iPhone Stereo Headset (bulk packaging, 2007)

The iPhone Stereo Headset were the headphones that shipped with the first two iPhone models, the original iPhone (2007–2008) and the iPhone 3G (2008–2010). The headphones used a similar enclosed design as the later EarPods, and the right earbud included a control button with a microphone on the wire. The button is controlled by a squeeze and it can be set for a variety of tasks: answer/end calls, advance presentation slides, play/pause music/video, or capture photos. A double-press also allowed the user to skip to the next music track.

Note that the controller did not include the + and – option for volume and/or other controls, a feature now taken for granted in many headphone designs.

iLounge described these headphones as, “familiar and inexpensive, with very good earbud and microphone quality.” They also praised the bass response, warm sound, and the quality of the microphone.

This example is in Apple’s bulk packaging. I remember receiving the headphones when I attended an Apple Education professional development opportunity that required attendees to have a microphone. These were never unpackaged because I had brought and used my personal headphones.

Sources: Wikipedia, iLounge

Composite Video Cable (2000)

The Composite Video Cable shipped with various iBook models and allowed the iBook to be connected to an external TV and/or stereo.

The cable shipped with the following iBook laptops: iBook (FireWire), iBook (Dual USB), iBook (Late 2001), iBook (14.1-inch).

Source: emc2cs.com

Composite AV Cable (unopened, 2010)

The Composite AV Cable allowed the connection of iPod, iPhone, or iPad to a television or stereo system. It allowed movies and videos to be viewed along with stereo sound from a device with a 30-pin connector. This cable did not allow the display to be  mirrored.

According to Apple.com, “The Composite AV Cable connects to your device or Universal Dock via the 30-pin dock connector and to your TV, home cinema receiver or stereo receiver via the composite video and red/white analogue audio ports. The cable also features a USB connector that you can plug in to a power source.”

This cable is unopened in a white box. It was later repackaged in a black box.

Reference: Apple.com, Wikipedia.org

iPod Dock (2003)

When the iPod switched its connector from a FireWire port to the proprietary 30-pin Dock Connector, several new compatibility and hardware features became available. Because the Dock Connector handled data, sound, and charging capabilities, a variety of connection options were available. 

The iPod Dock allowed a connected iPod to simultaneously charge, send sound to an external stereo system through a line-out port in the back, and respond to commands from an Apple Remote control device.

Source: Apple-History.com

iMac G5 2.0 20-inch (2005)

The iMac G5 featured a 2.0 GHz PowerPC 970 (G5) processor, 512 MB of 400 MHz PC3200 DDR SDRAM, a 250 GB (7200 RPM) Serial ATA hard drive, a vertically-mounted slot-loading 8X DVD-R/CD-RW SuperDrive, and built-in stereo speakers at the bottom of the display. The screen was a 20-inch TFT Active Matrix LCD at 1680×1050. Wired ports included FireWire 400 and USB 2.0. Wireless connections included AirPort Extreme (802.11g) and Bluetooth 2.0+EDR.

Like its predecessors, the iMac G5 rested on an aluminum stand with an adjustable hinge. It also supported the VESA (Video Electronics Standards Association) mounting interface standard which allowed the iMac to be mounted directly on a kiosk, wall, or arm. The iMac G5 also had an Ambient Light Sensor under the edge of the display that dims the sleep indicator light when the room is dark.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod Hi-Fi (2006)

The iPod Hi-Fi was announced by Steve Jobs on February 28, 2006, in a keynote where he introduced the device as “Home stereo. Reinvented.” The speaker system included a 30-pin iPod connector on top and shipped with inserts for every iPod with a dock connector it has shipped until that time. The back of the iPod Hi-Fi included a 3.5mm stereo input so users with an iPod shuffle (or other device) could connect to the device.

The remote control that shipped with the iPod Hi-Fi, the same remote that shipped with iMac models at the time, could only control volume and skip between tracks within the selected playlist. The menu button switched between the dock and the audio-in port and could not control the functions of the iPod in the dock. Also, the iPod Hi-Fi can be used with all iPods with a dock connector, but will only charge iPods that support Firewire charging.

My example iPod Hi-Fi unfortunately has crushed speaker cones on the two smaller speakers. I’ve attempted a few remedies unsuccessfully.

The iPod Hi-Fi retailed at the Apple Store for $349. This price was higher than similar high-end iPod speaker systems at the time, including a then-popular system from Bose priced at $299. The iPod Hi-Fi was discontinued on September 5, 2007.

Source: Wikipedia