iPod nano Generation 6 (graphite, 2010)

The iPod nano Generation 6 was a major design change from previous iPod nano models. This iPod nano came in silver, graphite, blue, green, orange, pink, and (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition. Its design was a square aluminum and glass case with a clip on the back. It used a 1.54-inch Multitouch screen at 240×240 pixels.

Although its interface looks similar to iOS, the iPod nano Generation 6 cannot run iOS applications or games compatible with previous iPod models. Its features include a pedometer, FM radio with live pause, Nike+iPod functions, VoiceOver, and Shake to Shuffle.

This example is graphite—a shade of gray that was darker than silver.

Notably, some third-party manufacturers, such as Belkin, offered a watch band accessory for this iPod nano that took advantage of its built-in watch face app and the device’s clip. Using this accessory, the iPod nano Generation 6 could be worn on the wrist like a watch.

Source: EveryMac.com

Apple iPod from HP (iPod Generation 4, 20GB, 2004)

On January 9, 2004, HP’s then-CEO, Carly Fiorina, announced an “iPod+HP” partnership between Apple and HP. The first iPod+HP device was this Generation 4 iPod, available with 20GB and 40GB of storage. Three more iPod+HP models were added during the partnership, including iPod mini, iPod photo, and iPod shuffle.

During her speech at the Consumer Electronics Show, Fiorina announced the partnership and held up an example Generation 4 iPod+HP device, reporting that the Apple iPod from HP would be sold in a custom “HP blue” color, a powdery shade of blue resembling the color of faded denim. Based upon the demo unit she held, the iPod front and scroll wheel were blue, while the back remained polished chrome. When the iPod+HP device was released, it was not offered in blue, but remained white. However, the back of the device was engraved with the Apple logo, the word “iPod,” and the “HP invent” logo.

According to the Stories of Apple website, “this was the first (and only) iPod license ever allowed: Apple would manufacture a version of the iPod for HP and the iTunes software would be pre-installed on all HP Pavilion and Compaq Presario computers.” The partnership was not successful and was terminated after 18 months.

Regarding the iPod+HP design and functionality, the device was very similar to the Apple iPod Generation 4 sold by Apple at the time. According to EveryMac: “There is extremely little difference between Windows-compatible Apple iPods and the corresponding models that were offered from Hewlett-Packard. Each are identicial except HP added an HP logo below the Apple logo on the back of each player and shipped their models in a box that matched the design of other HP products.”

This model originally contained a 20GB or 40GB 4200RPM ATA-66 hard drive that could hold 5,000 or 10,000 songs. It uses a ClickWheel for navigation and has a 2-inch grayscale screen at 160×128 resolution. Its battery supported up to 12 hours of continuous music playback with features including Shuffle, voice record, games, and an alarm clock.

Perhaps to make up for the inexplicably non-blue iPod color offering, HP used its extensive printer and printing accessory experience to sell “HP printable tattoos” for the iPod. An HP press release reported, “Digital music enthusiasts can now personalize the look of their Apple iPod from HP as easily as they customize their playlists with the launch of HP Printable Tattoos.” The stickers were butterfly-shaped and included both pre-printed designs and blank sheets so “digital music enthusiasts” could design their own iPod skins.

This iPod+HP model originally contained a 20GB hard drive; however, this device has been retrofitted with a new battery and flash memory storage.

Sources: EveryMac (FAQ, specifications), Wikipedia, iLounge, HP, Stories of Apple

iPod mini (Generation 2, 4GB, blue, 2005)

When the original iPod mini was released in 2004, Apple described it as “the smallest portable music player ever to hold up to 1,000 CD-quality songs.” Originally, it was available in silver, gold, pink, blue, or green, but the second generation iPod mini from 2005 offered brighter versions of the pink, blue, and green and dropped the gold option. In addition, the Generation 2 models matched the printing on the ClickWheel to the color of the exterior case.

The iPod mini Generation 2 also increased battery life from 8 hours to an impressive 18 hours and was offered in 4GB and 8GB configurations. Both iPod mini models used the same size case: 3.6 x 2.0 x 0.5 inches. The iPod mini Generation 2 weighed 3.6 ounces and used a 1.67-inch grayscale display. The iPod mini Generation 2 charged with an included USB 2.0 cable with a 30-pin connector.

This iPod mini is blue and has 4GB of storage. Please note that this particular device has been retrofitted with a flash memory storage upgrade and a new battery.

Sources: Apple (Newsroom), EveryMac

iPod nano Generation 5 (black, 2009)

The iPod nano Generation 5 was notable because of its impressive color choices. This model was available in nine colors: (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition, pink, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, silver, and black. The finish for the generation 5 nano is glossy and the case is made of aluminum and glass. It was available with 8 GB or 16 GB of flash memory (2,000 or 4,000 songs).

This iPod nano also features a video camera with an integrated microphone and speaker that takes advantage of its high-quality 2.2″ TFT display (240×376, 204 ppi). The video quality is H.264 VGA 640×480 at 30 FPS with AAC audio, but it cannot take still photographs. This iPod also has a built-in FM Radio with “live pause,” allowing pause and rewind up to 15 minutes.

This example is black, although this shade of “black” is reminiscent of the “space gray” colors Apple would later introduce.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod “Take One” Apple Store brochure collection (2004)

iPod “Take One” store brochures (2004)—Each of these set of three 1-page brochures measures 4.375 x 6.5 inches and features an iPod (“Actual Size”) on the front with a bright pink, bright green, or bright blue background. The back features a photo of the back of the iPod photo with a description of features in an ink color that matches the front. The iPod image is perforated and can be punched out.

iPod mini “Take One” store brochure (2004)—This 1-page brochure measures 4.375 x 6.5 inches and features a pink iPod mini on a white background on the front with various features highlighted. The back has a quirky suggestion about naming playlists and a photo of the back of the iPod mini. The iPod mini image is perforated and can be punched out.

iPod “Take One” Apple Store brochure collection (2005)

iPod photo “Take One” store brochures (2005)—Each of these set of three 1-page brochures measures 4.375 x 6.5 inches and features an iPod photo (30GB and 60GB) on the front along with a closeup of the color screen. There are three versions of this design: a green-to-blue gradient background, a yellow-to-green gradient background, and a pink-to-yellow gradient background. The back features a photo of the full iPod photo with a Photo Library on the screen and descriptions of the iPod’s features.

iPod nano “Take One” store brochure (2005)—This 1-page brochure measures 4.375 x 6.5 inches. The front shows a hand holding an iPod nano between the thumb and forefinger with the headline “1,000 songs. Impossibly small. iPod nano.” on a black background. The back has a white background, pictures both a white and black iPod nano, and describes the device’s features.

iPod shuffle “Take One” store brochure (January 2005)—This 1-page brochure measures 4.375 x 6.5 inches and features an iPod shuffle on a bright green background on the front with a stylized “shuffle” graphic in light green in the background. The back describes the iPod shuffle, shows the back of the device (“Actual Size”), and pictures line drawings of four available Apple accessories: Sport Case, Dock, Armband, and Battery Pack.

Lightning to USB Cable (1 m, 2015)

Apple has sold and included their Lightning to USB Cable in various formats and packaging options over the years. This version of the product and packaging is part number ZM826-0420-B. Apple specifies that the Lightning to USB Cable is “Compatible with all models with a Lightning connector.”

iPod touch (Generation 2, 8 GB, black, 2009)

This version of the iPod touch was originally marketed as the “new iPod touch” and designated as “iPod touch (Late 2009)” by Apple. Due to its similarities, this model is sometimes confused with the Generation 3 iPod touch, but the Generation 2 model is differentiated by the fact it cannot run an iOS version beyond iOS 4.2.1.

This iPod touch was released around the same time as the iPhone 3GS and shares many features (except the iPod touch did not have 3G/EDGE phone, A-GPS, digital compass, and integrated camera).

The iPod touch Generation 2 8 GB included a multi-touch 3.5-inch display (320×480), accelerometer, ambient light sensor, and 802.11b/g/n. It used a 30-pin connector, included a stereo headphone jack, and shipped with Apple’s standard earphones of the time.

Source: Everymac, Wikipedia

iPod touch (Generation 3, 32 GB, black, 2009)

The iPod touch Generation 3 was very similar to the iPod touch Generation 2 and was released around the same time as the iPhone 3GS. This iPod touch had features similar to the iPhone 3GS, except the iPod touch did not include 3G/EDGE (phone), A-GPS, digital compass, or an integrated camera.

The 32 and 64 GB Generation 3 iPod touch models are the same externally as the Generation 2, but had 50% faster performance, OpenGL graphics, and ran up to iOS version iOS 5.1.1.

The iPod touch Generation 3 included a multi-touch 3.5-inch display (320×480), accelerometer, ambient light sensor, and 802.11b/g/n. It used a 30-pin connector, included a stereo headphone jack, VoiceOver voice control, and shipped with the same Earphones with Remote and Mic as the iPhone 3GS.

Source: Everymac, Wikipedia

iPod touch (Generation 4, 8 GB, black, 2010)

Although the iPod touch Generation 4 has a design similar to the iPhone 3GS, its features more closely resemble those of the iPhone 4 that sold at the same time. (The iPod touch lacked the iPhone 4 features of 3G/EDGE phone, A-GPS, and digital compass.)

The iPod touch Generation 4 included a 3.5-inch Retina Display (960×640 at 326 ppi), FaceTime video calling (using Apple ID), an integrated microphone and front-facing VGA camera, 3-axis gyroscope, and a 720p camera (lower quality than the iPhone 4). However, the iPod touch Generation 4 allowed iMovie editing using the iOS version of iMovie available at the time.

The iPod touch Generation 4 used an A4 processor, 256 MB of RAM, and was available with 32 or 64 GB of RAM for storage.

Source: Everymac, Wikipedia