Triangle Keychain (c. 1995)

This triangle-shaped keychain is mostly black with a white printed Apple logo in the center. Each of the three equilateral corners has a different accent color (red, yellow, and green) with a silver keyring attached to each of the three corners.

The green corner is marked “MADE IN CHINA,” and each side is just over 2 inches long. The keychain is approximately 0.25 inch thick.

Apple Heartland Education Clock (c. 1995)

This LED clock features a transparent display with large LED-style numerals that display the time and a blinking separator of four stacked bars. It is constructed with a matte black metal frame with a black plastic base that contains the electronics, battery, and buttons to set the time on the back. The transparent LED screen has a green-gray tint.

The  front of the clock features the Apple logo in white on a black background, and a white panel reads “Heartland Education” printed in the Apple Garamond typeface in black, Apple’s corporate font that was used 1984–2003.

The clock runs on a 357 watch battery. It measures 4.375 inches tall, 3.75 inches wide, with a base measuring 2.375 inches deep, and the body just over 0.25 inch thick.

This clock was previously employee-owned and the date is approximate, based upon its design. The item is undated.

T-shirt, multi-color Apple logotype (black, c. 1995)

This t-shirt is black and features a large multicolor Apple logotype in the Apple Garamond font, the corporate font used from approximately 1984–2003. Each letter of the logotype is a different color: neon green, salmon, bright yellow, bright blue, and hot pink. The colors do not match the multicolor Apple logo in use at the time.

The t-shirt tag indicates it is a Hanes Beefy-T brand made from 100% cotton in size ADULT L. It was made in the U.S.A. The back of the shirt includes no Apple markings.

A variant of this t-shirt design was reintroduced in approximately 2018 and sold in the Visitor Center Apple Store in Apple Park (Cupertino, CA). The “retro” design featured a smaller logotype and used colors that match the classic multicolor Apple logo.

Sources: Wikipedia, 9to5mac

Newton Press box (1995)

Newton Press was a software application for the Newton, Apple’s handheld Personal Digital Assistant. On a two-page MessagePad Accessories sheet, Newton Press is described:

Newton Press
This easy-to-use software allows you to publish electronic documents such as travel itineraries, reference books, or sales charts on your personal computer for viewing and annotating on your MessagePad.

The box states:

“Create documents on your desktop computer, then publish them as Newton books. Drag and drop word processing documents, graphics files, or text created on your personal computer directly to the Newton Press application for simple, one-step creation of Newton electronic reference books. Or use the formatting capabilities to format your books, create tables of contents, establish paragraph links, and more. Anyone with a Newton personal digital assistant (PDA) can view, annotate, fax, or print the books you create.”

This copy of Newton Press is unopened and in its original shrink wrap.

Source: Apple

Apple Service Source CDs (1995-1998)

This collection of Apple Service Source CD-ROMs is from 1995–1998. These CDs were provided by Apple to allow authorized repairs of Apple equipment.

The CDs contain the following types of files and information:

Service Source Startup—A HyperCard document explaining the contents of the CD-ROM and a folder containing Service Source Files.

System Stuff (folder)—Applications and system files such as Apple QuickTime extension file, the Apple CD-ROM driver, 32-bit Color Quickdraw, and TeachText.

Disk Images (folder)—Applications such as HyperCard.

Clips (folder)—QuickTime movies and animations that demonstrate difficult repairs and the locations of hard-to-find components.

Viewer (folder)—Inside Mac Viewer, a utility to display archived and international-only service information.

Apple TechStep (folder)—release notes for late-breaking and critical information about TechStep tests.

AppleOrder (folder)—AppleOrder application.

Q-Stack TAC (folder)—HyperCard stack to send technical questions to the Apple Technical Assistance Center.

What’s New.Archive (TeachText document)—text file that archives the “What’s New” section of previous releases of Service Source, organized by release date and product.

Source: Macintosh Repository (1995, 1997, 1998)

Apple CD media (1995)

My collection of Apple CD and DVD media includes operating systems, applications, software collections that shipped with devices, promotional media, diagnostic tools, and educational content. In general, Apple-branded CD or DVD examples in original packaging have been presented separately, while single discs or collections of discs are presented chronologically.

Apple CDs from 1995 include:

  • Apple Macintosh CD, Macintosh LC 580, Macintosh LC 630 (SSW Version 7.5, CD Version 1.1, 691-0793-A, 1995)
  • Apple Macintosh CD, Power Macintosh 5200/75 (SSW Version 7.5, CD Version 1.0, 691-0405-A, 1995)
  • Apple Macintosh CD, Macintosh LC 630 DOS Compatible (SSW Version 7.5, CD Version 1.0, 691-0492-A, 1995)
  • Earth Explorer: The multimedia encyclopedia of the environment—and more! (691-0412-A, 1995)

In 1995 Macintosh computer system software was able to fit on a single CD. Apple used a standard white CD envelope with a white cloth-like back and a clear plastic front for system CDs.

StyleWriter Black Ink Cartridge (unopened, 1995)

This unopened black ink cartridge features the classic multicolor Apple logo and is labeled “Apple Printer Supplies” with the reorder number M8041G/C. Online printer supply resellers identify this product as being identical to the Canon BC-02 cartridge, revealing that some Apple inkjet printers were rebranded Canon printers.

This ink cartridge could be used with several Apple printers including, Apple StyleWriter 1200, Apple StyleWriter 1500, Apple StyleWriter 1500 Color, Apple StyleWriter I, and Apple StyleWriter II.

PowerBook 5300cs (1995)

The Macintosh PowerBook 5300c/100 used a 100 MHz processor (PowerPC 603e), shipped with 8 MB or 16 MB of RAM, and included a 500 MB or 750 MB hard drive. The “cs” in the name indicated that its 10.4-inch color display displayed 8-bit color on its 640×480 display.

This was among the first Apple laptop series to use “hot swappable” drive bays (along with the PowerBook 190 from the same year), meaning that users could remove and replace the internal drives without restarting the computer.

This laptop shipped with Macintosh System 7.5.2 and could run operating systems up to Mac OS 9.1. The PowerBook 5300cs weighed 6.2 pounds.

Because this laptop was designed to be as small as possible at the time, it had insufficient internal space for an internal CD-ROM drive. Its design also replaced the rotating back feet of previous PowerBook models with spring-loaded feet that pop out to elevate the angle of the laptop. The case also used a darker shade of grey (almost black) than its predecessors.

PowerBook 5300 computers were infamous at the time for shipping with a few quality problems. Notably, the internal battery on two early models reportedly overheated and burst into flames, a design flaw that Apple corrected by switching from lithium ion to nickel metal hydride batteries. Apple reported that only a few hundred laptops shipped with the early battery and a free replacement was offered. Some users also experienced problems with the display hinges cracking over time and the internal connector ribbons wearing out, leading to screen failure (the screen would show vertical lines or go completely black).

The PowerBook 3400 replaced the 5300 and some of the 5300-series hot-swappable drive bay modules could be used with newer 3400 PowerBooks.

Source: EveryMac, Wikipedia

PowerBook 5300c/100 (1995)

The Macintosh PowerBook 5300c/100 shipped with a 100 MHz processor (PowerPC 603e), 8 MB or 16 MB of RAM, and included a 500 MB or 750 MB hard drive. The “c” in the name indicated its 10.4-inch color active-matrix display (640×480) that allowed 16-bit color on its display or an external monitor.

This was among the first Apple laptop series to use “hot swappable” drive bays (along with the PowerBook 190 that shipped the same year with a similar design), meaning that users could remove and replace the internal drives without restarting the computer.

This laptop shipped with Macintosh System 7.5.2 and could run operating systems up to Mac OS 9.1. The PowerBook 5300c weighed 6.2 pounds.

Because this laptop was designed to be as small as possible at the time, it had insufficient internal space for an internal CD-ROM drive. Its design also replaced the rotating back feet of previous PowerBook models with spring-loaded feet that pop out to elevate the angle of the laptop. The case also used a darker shade of grey than its predecessors (almost black).

PowerBook 5300 computers were infamous at the time for shipping with a few quality problems. Notably, the internal battery on two early models reportedly overheated and burst into flames, a design flaw that Apple corrected by switching from lithium ion to nickel metal hydride batteries. Apple reported that only a few hundred laptops shipped with the early battery and a free replacement was offered. Some users also experienced problems with the display hinges cracking over time and the internal connector ribbons wearing out leading to screen failure (the screen would show vertical lines or go completely black).

The PowerBook 3400 replaced the 5300 and some of the 5300-series hot-swappable drive bay modules could be used with newer 3400 PowerBooks.

Source: EveryMac, Wikipedia