Apple TV/Video System (1994)

The Apple TV/Video System was a kit consisting of two hardware components, software, a handheld remote, and user manuals. The system allowed any Apple Power Macintosh, Macintosh Quadra, Macintosh LC, or Macintosh Performa to “Watch TV, capture video images, and create multimedia—all on your Macintosh.”

The specific components in the box included: Apple TV Tuner, Apple Video Player Card, Apple Video Player software, Remote control, and a User’s guide. The box also indicated that “your remote control might look different from the one shown here.” Indeed, the remote pictured on the box is not the one that shipped with any of the systems I have ever seen.

The box also lists the system’s features (in a bulleted list): “Lets you watch TV in a window that appears on the desktop of your Macintosh. Includes a remote control that lets you switch channels, adjust the volume, and control your CD player. Allows you to connect your camcorder or VCR to your Macintosh, and watch the video footage in a window on the display. Lets you capture a single image or a series of images that you can add to reports, letters, and presentations. Features an easy-to-use control panel that gives you one-button image and movie capture. Lets you resize the TV/video window up to the full size of your screen; you can place it anywhere on your desktop.”

Since this system was released before iMovie was created, it also included the Avid VideoShop 3.0 software on CD. At the time, this system was the easiest method for watching TV/video on a Macintosh, and it introduced a low-cost way to edit videos.

I remember that these systems were offered at no additional cost to education with certain Macintosh and Power Macintosh purchases.

Source: Apple

Apple TV (Generation 2, 2010)

The Apple TV Generation 2 was a major change from the original Apple TV. It was designed to stream rented movies and TV shows from Apple, and to stream movies, shows, photos, and other content from a Mac, PC, iPod, iPhone, or iPad at 720p (30 FPS). It also supported Netflix, YouTube, and Flickr using built-in apps.

The Apple TV Generation 2 used an Apple A4 processor and ran a version of iOS. Ports included HDMI, optical audio, 10/100Base-T Ethernet, and a Micro-USB port (used for service and diagnostics). It connected wirelessly using 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi. Its all-black external case was 3.9 inches square and 0.9 inch tall.

The Apple TV Generation 2 shipped with the aluminum Generation 2 Apple Remote.

Source: EveryMac.com

Composite Video Cable (2000)

The Composite Video Cable shipped with various iBook models and allowed the iBook to be connected to an external TV and/or stereo.

The cable shipped with the following iBook laptops: iBook (FireWire), iBook (Dual USB), iBook (Late 2001), iBook (14.1-inch).

Source: emc2cs.com

Composite AV Cable (unopened, 2010)

The Composite AV Cable allowed the connection of iPod, iPhone, or iPad to a television or stereo system. It allowed movies and videos to be viewed along with stereo sound from a device with a 30-pin connector. This cable did not allow the display to be  mirrored.

According to Apple.com, “The Composite AV Cable connects to your device or Universal Dock via the 30-pin dock connector and to your TV, home cinema receiver or stereo receiver via the composite video and red/white analogue audio ports. The cable also features a USB connector that you can plug in to a power source.”

This cable is unopened in a white box. It was later repackaged in a black box.

Reference: Apple.com, Wikipedia.org

AppleDesign Powered Speakers II (1993)

The data sheet that Apple provided for the AppleDesign Powered Speakers II described them as “audiophile-quality…designed to work perfectly with virtually any personal computer, portable CD player or audio cassette player and with any television that supports sound output.” 

The design of the rear speaker leg allowed the speakers to be adjusted to various angles. The power and volume controls was located in the front of the right speaker and an included cable with 3.5 mm plugs that connected the two speakers. Volume and an external headphone port were also located on the front of the right speaker. A stereo audio input port was located on the rear of the right speaker.

The speakers delivered 90 dB at 0.5m at 200Hz. Each speaker measures 6.8 inches tall, 4.1 inches wide, and 3.9 inches deep. The speakers were available as a set and as a part of the Apple Multimedia Kit for Macintosh.

This AppleDesign Powered Speakers II model is beige and matches Apple desktop computers sold at the time. Another version, considered far more rare, was also available in black with silver metallic Apple logos.

Reference: Apple via picclick.com

Macintosh TV (1993)

I acquired my Macintosh TV in the early 2000s in an eBay purchase. This 1993 Macintosh is said to be among the most rare with sources reporting between 8,000 and 10,000 manufactured. The machine is based upon the Macintosh LC 520, but it came standard with a TV and FM tuner card with a remote control. The computer was Apple’s first computer to ship standard with a cable-ready (BNC port) television built in.

One of the rare elements about this computer is that it was all black, including the ADB mouse and keyboard, both the standard issue at the time of manufacture. At the time, all other Macintosh computers were beige.

The CD player uses a tray cartridge design. To insert a CD, you remove the tray, open the clear plastic tray lid, insert the CD, and then insert the tray cartridge into the CD slot. The CD slot is labeled “CD Caddy.”

When I did the photo shoot for my Macintosh TV, I noticed that rust had formed around the serial and printer ports in the back of the computer. I removed the back and slid out the motherboard to found that the internal battery had ruptured and corroded many of the surrounding parts. I cleaned the inside of the board and removed the battery. I also didn’t attempt to start the computer since several components on the board were affected.

Source: EveryMac.com.