Apple Gift Cards (2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2012, 2014)

This collection of Apple gift cards spans the years 2005–2014, and includes gift cards for use in Apple Stores, the iTunes Store, and Starbucks. Apple Store gift cards can be redeemed in brick-and-mortar or online Apple Stores for purchases. iTunes Store gift cards can only be used at the iTunes Store for digital music, video, app, or downloaded purchases.

The special Starbucks card in this collection was sold as a standard Starbucks gift card, but it also allowed two free song downloads in the iTunes Store. When I learned about this offer in 2007, I purchased 25 of these cards at $5 each (the minimum amount allowed for this promotion) and received 50 free song downloads on iTunes (and $125 in Starbucks purchases).

All of these cards have been redeemed.

Thunderbolt to Gigabit Ethernet Adapter (unopened, 2012)

According to Apple, the Apple Thunderbolt to Gigabit Ethernet Adapter “lets you easily connect to a high-performance Gigabit Ethernet network. Small and compact, it connects to the Thunderbolt port on your Mac computer and provides an RJ-45 port that supports 10/100/1000BASE-T networks.”

This adapter can be used with Apple computers with a Thunderbolt port, including MacBook Air (13-inch, Early 2015–2017), MacBook Air (11-inch, Early 2015), MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2012–2015), MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2012–2015), iMac (Retina 4K, 21.5-inch, Late 2015), iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2014–2015), Mac Pro (Late 2013), and Mac mini (Late 2014).

Source: Apple

Lightning to USB Cable (2012)

Apple has sold and included their Lightning to USB Cable in various formats and packaging options. This version of packaging is part number MD818ZM/A. It specifies that the Lightning to USB Cable is “Compatible with all models with a Lightning connector.”

30-pin Digital AV Adapter (unopened, 2012)

This adapter allows an iPad with the original 30-pin connector to be connected to an HDMI display and simultaneously charged. It is compatible with any iPad with a 30-pin connector, iPhone 4 (or later with a 30-pin connector), and iPod touch Generation 4 (or later with a 30-pin connector). Mirroring is supported only by iPad 2 (or later with a 30-pin connector) and iPhone 4s (or later with a 30-pin connector).

From my experience, the ability of an iPad to be mirrored on an HDMI screen is frequently misunderstood. Because an iPad screen is in the 4:3 aspect raitio, when it is mirrored on an HD display (16:9 aspect ratio or other wide format), some users are surprised that the entire external display is not “filled.” I have never been able to understand what the user is expecting—a ridiculously stretched version of the iPad display; a “zoomed” version of the iPad display with the top and bottom cut off; or that somehow the iPad will magically rearrange itself to fill a widescreen display, thus making it a completely new display and, therefore, not mirrored. Instead, the iPad works as expected and appears centered in the middle of a larger display with black bars on both sides (this is called “letterboxing”). If a user launches an app that uses the full screen, such as a presentation designed in HD format or an HD movie, the iPad fills the entire screen.

This 30-pin Digital AV Adapter is unopened in its original, somewhat beat up, packaging.

MagSafe to MagSafe 2 Converter (2012)

According to Apple, the MagSafe to MagSafe 2 Converter allowed you to “use the MagSafe connector on your LED Cinema Display, Thunderbolt Display, or MagSafe Power Adapter to charge your MagSafe 2-equipped Mac computer.”

Essentially, this adapter helped to bridge the gap to allow original MagSafe power-equipped devices (2006–2012) to be used after Apple changed to a new MagSafe 2 (2012–2019) standard in 2012.

MagSafe was an Apple technology that allowed power cords (primarily on laptops, but also used on some displays) to provide power using a magnetically attached cord. The technology was extremely effective in preventing damage because if a user would, for example, trip over a laptop power cord or forget their device was plugged in, the magnet would pull out of the socket without damaging the device.

Devices that used this adapter included: 24-inch Apple LED Cinema Display, 27-inch Apple LED Cinema Display, Apple Thunderbolt Display, Apple 45W MagSafe Power Adapter, Apple 85W MagSafe Power Adapter, MacBook Pro with Retina display, and MacBook Air with MagSafe 2 power port.

Source: Wikipedia, Apple

iPad mini (original, Wi-Fi, 16 GB, silver, unopened, 2012)

The original iPad mini featured a 7.9-inch screen at 1024×768 (163 ppi). Internally, it had a dual core 1 GHz Apple A5 processor; 512 MB of RAM; and 16, 32, or 64 GB of storage. It had two cameras: a rear-mounted 5 megapixel iSight camera (1080p) and a front-mounted 1.2 megapixel FaceTime HD camera (720p). The original iPad mini used a Lightning port.

I kept my original iPad mini in my daily backpack for a very long time due to its near perfect size and weight as a truly mobile device with the same 1024×768 screen as a standard iPad of the time (just with smaller pixels). I purchased this additional iPad mini as an example for my collection and never unboxed it. This version has a silver back and white front. 

Source: EveryMac 

AirPort Express 802.11n (Generation 2, 2012)

The AirPort Express Generation 2 functioned as a wireless access point, to extend the range of a network, as an Ethernet-to-wireless bridge, as a print server, and/or as an audio server. This model allowed up to 50 networked users using the 802.11a/n Wi-Fi standard.

Connectors included an audio connector that combined a 3.5 mm minijack socket and a mini-TOSLINK optical digital connection. On August 28, 2018, AirPlay 2 support was added to the Generation 2 AirPort Express, giving it features similar to HomePod.

Source: Wikipedia

EarPods (with 3.5 mm Headphone Plug, 2012)

The EarPods design replaced a previous Apple headphone design with a circular earphone design. The product description states that, “Unlike traditional, circular earbuds, the design of the EarPods is defined by the geometry of the ear. Which makes them more comfortable for more people than any other earbud-style headphones.”

EarPods also included a remote and microphone on the right EarPod wire. The remote allowed the user to pinch the thickened cord to control volume, play/pause music and video, and answer or end a call.

The same wired EarPod design was used in the EarPods with Lightning Connector product when Apple removed the audio connector from the iPhone. Both the 3.5 mm Headphone Plug and Lightning Connector options were sold at the same time since both ports were still used in Apple products.

This product was sold in a variety of packaging. This is the same packaging that shipped inside iPhone models and also available as OEM replacement parts from some online retailers.

Source: Apple.com

iPad mini Smart Cover (pink, 2012)

The iPad mini Smart cover was available for the original iPad mini. The outer cover was made of polyurethane and the interior had a microfiber lining. Magnets built into the cover allowed it to automatically wake when opened and sleep when closed. The cover could be folded into a stand to allow for viewing in an upright position or typing and drawing in a lower position.

Source: B&H Photo/Video

iPad mini (original, Wi-Fi, 16 GB, space gray, 2012)

The original iPad mini featured a 7.9-inch screen at 1024×768 (163 ppi). Internally, it had a dual core 1 GHz Apple A5 processor; 512 MB of RAM; and 16, 32, or 64 GB of storage. It had two cameras: a rear-mounted 5 megapixel iSight camera (1080p) and a front-mounted 1.2 megapixel FaceTime HD camera (720p). The original iPad mini used a Lightning port.

I found the iPad mini perfect for travel due to its small size, reduced weight, high-quality display, and 10-hour battery.

Source: EveryMac.com