USB Mouse balls (OEM replacement, 1998)

The original Apple USB Mouse, model M4848, used a half-teal blue and half-white ball that matched the Bondi blue iMac. When new iMac colors were introduced (blueberry, strawberry, lime, tangerine, and grape) the teal and white ball continued to be used until it was replaced with a gray and white ball.

These teal and white USB Mouse balls are official replacement parts provided by Apple.

Composite Video Cable (2000)

The Composite Video Cable shipped with various iBook models and allowed the iBook to be connected to an external TV and/or stereo.

The cable shipped with the following iBook laptops: iBook (FireWire), iBook (Dual USB), iBook (Late 2001), iBook (14.1-inch).

Source: emc2cs.com

Apple IR Remotes (c. 1995)

Apple included a few different versions of IR remotes in the various AV kits and expansion cards sold throughout the 1990s. The remotes shown here represented two designs with the same functions. The remotes were not marked as “official” Apple parts, lacking both model numbers and serial numbers.

The buttons include Mute, Power, Volume up, Volume down, Channel up, Channel down, Display, Stop/Eject, TV/Mac, Reverse, Play/Pause, and Forward.

Apple Ethernet Twisted Pair Transceiver (c. 1995)

The Apple Ethernet Twisted Pair Transceiver used the Apple Attachment Unit Interface (AAUI) to connect Ethernet transceivers to computers. This transceiver used a 10BASE-T connector. This version of the transceiver used an RJ45 port.

Apple computers with an AAUI port included Macintosh Quadra, Centris, PowerBook 500, Duo Dock II (for PowerBook Duo), early Power Macintosh computers, and some Macintosh LC and Performa computers.

When I first began as a Technology Coordinator for a school district, our Macintosh LC520 network was connected entirely using Apple Ethernet Twisted Pair Transceiver devices and BNC connectors in a daisy-chain setup. When we updated the computer lab, we stopped using the AAUI port and installed 10BASE-T cards in the computers.

Source: Wikipedia.org

Apple PlainTalk Microphone (transparent, unopened, 1999)

This was Apple’s second PlainTalk Microphone product. This version was introduced with the AV models of the Macintosh Quadra series in 1993 and sold separately. This microphone was designed to be placed on the top of a CRT screen. The long connector was used to power the microphone.

This version of the Apple Plaintalk Microphone was cast in transparent plastic to match the G3 Blue & White tower. This microphone was included with a G3 Blue & White tower and was never opened.

The following Macs supported the PlainTalk Microphone according to Apple: Quadra 605,630,660,840; Centris 660; LC 475, 605, 520, 550, 575, 580, 630; Performa 475, 476, 520, 550, 560, 575, 577, 578, 580, 588, 630, 631, 635, 636, 637, 638, 640, 5200, 5210, 5115, 5220, 5260, 5270, 5280, 5300, 5320, 5400, 5410, 5420, 5430, 5440, 6110, 6112, 6115, 6116, 6117, 6118, 6200, 6205, 6210, 6214, 6216, 6218, 6220, 6230, 6260, 6290, 6300, 6310, 6320, 6360, 6400, 6410, 6420; Network Server 500, 700; Workgroup Server 6150, 7250, 7350, 8150, 8550, 9650; G3 Server 233, 266; G4 Server 500MHz; PowerMac 4400, 5200, 5260, 5300, 5400, 5500, 6100, 6200, 6300, 6400, 6500, 7100, 7200, 7215, 7220, 7300, 7500, 7600, 8100, 8115, 8200, 8500, 8515, 8600, 9500, 9515, 9600; PowerMac G3 Beige Desktop & Mini Tower, G3 Blue & White; Twentieth Anniversary Mac; iMac G3; and PowerMac G4 PCI, AGP, GE.

Sources: applemacparts.co.uk, Wikipedia.org

Apple SCSI System Cable (1992)

SCSI (Small Computer System Interface) was used to physically connect two computers to peripheral devices and transfer data between them. SCSI was used to connect hard disk drives, tape drives, scanners, CD drives, and other devices. SCSI is pronounced “scuzzy.”

I remember using an Apple SCSI System Cable to connect external Apple CD-ROM drives, scanners, and hard drives. The thickness of the cable made it difficult to bend and contributed to a high failure rate.

Source: Wikipedia.com

Apple SCSI Active Terminator (1992)

The SCSI (Small Computer System Interface) was used to physically connect two computers to peripheral devices and transfer data between them. SCSI was used to connect hard disk drives, tape drives, scanners, CD drives, and other devices. SCSI is pronounced “scuzzy.”

The Apple SCSI Active Terminator was used to allow “active termination” in a chain of SCSI devices. Active Termination is defined as an advanced form of terminating SCSI cables that controls “the impedance at the end of the SCSI bus by using a voltage regulator, not just the power supplied by the interface card” (myoldmac.com).

Although different SCSI interfaces were available, this terminator uses the original parallel SCSI interface.

Sources: myoldmac.net, Wikipedia.com

Macintosh PowerBook Video Cable (1992)

The Macintosh PowerBook Video Cable allowed PowerBook 100-series laptops to be connected to Apple monitors sold in the early 1990s. Both ends of the cable were Apple-proprietary.

This cable allowed users of the earliest PowerBook series, such as the PowerBook 160 with a grayscale-only display, to plug into a color Apple monitor and use the PowerBook with a color screen.

According to an Apple Support document, the cable supported a resolution of 832×624 and was compatible with the following laptops: PowerBook 1400-series, PowerBook 190-series, PowerBook 520-series, PowerBook 5300-series, PowerBook 540-series, PowerBook 550c [Japan Only], PowerBook 160/165/180, and PowerBook 165c/180c.

Source: Apple

Microphone (1990)

The Apple Microphone shipped with Macintosh LC computers and could be purchased separately. The package included a microphone and a holder with a self-adhesive back. The Microphone was an omnidirectional condenser microphone with a frequency range of 100 Hz to 10 KHz. The cable terminated in a 3.5 mm stereo plug.

The Microphone is known as a PlainTalk Microphone. The following Macs support the PlainTalk Microphone according to Apple: Quadra 605,630,660,840; Centris 660; LC 475, 605, 520, 550, 575, 580, 630; Performa 475, 476, 520, 550, 560, 575, 577, 578, 580, 588, 630, 631, 635, 636, 637, 638, 640, 5200, 5210, 5115, 5220, 5260, 5270, 5280, 5300, 5320, 5400, 5410, 5420, 5430, 5440, 6110, 6112, 6115, 6116, 6117, 6118, 6200, 6205, 6210, 6214, 6216, 6218, 6220, 6230, 6260, 6290, 6300, 6310, 6320, 6360, 6400, 6410, 6420; Network Server 500, 700; Workgroup Server 6150, 7250, 7350, 8150, 8550, 9650; G3 Server 233, 266; G4 Server 500MHz; PowerMac 4400, 5200, 5260, 5300, 5400, 5500, 6100, 6200, 6300, 6400, 6500, 7100, 7200, 7215, 7220, 7300, 7500, 7600, 8100, 8115, 8200, 8500, 8515, 8600, 9500, 9515, 9600; PowerMac G3 Beige Desktop & Mini Tower, G3 Blue & White; Twentieth Anniversary Mac; iMac G3; and PowerMac G4 PCI, AGP, GE.

I have two different versions of the packaging for these microphones. The white box is from 1990 and the brown cardboard box version is from 1991.

Sources: applemacparts.co.uk, Wikipedia.org

iPad mini Smart Cover (pink, 2012)

The iPad mini Smart cover was available for the original iPad mini. The outer cover was made of polyurethane and the interior had a microfiber lining. Magnets built into the cover allowed it to automatically wake when opened and sleep when closed. The cover could be folded into a stand to allow for viewing in an upright position or typing and drawing in a lower position.

Source: B&H Photo/Video