iMac with the tagline “Leapin’ Lizards.” (2000)

The iBook magazine spread introduces the iBook laptop and touts its built-in 56K modem as “the world’s easiest path to the Internet.”

All iMac magazine spreads feature slot-loading iMac models and DV camcorders with “Desktop Video” or “Desktop Movies.” Apple mentions the iMovie app in three of the four ads, but the main purpose of the ads is to show the ease of using the iMac to create videos, a relatively cumbersome task before Apple introduced FireWire and iMovie.

Unfortunately, I have no idea where I acquired these magazine spreads. I’m not now—nor have ever been—in the publishing, printing, or advertising business. If anyone has additional history on these, I’d appreciate it!

The Apple Store Holiday 2004 catalog (2004)

I remember picking up this catalog at an Apple Store in 2004. It is large for a catalog at 11 x 17 inches and is printed on heavy matte paper. Each spread features “lifestyle” photos of people using then-current Apple products in everyday settings. Each product is then described in detail including features, uses, and available peripherals. Full-page “case studies” from regular people using the products in real life are also included.

The first product featured is iPod. The 2004 models included iPod with scroll wheel (with a monochrome display), iPod Photo (color display), and iPod mini (monochrome display and available in four colors).

The next spread highlights the iMac G5. These were Apple’s second flat-panel iMac models that were available with 17 or 20-inch “widescreen flat panel” displays. The iLife apps are mentioned here in holiday contexts.

Apple “notebooks” are shown next, including the white 12 and 14-inch iBook models and the 12, 15, and 17-inch PowerBook G4 models. The AirPort Express is mentioned as a solution for streaming music and wireless printing in the home.

The last 2-page spread includes “A day in the life of a Genius,” and highlights in-store workshops and presentations.

The back page shows a map of the United States and the locations of all Apple Stores worldwide. Six happy Apple customers are also featured with their Apple Store purchases across the US.

Education Resource CD Winter 2000 (2000)

This Education Resource CD is dated Winter 2000. Its design features a rendition of the glossy 3D tabs on the apple.com website at the time. The toolbox image at the bottom of the CD matched the iTools design. iTools is a precursor to what has become Apple iCloud services.

Apple CD media (1999)

My collection of Apple CD and DVD media includes operating systems, applications, software collections that shipped with devices, promotional media, diagnostic tools, and educational content. In general, Apple-branded CD or DVD examples in original packaging have been presented separately, while single discs or collections of discs are presented chronologically.

Apple CDs from 1999 include:

  • Mac OS 8.6 Updater CD (1999)
  • Mac OS 8.6 (Version 8.6, 691-2312-A, 1999)
  • Mac OS 9 (Version 9.0, 691-2386-A, 1999)
  • Macintosh PowerBook G3 Series Software Install (SSW version 9.0, 691-2458-A, 1999)
  • iMac Software Install (SSW version 8.6, CD version 1.1, 691-2376-A, 1999)
  • iMac Software Restore (SSW version 8.6, CD version 1.1, 691-2375-A, 1999)
  • Software Bundle (600-7647-A, 1999)
  • iBook Software Install (SSW version 9.0, 691-2472-A, 1999)
  • Apple Network Assistant (Version 4.0., Z691-2474-A, 1999)
  • SoftRAID For Power Mac G4 and Macintosh Server G4 computers (1999, SSW version 9.0, CD version 2.2.1, 691-2534-A, 1999)
  • AppleCare Service Source For Power Macintosh computers before G3 (includes AppleCare License Booklet, November 691-2508-A, 1999)

Apple shipped CD bundles in cardboard envelope packages in 1999. The envelope design shown here is orange with a white Apple logo.

Apple CD media (2002)

My collection of Apple CD and DVD media includes operating systems, applications, software collections that shipped with devices, promotional media, diagnostic tools, and educational content. In general, Apple-branded CD or DVD examples in original packaging have been presented separately, while single discs or collections of discs are presented chronologically.

Apple CDs from 2002 include:

  • Mac OS X v10.2 Install Disc 2 (Version 10.2, 2Z691-3705-A, 2002)
  • Getting Started with Mac OS X version 10.2 Self-Paced & Practice Files (691-4118-A, 2002)
  • AppleWorks 6 Education Version [Mac OS 8.1 or later (built for Mac OS X) and Windows 95/98/Me/2000/XP, Version 6.2.4, 691-3659-A, 2002]
  • Software Bundle (603-2348-A, iBook Media, 2002)
  • iBook Mac OS 9 Install (Mac OS version 9.2.2, CD version 2.1, 691-3996-A, 2002)
  • Software Bundle (603-2787-A, iBook Media, 2002)
  • eMac OS X Install Disc 1 (Mac OS version 10.3.3, CD version 1.0, 2Z691-4926-A, 2002)
  • eMac OS X Software Restore 9 of 9 (Mac OS X applications, Classic support, CD version 1.0, 2Z691-4933-A, 2002)
  • Software Bundle (603-5097, eMac Media, 2002)

Apple shipped CD bundles in cardboard envelope packages in 2002. Since each computer required a different number of CDs, various envelope sizes were used to accommodate the number of CDs. A white envelope with a light gray Apple logo is used in this example.

Apple CD and DVD media (2003)

My collection of Apple CD and DVD media includes operating systems, applications, software collections that shipped with devices, promotional media, diagnostic tools, and educational content. In general, Apple-branded CD or DVD examples in original packaging have been presented separately, while single discs or collections of discs are presented chronologically.

Apple CDs and DVDs from 2003 include:

  • iBook Mac OS X Install Disc 1 (Mac OS version 10.2.3, CD version 1.0, 2Z691-4282-A, 2003)
  • AppleWorks 6 Education Version (Mac OS X, Mac OS 8.1 or later, Windows 95/98/Me/2000/XP, Version 6.2.7, 691-4415-A, 2003)
  • .Mac (Version 2.0, 0Z691-4421-A, 2003)
  • iTunes 4 Installer CD with QuickTime 6.2 (Built for Mac OS X v10.1.5 or later, 2003)
  • iTunes 3, iPhoto 2, iMovie 3, iDVD 3 Install DVD For systems with a SuperDrive (Version 1.0, 2Z691-4302-A, 2003)
  • iTunes 3, iPhoto 2, iMovie 3 Install CD For systems without a SuperDrive (Version 1.0, 2Z691-4301-A, 2003)
  • Keynote (Version 1.0, 691-4149-A, 2003)
  • Wireless Keyboard and Mouse Software (Built for Mac OS X v10.2.6 or later, Version 1.1, 2Z691-4661-A, 2003)
  • iMac Software Install and Restore (Mac OS version 10.2.3, DVD version 1.1, 691-4319-A, 2003)
  • AirPort Software Installation (unopened, CD Version 3.0.4, 691-4420-A)
  • Power Mac G4 Software Install and Restore (Mac OS version 10.2.3, DVD version 1.1, 691-4309-A, 2003)
  • Software Bundle (Power Mac G4, 603-2795, 2003)
  • Software Bundle (PowerBook G4 Media, 603-2714-A, 2003)
  • Mac OS X Xcode Tools Install Disc (Requires Mac OS X v10.3 or later, Version 1.0, 691-4591-A, 2003)

Previous software bundles were packaged in cardboard envelopes. In 2003 Apple changed to packaging software bundles in clear plastic packaging, shown here.

Apple CD media (2000)

My collection of Apple CD and DVD media includes operating systems, applications, software collections that shipped with devices, promotional media, diagnostic tools, and educational content. In general, Apple-branded CD or DVD examples in original packaging have been presented separately, while single discs or collections of discs are presented chronologically.

Apple CDs from 2000 include:

  • iMac Software Restore (SSW version 9.0.3, 691-2524-A, 2000)
  • Software Bundle (600-9396-A, iMac Media, 2000)
  • iMac Software Restore 1 of 4 (Mac OS versions 9.2, 10.0.4; CD version 1.0; 691-3177-A; 2000)
  • iMac Applications (CD version 1.3, 691-3195-A, 2000)
  • Software Bundle (600-7881-A, 2000)
  • Software Bundle (600-9194, Power Mac G4 Media, 2000)
  • Software Bundle (600-8137A, 2000)
  • iMac Software Restore (SSW version 9.0.4, CD version 1.1, 691-2704-A, 2000)
  • iMac Software Install (SSW version 9.0.4, CD version 1.1, 691-2703-A, 2000)
  • Software Bundle (600-7837A, 2000)
  • iBook Software Restore (SSW version 9.0.4, 691-2633-A, 2000)
  • iMovie 2 (Version 2.0, Z691-2515-A, 2000)
  • iMovie 2 (Version 2.0.1, Z691-2764-B, 2000)
  • AppleWorks 6 For Mac OS (Version 6.0, Z691-2344-A, 2000)
  • Mac OS 9 (Version 9.1, 691-2746-A, 2000)

Apple shipped CD bundles in cardboard envelope packages in 2000. Since each computer required a different number of CDs, various envelope sizes were used to accommodate the number of CDs. At least two different envelope designs were used in 2000: a white envelope with a graphite Apple logo and a blue/gray envelope with a white Apple logo.

Stickers for programmable function keys (for original iBook, 1999)

The original “clamshell” iMac shipped with a set of Stickers for programmable function keys in various icon designs. These stickers were designed to be used above the top row of F (function) keys across the top of the iBook.

Many of the iBook F-keys were pre-assigned:
F1 and F2—brightness (down and up)
F3 and F4—volume (down and up)
F5—num lock (number lock to allow use of a built-in number keypad)
F6—mute

However, the F7–F13 keys were unassigned. Using the Keyboard System Preferences, users could easily assign functions to these keys. The set of stickers were included to allow users to mark the functions with a custom sticker to help them remember the key’s function.

Although these stickers shipped with all original iBook “clamshell” laptops (blueberry, tangerine, graphite, indigo, and key lime), I have found no Apple documentation that explains their use. I have two versions of the stickers, a blue-gray set from the original iBook release, and a light gray version from the later iBook models.

Source: EveryMac

iBook Power Adapter (1999)

This iBook Power Adapter is for the original iBook models (1999–2001) with the “clamshell” design. The model number is M7387LL/A.

The iBook Power Adapter is in two parts. The round silver “yo-yo” part has a white Apple logo and allows the thin cord that plugs into the iBook power port to wrap around the inside of the circle for storage. The part of the cord that plugs into the wall is primarily white with transparent ends, allowing the internal wiring to be visible. This transparent design aesthetic is consistent with the translucent plastics used on both the iBook and the color iMac models of the time.

This iBook Power Adapter is stored in its original packaging.

AirPort Base Station (original, 1999)

The original AirPort Base Station was released along with the original iBook (blueberry and tangerine) at the 1999 MacWorld conference and expo in New York City. An optional AirPort card was available for the iBook (a repackaged Lucent ORiNOCO Gold Card PC Card adapter) and this graphite AirPort Base Station provided one of the first consumer WiFi base stations that was relatively easy to set up and manage.

The original AirPort system including the AirPort card and AirPort Base Station allowed transfer rates up to 11 Megabits/second.

Soon after MacWorld, Apple began airing a TV commercial for the AirPort Base Station featuring a 1950s-style Sci-Fi soundtrack and the base station flying in like a flying saucer.

Sources: Wikipedia, Museums Victoria (Australia)