Xsan 2 box (2008)

This Xsan 2 retail box from 2008 includes the software to set up Apple’s SAN (Storage Area Network) solution on a Mac with a G5 processor with an Apple Fibre Channel card running Mac OS X or Mac OS X Server 10.5 or later.

The box uses the tagline, “Share terabytes of storage. Zero bottlenecks.”

The four key technologies highlighted on the box include:

  • Simplified setup
  • MultiSAN
  • Full-throttle performance
  • Spotlight

The Xsan 2 setup guide is not for the faint of heart. It lists “Equipment You’ll Need” and specifies, “To set up a SAN using the instructions in this guide, you need:”

  • RAID storage devices for SAN storage
  • Two computers running Mac OS X Server v10.5 to act as SAN metadata controllers
  • One or more SAN client computers running Mac OS X v10.5 or Mac OS X Server v10.5
  • An Intel or PowerPC G5 processor and at least 2 GB of RAM in each SAN computer
  • An additional 2 GB per SAN volume in each metadata controller that hosts more
  • than one SAN volume
  • An Apple Fibre Channel PCI, PCI-X, or PCI-E card installed in each SAN computer
  • A Fibre Channel switch and cables for all storage devices and computers
  • An Ethernet switch and cables for the private SAN metadata network
  • A second Ethernet switch and cables for public intranet and Internet access
  • An equipment rack for your RAID storage systems and Xserve computers
  • A list of qualified RAID systems and Fibre Channel switches is available on the Xsan website at www.apple.com/xsan

Source: Apple

Xserve Power Cord (2003)

This short (11-inch) power cord shipped with a later version of the Xserve or the Xserve RAID, a rack-mount server from Apple produced from 2002–2009. This short power cord was ideal for a rack-mounted server to conserve both rack space and weight.

The Apple Xserve had the ability to house two power supplies so there was redundancy in the event one power supply failed. According to one of the Xserve User Guides:

Power supply and power supply bays—A removable power supply for the Xserve. The power cord connects here. You can install two 750- watt power supplies for redundancy; either supply can take over the full load for the Xserve if the other supply fails or is removed.

The original Xserve User’s Guide specifies that it only ships with a long power cord: “You can use the long power cord supplied with the server, or another cord…” Thus, this power cord likely shipped with a later Xserve model. The Xserve RAID User Guide acknowledges that the Xserve RAID may have shipped with more than one type of power cord (“If you received more than two power cords, use the ones with plugs compatible with the electrical supply for your location.”)

Source: Apple (Xserve, Xserve RAID)