45W MagSafe 2 Power Adapter (OEM packaging, 2019)

This Apple 45W MagSafe 2 Power Adapter was designed for the MacBook Air laptops including MacBook Air (13-inch, Early 2015–2017) and the MacBook Air (11-inch, Early 2015). It could be used with any Mac laptop with the MagSafe 2 adapter, but may not charge as optimally as power adapters with higher wattages.

Apple describes the power adapter:

“The 45W MagSafe 2 Power Adapter features a magnetic DC connector so if someone should trip over it, the cord disconnects harmlessly and your MacBook Air stays put safely. It also helps prevent fraying or weakening of the cables over time. In addition, the magnetic DC helps guide the plug into the system for a quick and secure connection.”

Further, “Designed to be the perfect traveling companion, the adapter has a clever design which allows the DC cable to be wound neatly around itself for easy cable storage.”

This particular 45W MagSafe 2 Power Adapter is an Apple OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) part. It ships in a cardboard box with black cardboard and clear plastic wraps instead of the white retail box.

Source: Apple

Thunderbolt to Gigabit Ethernet Adapter (unopened, 2012)

According to Apple, the Apple Thunderbolt to Gigabit Ethernet Adapter “lets you easily connect to a high-performance Gigabit Ethernet network. Small and compact, it connects to the Thunderbolt port on your Mac computer and provides an RJ-45 port that supports 10/100/1000BASE-T networks.”

This adapter can be used with Apple computers with a Thunderbolt port, including MacBook Air (13-inch, Early 2015–2017), MacBook Air (11-inch, Early 2015), MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2012–2015), MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2012–2015), iMac (Retina 4K, 21.5-inch, Late 2015), iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2014–2015), Mac Pro (Late 2013), and Mac mini (Late 2014).

Source: Apple

Mini-DVI to VGA adapter

Beginning in 2005, Apple released several computers with a Mini-DVI port, including the 12-inch PowerBook G4, Intel-based iMac, the MacBook Intel-based laptop, the Intel-based Xserve, the 2009 Mac mini, and some late model eMac computers.

The port was used until 2008 when it was replaced with the Mini DisplayPort. This adapter allows a Mac with a Mini-DVI port to be connected to a VGA display.

Sources: EveryMac, Wikipedia

iPod 6-pin–to–4-pin FireWire Adapter (for iPod Generation 3, 2003)

The iPod 6-pin–to–4-pin FireWire Adapter was specifically included with the iPod Generation 3 (Dock Connector) to make it compatible with Windows computers. According to the iPod User’s Guide:

To use iPod with a Windows PC, you must have:
• A Windows PC with 500 MHz or higher processor speed
• Windows 2000 with Service Pack 4 or later, or Windows XP Home or Professional
• iTunes 4.2 or later (iTunes is included on the iPod CD). To be sure you have the latest version of iTunes, go to www.apple.com/itunes.
• iPod software (included on the iPod CD)
• Built-in FireWire or a FireWire card installed, or built-in USB 2.0 or a USB 2.0 card and the optional iPod Dock Connector to USB 2.0 + FireWire Cable

Although all Mac computers at the time had a 6-pin FireWire port built in, Windows computers had many different possible ports. For Windows, the iPod Generation 3 could support three connectors: USB port (USB 2.0 recommended), 6-pin FireWire 400 port (IEEE 1394), or 4-pin FireWire 400 port (with included adapter).

The 4-pin FireWire adapter only supported data transfer, it could not charge the iPod.

Source: Apple (manual, Identify your iPod model)

Macintosh Display (DA-15) to VGA Adapters (platinum, clear, and black)

During the 1990s when Apple produced external CRT displays, they built DB-15 video ports into Macintosh computers. Product manuals of the time referred to the port as the “Macintosh video port” and in the later 1990s, the “Monitor port.”

An Apple Service Source document for the Power Macintosh/Server G3 Minitower shows the port in a diagram labeled as the “Monitor Port.”

I have three different versions of this adapter that allows a Macintosh with this DB-15 monitor port to be used with a “standard” VGA monitor. The three versions I have are platinum, clear, and black. The black example is unopened. All three designs have the Apple logo.

Source: Apple

Apple Video Card Accessory (DA-15)

During the 1990s when Apple first entered the external display market, they used the DB-15 video port. Product manuals of the time referred to the port as the “Macintosh video port” or later, the “Monitor port.”

An Apple Service Source document for the Macintosh LC Series/Quadra 605 (Macintosh LC, Macintosh LC II, Macintosh LC III, Macintosh LC 475, Macintosh Quadra 605) specifies the video standard as: “DB-15 monitor port for built-in video; DA-15 connector.”

This Apple Video Card Accessory (part number 513-0091-A) allowed “standard” VGA monitor to be used with a Macintosh computer.

Source: Apple

iPad 10W USB Power Adapter (unopened, 2011)

This iPad 10W USB Power Adapter is compatible with iPad, iPhone, iPod touch, and iPod nano devices with a 30-pin connector. The part number is MC359LL/A.

The box contains three parts, a 30-pin to USB cable, a power “brick,” and a removable 2-prong US power plug. This example is unopened in its original packaging.

iBook Power Adapter (1999)

This iBook Power Adapter is for the original iBook models (1999–2001) with the “clamshell” design. The model number is M7387LL/A.

The iBook Power Adapter is in two parts. The round silver “yo-yo” part has a white Apple logo and allows the thin cord that plugs into the iBook power port to wrap around the inside of the circle for storage. The part of the cord that plugs into the wall is primarily white with transparent ends, allowing the internal wiring to be visible. This transparent design aesthetic is consistent with the translucent plastics used on both the iBook and the color iMac models of the time.

This iBook Power Adapter is stored in its original packaging.

30-pin Digital AV Adapter (unopened, 2012)

This adapter allows an iPad with the original 30-pin connector to be connected to an HDMI display and simultaneously charged. It is compatible with any iPad with a 30-pin connector, iPhone 4 (or later with a 30-pin connector), and iPod touch Generation 4 (or later with a 30-pin connector). Mirroring is supported only by iPad 2 (or later with a 30-pin connector) and iPhone 4s (or later with a 30-pin connector).

From my experience, the ability of an iPad to be mirrored on an HDMI screen is frequently misunderstood. Because an iPad screen is in the 4:3 aspect raitio, when it is mirrored on an HD display (16:9 aspect ratio or other wide format), some users are surprised that the entire external display is not “filled.” I have never been able to understand what the user is expecting—a ridiculously stretched version of the iPad display; a “zoomed” version of the iPad display with the top and bottom cut off; or that somehow the iPad will magically rearrange itself to fill a widescreen display, thus making it a completely new display and, therefore, not mirrored. Instead, the iPad works as expected and appears centered in the middle of a larger display with black bars on both sides (this is called “letterboxing”). If a user launches an app that uses the full screen, such as a presentation designed in HD format or an HD movie, the iPad fills the entire screen.

This 30-pin Digital AV Adapter is unopened in its original, somewhat beat up, packaging.

Mini-DVI to DVI Adapter (DVI-D) (M9321G/B, 2005)

Beginning in 2005, Apple released several computers with a Mini-DVI port, including the 12-inch PowerBook G4, Intel-based iMac, the MacBook Intel-based laptop, the Intel-based Xserve, the 2009 Mac mini, and some late model eMacs.

The port was only used until 2008 when it was replaced with the Mini DisplayPort. The port is used instead of a full-size DVI connector to save physical space while allowing the computer to be connected to a DVI-D display.

Sources: EveryMac, B&H Photo Video, Wikipedia