Apple TV (Generation 2, 2010)

The Apple TV Generation 2 was a major change from the original Apple TV. It was designed to stream rented movies and TV shows from Apple, and to stream movies, shows, photos, and other content from a Mac, PC, iPod, iPhone, or iPad at 720p (30 FPS). It also supported Netflix, YouTube, and Flickr using built-in apps.

The Apple TV Generation 2 used an Apple A4 processor and ran a version of iOS. Ports included HDMI, optical audio, 10/100Base-T Ethernet, and a Micro-USB port (used for service and diagnostics). It connected wirelessly using 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi. Its all-black external case was 3.9 inches square and 0.9 inch tall.

The Apple TV Generation 2 shipped with the aluminum Generation 2 Apple Remote.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPad (original, Wi-Fi, 32 GB, 2010)

The original iPad announcement was outlined in a January 27, 2010, press release issued by Apple. The iPad was described as, “a revolutionary device for browsing the web, reading and sending email, enjoying photos, watching videos, listening to music, playing games, reading e-books and much more.” Steve Jobs said it was, “a magical and revolutionary device…[that] defines an entirely new category of devices that will connect users with their apps and content in a much more intimate, intuitive and fun way than ever before.”

The original iPad used a 9.7-inch multitouch display (1024×768 at 132 ppi). It ran the same operating system as iPhone, which at the time was referred to as iPhone OS 3.2 (the name “iOS” would not be used until June 2010).

Internally, the original iPad had a 1 GHz Apple A4 processor; 16, 32, or 64 GB of storage; 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi; an accelerometer; an ambient light sensor; a digital compass; GPS; two mono speakers; and a built-in microphone. The iPad was 0.5 inches thick and weighed 1.6 pounds.

Sources: EveryMac.com, Apple.com, Wikipedia.com

iPad (original, 3G, 16 GB, 2010) and iPad Keyboard Dock

In a January 27, 2010 press release issued by Apple, the company announced the iPad and described it as, “a revolutionary device for browsing the web, reading and sending email, enjoying photos, watching videos, listening to music, playing games, reading e-books and much more.” It was described by Steve Jobs as, “a magical and revolutionary device at an unbelievable price” that “defines an entirely new category of devices that will connect users with their apps and content in a much more intimate, intuitive and fun way than ever before.”

At the time of its release, the iPad could run the 140,000 apps on the App Store and iTunes content including 11 million songs, 50,000 TV episodes, and over 8,000 films. Apple had also recently announced the iBookstore (now called Apple Books) and a new version of iWork for iPad (including Pages, Keynote, and Numbers).

The original iPad used a 9.7-inch multitouch display (1024×768 at 132 ppi) and ran the same operating system as iPhone, which at the time was referred to as iPhone OS 3.2.

Internally, the original iPad had a 1 GHz Apple A4 processor; 16, 32, or 64 GB of storage; 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi; an accelerometer; an ambient light sensor; a digital compass; GPS; two mono speakers; and a built-in microphone. The iPad was 0.5 inches thick and weighed 1.6 pounds.

This iPad model also had 3G wireless data support. The Wi-Fi version of the iPad was released in March 2010, and this 3G wireless data version was released a month later in April 2010.

The keyboard on the iPad Keyboard Dock measures 11 inches wide, 4.5 inches deep, and stands 0.65 inch tall toward the back, sloping to 0.25 inch at the spacebar. A white plastic dock is fused to the back of the keyboard making the device a total depth of 7.25 inches and 2 inches tall. The dock weighs 1.4 pounds.

Although the keyboard resembles the Mac keyboards of the time, the escape and function buttons found at the top of a Mac keyboard were replaced with 13 keys that control iPad-specific features, including: home screen, search, brightness, picture frame, onscreen keyboard toggle, music track control, volume, and screen lock. Each function is represented by an icon.

Sources: EveryMac.com, Apple.com, Cnet.com

iPhone 4 (2010)

The iPhone 4 represented a major design leap from the previous models with an all stainless steel body, a 3.5-inch Retina display at 960×640 (326 ppi), a chemically hardened “aluminosilcate” over the front display, and the chemically hardened black glass back. A white option was announced, but did not ship for over a year after the announcement.

The iPhone 4 was the first iPhone with dual front and back cameras: a 5 megapixel HD video/still camera (720p at 30 FPS), a 5X digital zoom, and an LED flash on the rear; and a VGA-quality video/still camera on the front designed for video conferencing over Wi-Fi using FaceTime. Both cameras used noise-cancelling microphones.

The iPhone 4 was powered by an A4 processor and added additional mobile network support. It included a digital compass, GPS, an accelerometer, and a new 3-axis gyroscope.

Source: EveryMac.com