AppleShare Server 3.0 box (1992)

AppleShare 3 is an early implementation of a networking system by Apple that connected several network services in one package. This version, AppleShare 3.0, predates the Internet and serves primarily as a file sharing system and print server. AppleShare ran on a Macintosh Plus, Macintosh SE, or Macintosh Classic with 4 MB of RAM, and also on a Power Macintosh.

Low End Mac compiled information about AppleShare and published the following features:

  • requires System 7.0 or later
  • runs on 68000 or later with at least 4 MB RAM

For file services, Low End Mac reports that AppleShare 3 allows up to:

  • 120 connected users (v. 10 for file sharing)
  • 346 unique files open at one time
  • 50 shared volumes (vs. 10 for file sharing)
  • 8,192 users and groups (vs. 100 for file sharing)
  • 65,536 files per volume (limited by HFS file system)
  • 4 GB volume size (System 7.0 through 7.1 are limited to 2 GB)
  • 2 GB file size (requires AppleShare Workstation 3.5 or later on clients)

File sharing in AppleShare 3 was accomplished through AFP, Apple Filing Protocol (AFP), a proprietary network protocol that offered file services for the classic Mac OS.

This boxed version of AppleShare 3 is from 1992 and includes the original manuals and floppy disks required to install AppleShare on a Macintosh of the time.

Sources: Low End Mac, Wikipedia (AppleShare, AFP)

Apple CD media (1999)

My collection of Apple CD and DVD media includes operating systems, applications, software collections that shipped with devices, promotional media, diagnostic tools, and educational content. In general, Apple-branded CD or DVD examples in original packaging have been presented separately, while single discs or collections of discs are presented chronologically.

Apple CDs from 1999 include:

  • Mac OS 8.6 Updater CD (1999)
  • Mac OS 8.6 (Version 8.6, 691-2312-A, 1999)
  • Mac OS 9 (Version 9.0, 691-2386-A, 1999)
  • Macintosh PowerBook G3 Series Software Install (SSW version 9.0, 691-2458-A, 1999)
  • iMac Software Install (SSW version 8.6, CD version 1.1, 691-2376-A, 1999)
  • iMac Software Restore (SSW version 8.6, CD version 1.1, 691-2375-A, 1999)
  • Software Bundle (600-7647-A, 1999)
  • iBook Software Install (SSW version 9.0, 691-2472-A, 1999)
  • Apple Network Assistant (Version 4.0., Z691-2474-A, 1999)
  • SoftRAID For Power Mac G4 and Macintosh Server G4 computers (1999, SSW version 9.0, CD version 2.2.1, 691-2534-A, 1999)
  • AppleCare Service Source For Power Macintosh computers before G3 (includes AppleCare License Booklet, November 691-2508-A, 1999)

Apple shipped CD bundles in cardboard envelope packages in 1999. The envelope design shown here is orange with a white Apple logo.

Apple TV/Video System (1994)

The Apple TV/Video System was a kit consisting of two hardware components, software, a handheld remote, and user manuals. The system allowed any Apple Power Macintosh, Macintosh Quadra, Macintosh LC, or Macintosh Performa to “Watch TV, capture video images, and create multimedia—all on your Macintosh.”

The specific components in the box included: Apple TV Tuner, Apple Video Player Card, Apple Video Player software, Remote control, and a User’s guide. The box also indicated that “your remote control might look different from the one shown here.” Indeed, the remote pictured on the box is not the one that shipped with any of the systems I have ever seen.

The box also lists the system’s features (in a bulleted list): “Lets you watch TV in a window that appears on the desktop of your Macintosh. Includes a remote control that lets you switch channels, adjust the volume, and control your CD player. Allows you to connect your camcorder or VCR to your Macintosh, and watch the video footage in a window on the display. Lets you capture a single image or a series of images that you can add to reports, letters, and presentations. Features an easy-to-use control panel that gives you one-button image and movie capture. Lets you resize the TV/video window up to the full size of your screen; you can place it anywhere on your desktop.”

Since this system was released before iMovie was created, it also included the Avid VideoShop 3.0 software on CD. At the time, this system was the easiest method for watching TV/video on a Macintosh, and it introduced a low-cost way to edit videos.

I remember that these systems were offered at no additional cost to education with certain Macintosh and Power Macintosh purchases.

Source: Apple