HomePod mini (white, 2020)

The HomePod mini was the second device in Apple’s HomePod line of intelligent, Siri-controlled speakers. Despite its small size and relatively low price, the HomePod mini offered impressive sound quality. Apple described the HomePod mini: “Jam-packed with innovation, HomePod mini delivers unexpectedly big sound for a speaker of its size. At just 3.3 inches tall, it takes up almost no space but fills the entire room with rich 360‑degree audio that sounds amazing from every angle.”

Apple designed the HomePod mini to allow homes to use multiple devices:

“With multiple HomePod mini speakers placed around the house, you can have a connected sound system for your whole home. Ask Siri to play one song everywhere or, just as easily, a different song in each room. And HomePod mini works with HomePod for multiroom audio and features like Intercom. If you want to take the amazing sound experience of HomePod mini even further, you can create a stereo pair. Two HomePod mini speakers paired in the same room create left and right channels for an immersive soundstage.”

The HomePod mini was spherical with a flat top and bottom. It measured 3.3 inches high and 3.9 inches wide. Internally, it used four microphones and allowed real-time tuning through computational audio. The HomePod mini had no ports and connected wirelessly to audio sources including Apple Music, iTunes music purchases, iCloud Music Library with an Apple Music or iTunes Match subscription, and some third-party services. In addition, it could play content from any device that allowed AirPlay streaming (AirPlay 2). Wireless technology included 802.11n Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 5.0.

The top of the device provided a backlit touch surface for certain controls: Tap to Play/Pause music or Siri; Double-tap to Skip; Triple-tap to Skip back; Touch and hold to access Siri; and Tap or hold + or – to control Volume up/down. The HomePod mini was available in black and white. This example is white.

I ordered this particular HomePod soon after it was released. While Apple packaging is well-known for its attention to detail, even the mailing box seemed to have received the Apple packaging treatment. The outer cardboard box featured a wraparound pull-tab that separated the box halves with no need for a tape-cutting blade. Once removed, the inner retail box was revealed which, surprisingly, was shrink-wrapped with no pull tab.

The AirPod mini used a permanently affixed USB-C cable and provided a 20W USB-C power adapter.

Source: Apple (Overview, Tech Specs)

Speaker Grille (for Power Mac G4 “mirrored drive doors,” 2002)

This Speaker Grille for the Power Mac G4 “mirrored drive doors” model was included to protect its single front speaker. The previous Power Mac G4 (“Quicksilver”) included a similar speaker design, but the speaker was located at the bottom-center of the tower and no grille was included. The Power Mac G4 “mirrored drive doors” design had four air vents across the bottom in the same position of the speaker on the “Quicksilver” design.

The manual references the speaker grill twice:

On page 11, “Don’t put anything in the recessed speaker opening except the optional speaker grille. Touching the speaker can damage it.”

And on page 15, “Speaker—Use the recessed internal speaker to hear sound from the computer. Take care not to let anything touch the fragile speaker mechanism. To protect the speaker from damage, a speaker grille is included with your computer. However, you’ll receive better sound quality without the grille.”

Source: Apple

Wireless Mighty Mouse (A1197, 2006)

The Wireless Mighty Mouse was a Bluetooth version of the (corded) Mighty Mouse that was released a year before it. The original Wireless Mighty Mouse used the same opaque white coloration as the corded Mighty Mouse.

The Mighty Mouse was the first Apple mouse to have multiple buttons. The buttons consisted of two touch-sensitive areas on the top of the mouse and two “squeeze areas” on the sides of the mouse. Because it had no physical buttons, the entire body of the mouse could be clicked. The top of the mouse also had a mini free-spinning track ball that allowed scrolling in any direction.

The Wireless Mighty Mouse makes a sound when the scroll ball is rolled that is produced by a tiny internal speaker in the mouse. The sound cannot be disabled by settings.

Source: Wikipedia.com

Mighty Mouse (A1152, 2005)

The Mighty Mouse was the first Apple mouse to have multiple buttons. The buttons consisted of two touch-sensitive areas on the top of the mouse and two “squeeze areas” on the sides of the mouse. Because it had no physical buttons, the entire body of the mouse could be clicked. The top of the mouse also had a mini free-spinning track ball that allowed scrolling in any direction.

The Mighty Mouse was opaque white with light gray touch-sensitive squeeze areas. The mini trackball on top was also light gray.

Mighty Mouse makes a sound when the scroll ball is rolled that is produced by a tiny internal speaker in the mouse. The sound cannot be disabled by settings.

In October 2009, Apple renamed the Mighty Mouse the “Apple Mouse” due to legal issues regarding the name. Although Apple had licensed the Mighty Mouse name from CBS (a cartoon character originating in 1942), another company had been selling a “mighty mouse” product before Apple. This is an example of Apple’s sometimes-confusing naming practices. in this case, Apple returned to using the name of a previous product (from 2003) that had a different design and different features.

Source: Wikipedia.com, arstechnica.com 

iPod touch Generation 2 (8 GB, 2008)

The iPod touch Generation 2 is similar in features to the iPhone 3G, but lacks phone features, mobile phone networking, GPS, and a camera. While the back of the iPod touch Generation 2 is made of stainless steel (instead of plastic), its shape is similar to the iPhone 3G.

The iPod touch Generation 2 featured a multi-touch 3.5-inch display with 320×480 resolution, an accelerometer, ambient light sensor, Wi-Fi (802.11b/g), and 8, 16, or 32 GB of flash memory.

Compared to the original iPod touch, the Generation 2 model adds external volume controls on the left side of the device, an integrated speaker, external microphone (supported via the Apple Earphones with Remote and Mic), support for the Nike+iPod Sport Kit, a Genius feature to dynamically create playlists, and shaking the device to shuffle songs.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod Hi-Fi (2006)

The iPod Hi-Fi was announced by Steve Jobs on February 28, 2006, in a keynote where he introduced the device as “Home stereo. Reinvented.” The speaker system included a 30-pin iPod connector on top and shipped with inserts for every iPod with a dock connector it has shipped until that time. The back of the iPod Hi-Fi included a 3.5mm stereo input so users with an iPod shuffle (or other device) could connect to the device.

The remote control that shipped with the iPod Hi-Fi, the same remote that shipped with iMac models at the time, could only control volume and skip between tracks within the selected playlist. The menu button switched between the dock and the audio-in port and could not control the functions of the iPod in the dock. Also, the iPod Hi-Fi can be used with all iPods with a dock connector, but will only charge iPods that support Firewire charging.

My example iPod Hi-Fi unfortunately has crushed speaker cones on the two smaller speakers. I’ve attempted a few remedies unsuccessfully.

The iPod Hi-Fi retailed at the Apple Store for $349. This price was higher than similar high-end iPod speaker systems at the time, including a then-popular system from Bose priced at $299. The iPod Hi-Fi was discontinued on September 5, 2007.

Source: Wikipedia

iPod nano Generation 5 (16 GB, blue, 2009)

The iPod nano Generation 5 was notable because of its impressive color choices. This model was available in nine colors: (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition, pink, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, silver, and black. The finish for the generation 5 nano is glossy and the case is made of aluminum and glass. It was available with 8 GB or 16 GB of flash memory (2000 or 4000 songs).

This iPod nano also features a video camera with an integrated microphone and speaker that takes advantage of its high-quality 2.2″ TFT display (240×376, 204 ppi). The video quality is H.264 VGA 640×480 at 30 FPS with AAC audio, but it cannot take still photographs. This iPod also has a built-in FM Radio with “live pause,” allowing pause and rewind up to 15 minutes.

My example is blue, and I remember using it as a back-up/additional video camera that had surprisingly good audio for its size.

Source: EveryMac.com