Nike+iPod Sport Kit (2006)

The Nike+iPod Sport Kit was announced on May 23, 2006. A press released stated, “Nike and Apple today announced a partnership bringing the worlds of sports and music together like never before with the launch of innovative Nike+iPod products.” The two-piece wireless system included an oval sensor that was placed inside a Nike+ shoe and a 30-pin plug for the iPod nano.

Software on the iPod nano would connect to custom Nike+ footwear or any shoe with the Nike+iPod sensor attached and provided information on time, distance, calories burned, and pace on the iPod screen. In addition, “A new Nike Sport Music section on the iTunes Music Store and a new nikeplus.com personal service site help maximize the Nike+iPod experience.”

This kit was sold for $29 and included an in-shoe sensor and a receiver that attached to iPod. I used this device with both an iPod nano and with the first two iPhone models both on a treadmill and during my walks and run/walks. I attached the device to my running shoe laces with a purpose-built case that held the oval sensor. A later pair of shoes had a built-in slot in the arch of the sole that held the sensor.

Source: Apple.com

iPod nano Generation 4 (8 GB, blue, 2008)

Replacing the “squat” design of the Generation 3, the iPod nano Generation 4 returned to a “skinny” design similar to its predecessors. The new wraparound curved aluminum and glass case was offered in an unprecedented nine colors: silver, black, purple, blue, green, yellow, orange, pink, and (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition. The display was a wide-format 2-inch (diagonal) color LCD display at 320×240.

The iPod nano Generation 4 used either 8 GB or 16 GB of flash memory, capable of storing 2000 or 4000 songs, 7000 or 14,000 photos, and 8 hours or 16 hours of video. All colors were offered for both capacities.

The iPod nano Generation 4 features included an accelerometer (automatically switched to “Cover Flow” navigation in landscape orientation), games and videos only played in landscape, a new Genius feature to dynamically create playlists, and shake-to-shuffle for songs. Accessibility options were added including larger text and spoken menu items. It also included Nike+iPod support, FM radio tagging (using the Apple Radio Remote), support for audio crossfade, and games including Maze, Klondike, and Vortex.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod nano Generation 3 (8 GB, red, 2007)

The iPod nano Generation 3 used a design unique to the iPod family with “squat” proportions in a thin case. It was available in 4 GB or 8 GB versions, with the 4 GB model offered only in silver, and the 8 GB models offered in silver, light blue, light green, black, and (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition, and later pink option was added. All models had a chrome stainless steel back.

Compared to the iPod nano Generation 2, the Generation 3 added a larger 2-inch (diagonal) color LCD display at 320×240 resolution, support for video on the internal display, and video out via the dock.

The software is greatly improved with enhancements including a Cover Flow option for selecting albums. Three games were also bundled: iQuiz, Klondike, and Vortex.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod nano Generation 2 (8 GB, black, 2006)

The iPod nano Generation 2 borrowed a design concept from the iPod mini and added several more available colors: the 2 GB model was available in silver; the 4 GB model in silver, green, blue, and pink; and the 8 GB model was available in black only. It was available with 2 GB, 4 GB, or 8 GB of flash memory and stored 500, 1000, or 2000 songs.

Hardware enhancements from the original iPod nano included longer battery life of 24 hours, a brighter 1.5-inch display, and a search engine for loaded songs.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod nano (original, 4 GB, white, 2005)

The iPod nano replaced the iPod mini as a full-featured alternative to the classic iPod at the time. The iPod nano featured 1, 2, or 4 GB of flash memory in a 3.5-inch tall, 1.6-inch wide, and 0.27-inch thick white or black case. The color screen measured 1.5 inches at 176×132. The iPod nano is navigated by a Click Wheel and supports viewing photos. The design of the case features a jet black or iBook white front and stainless steel back.

Software functions included Screen Lock, a stopwatch, and a world clock. The iPod nano held approximately 240, 500, or 1000 songs and up to 15,000 or 25,000 photos that were downsampled to fit on the 1.5-inch screen.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod nano Generation 2 (4 GB, green, 2006, unopened)

The iPod nano Generation 2 was available in 2 GB, 4 GB, or 8 GB flash memory capacities, capable of supporting either 500, 1000, or 2000 songs. In addition to songs, it could hold up to 25,000 photos on its 1.5 inch (diagonal) LCD display.

The 2 GB model was only available in silver; the 4 GB model was available in silver, green, blue, and pink; and the 8 GB model was only available in black.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod nano Generation 6 (8 GB, 2010)

The iPod nano Generation 6 was a major design change from previous iPod nano models. This iPod nano came in silver, graphite, blue, green, orange, pink, and (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition. Its design was a square aluminum and glass case with a clip on the back and a 1.54-inch Multitouch screen.

Although its interface looks similar to iOS, it cannot run iOS applications or games compatible with previous iPod models. Its features include a pedometer, FM radio with live pause, Nike+iPod functions, VoiceOver, and Shake to Shuffle.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod nano Generation 5 (16 GB, blue, 2009)

The iPod nano Generation 5 was notable because of its impressive color choices. This model was available in nine colors: (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition, pink, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, silver, and black. The finish for the generation 5 nano is glossy and the case is made of aluminum and glass. It was available with 8 GB or 16 GB of flash memory (2000 or 4000 songs).

This iPod nano also features a video camera with an integrated microphone and speaker that takes advantage of its high-quality 2.2″ TFT display (240×376, 204 ppi). The video quality is H.264 VGA 640×480 at 30 FPS with AAC audio, but it cannot take still photographs. This iPod also has a built-in FM Radio with “live pause,” allowing pause and rewind up to 15 minutes.

My example is blue, and I remember using it as a back-up/additional video camera that had surprisingly good audio for its size.

Source: EveryMac.com