Education Resource CD Winter 2000 (2000)

This Education Resource CD is dated Winter 2000. Its design features a rendition of the glossy 3D tabs on the apple.com website at the time. The toolbox image at the bottom of the CD matched the iTools design. iTools is a precursor to what has become Apple iCloud services.

Power Mac G4 (1.0 GHz, “Quicksilver,” 2002)

The Power Macintosh G4/1.0 GHz was nicknamed “Quicksilver” because of its new silver color and its significant speed upgrades from the previous graphite G4 model. Internally, it included dual 1.0 GHz PowerPC 7450 (or 7455) G4 processors, 512 MB RAM, an 80 GB hard drive, and a wireless connection was available with the addition of an optional AirPort (802.11b) card. A few Quicksilver models were available with different levels of processors, drive capacities, and RAM options.

The front of the Power Macintosh G4 “Quicksilver” was opaque silver (replacing translucent plastics of previous designs). The top included spaces for two optical drives. This example includes a DVD-ROM drive in the top space and no device in the lower space. Below the optical drives was the power button, and two additional smaller buttons—reset and “interrupt” buttons—both used to recover from system-level issues. The bottom-center features a prominent chrome-finished speaker (without a protective grille).

The ports on the back included stacked headphone and line-out speaker 3.5 mm jacks; a modem (telephone) port; one ethernet port; two FireWire (400) ports; and two USB ports. Five slots were also available. This model included slot 1 with a standard VGA port and a proprietary ADC (Apple Display Connector) port, while slots 2–5 are unused.

The right side of the tower included a latch with a circular rubberized grip that allowed the entire side of the tower to be opened on a hinge, revealing and providing relatively easy access to all internal components. Plug-in slots (such as video, memory, and wireless) were attached to the hinged side, while components such as drives and fans remained attached to the internal metal frame of the tower.

The four corners of this tower serve as feet and/or handles. They are cast in crystal clear acrylic.

Source: Everymac

Macintosh Server G4 (500 MHz, 1999)

The Macintosh Server G4/500 was designed similarly as its G3 blue and white predecessor, but used a translucent graphite and white case. Internally, it had a 500 MHz PowerPC 7400 G4 processor, 256 MB RAM (512 GB RAM maximum), an 18.0 GB (or 36.0 GB) hard drive, a 5X DVD-ROM drive, and a Rage 128 Pro graphics card. This server is identical to the Power Macintosh G4 series tower, but included faster hard drives, more RAM, and shipped with a server operating system. The two Apple server operating systems of the time included MacOS 8.6 with AppleShare IP 6.3.1 and MacOS X Server.

The front of the Macintosh Server G4 was translucent graphite (gray) with an underlying pinstripe pattern. The top included spaces for two optical drives. This example includes a DVD-ROM drive and no device in the lower available space. Below the optical drives was a speaker, the power button, and two additional smaller buttons—reset and “interrupt” buttons—both used to recover from system-level issues.

The back of the tower included all ports: two FireWire (400) ports, one ethernet port, two USB ports, and stacked 3.5 mm microphone (audio-in) and audio-out jacks. A space for a modem port is included, but unused in this example. Four slots were also available. This model includes slot 1 with a standard VGA port and a DVI port; slot 2 with a high-speed SCSI (LVD/SE) port; while slots 3 and 4 are unused.

The right side of the tower included a latch with a circular rubberized grip that allowed the entire side of the tower to be opened on a hinge, revealing and providing relatively easy access to all internal components. Plug-in slots (such as video, memory, and wireless) were attached to the hinged side, while components such as drives and fans remained attached to the internal metal frame of the tower.

This Macintosh Server G4 includes three internal hard drives.

Source: Everymac

iBook G4 (Mid-2005, 2005)

The iBook G4 (Mid-2005) featured a 1.33 GHz PowerPC G4 processor, 512 MB of RAM, a 40 GB Ultra ATA/100 hard drive, a slot-loading DVD-ROM/CD-RW Combo drive, and standard AirPort Extreme (802.11g)/Bluetooth 2.0. The screen was a 12.1-inch TFT XGA active matrix display at 1024×768. The case was opaque white, rather than the translucent white used in earlier iBook models. 

This iBook model added a Sudden Motion Sensor and scrolling trackpad. The Sudden Motion Sensor stopped the hard drive from spinning if the iBook was dropped, thus minimizing damage and potential data loss. This was the first consumer-level Apple laptop to gain scrolling trackpad features, allowing users to use two-finger scrolling and two-fingering panning (a feature first introduced in PowerBook G4 laptops).

This and other iBook models were used extensively in the schools where I served as Technology Director among teachers and students. At the time, 1:1 laptop programs had just been adopted in a few school districts (where every student is issued a laptop for learning throughout the school day). At the time of the iBook G4, only one public school district in Chicago’s North Shore had adopted a 1:1 program for students, while most school districts had begun to issue laptops to staff and administrators.

References: EveryMac.com

iMac G4/1.25 20-inch (2003)

The iMac G4/1.25 20-inch Flat Panel featured a 1.25 GHz PowerPC 7445 (G4) processor, 256 MB of RAM (333 MHz PC2700 DDR SDRAM), an 80.0 GB Ultra ATA/100 hard drive (7200 RPM), a tray-loading 4X SuperDrive, support for AirPort Extreme (802.11g)/Bluetooth with optional cards, and a 20-inch TFT Active Matrix LCD display at 1680×1050.

The internal components of this iMac are contained in a 10.6-inch half-sphere. Protruding from the top of the half sphere was a chrome stainless steel neck supporting the display. This design is sometimes referred to as the “sunflower iMac.” In addition to the polished stainless steel, the case and display are “ice white.” It shipped with two clear spherical external Apple Pro Speakers.

This iMac shipped with MacOS X 10.3 Panther and cannot boot into “Classic Mode” (MacOS 9).

Source: EveryMac.com

iMac G4/700 15-inch (flat panel, 2002)

The iMac G4/700 (Flat Panel) featured a 700 MHz PowerPC 7441 (G4) processor, 128 MB or 256 MB of RAM (PC133 SDRAM), a 40.0 GB Ultra ATA/66 hard drive (5400 RPM), either a tray-loading CD-RW drive or DVD-ROM/CD-RW Combo Drive, and a 15-inch TFT Active Matrix LCD display.

The internal components of this iMac are contained in a 10.6-inch half-sphere. Protruding from the top of the half sphere was a chrome stainless steel neck supporting the display. This design is sometimes referred to as the “sunflower iMac.” In addition to the polished stainless steel, the case and display are “ice white.” This iMac also included a matching ice white Apple Pro Keyboard and Mouse. The more expensive Combo Drive configuration of this iMac shipped with two clear spherical external Apple Pro Speakers.

This iMac shipped with MacOS X 10.1 and MacOS 9.2 installed with MacOS X selected as the default OS. 

Source: EveryMac.com

PowerBook G4 1.33 12-inch (2004)

The PowerBook G4 12-inch featured a 1.33 GHz PowerPC 7447a (G4) processor, 256 MB of DDR SDRAM, a 60 GB Ultra ATA/100 hard drive (4200 RPM), a slot-loading 8X Combo drive or a 4X SuperDrive, and Bluetooth 1.1/AirPort Extreme (802.11g). The case was made of an aluminum alloy. The 12.1-inch TFT XGA display was 1024×768 pixels. The small size offered considerable computing power in a highly mobile package.

The PowerBook G4 1.33 was similar to its predecessor (PowerBook G4/1.0 12-inch), but had a new logic board design and faster performance.

Source: EveryMac.com

PowerBook G4 1.33 17-inch (2003)

The PowerBook G4/1.33 17-inch was among the first aluminum PowerBook laptops. The PowerBook G4/1.33 17-inch featured a 1.33 GHz PowerPC 7447 (G4) processor, 512 MB of PC2700 DDR SDRAM, an 80 GB Ultra ATA/100 hard drive (4200 RPM), a slot-loading 2X DVD-R/CD-RW SuperDrive, a FireWire 800 port, built-in Bluetooth 1.1 and AirPort Extreme (802.11g), and an ambient light sensor keyboard. The 17-inch widescreen TFT display was at 1440×900 resolution, a quite large display for a laptop.

The previous PowerBook G4/1.0 17-inch laptop had a slightly slower processor, a smaller hard drive, and a lower resolution graphics card. This PowerBook G4/1.33 17-inch upgraded the USB ports to the USB 2.0 standard.

This and all 17-inch PowerBook laptops at the time were near-perfect portable solutions for graphic artists and filmmakers. The high performance of these laptops allowed them to run the most recent versions of Adobe Photoshop and Apple Final Cut Pro, allowing creatives to flexibility to work anywhere with the same power available on desktop computers at the time with a very large display.

Source: EveryMac.com


eMac (2003)

The eMac was released in 2002 as the final CRT-based all-in-one Mac. It was manufactured for a relatively long time—just over 4 years—and was discontinued in 2006. Although the design is similar to the CRT iMac, it lacks a handle and was extremely difficult to move with a weight of 50 pounds. In addition, the screen size is larger than the original iMac and the eMac features a G4 processor, making it significantly faster.

The eMac was intended to be an education-only Mac, but its popularity, power, and lower price made it attractive to the consumer market. When the eMac was released, the second-generation iMac had just been introduced with a flat-panel display on an adjustable chrome arm. At the time, LCD screens were considerably more expensive than CRT screens so an eMac could be purchased for $999, while second-generation iMac cost $1,299.

The eMac in my collection was manufactured in 2003. Almost 10 years after I acquired my eMac, I was able to get an Apple eMac Tilt and Swivel Stand (M8784G/A). The stand is attached to the bottom of the eMac to both raise it to a more comfortable viewing height and allow it to easily tilt.

Information adapted from EveryMac.com.