Magic Mouse 2 (silver, 2019)

According to Apple:

The “Magic Mouse is wireless and rechargeable, with an optimized foot design that lets it glide smoothly across your desk. The Multi-Touch surface allows you to perform simple gestures such as swiping between web pages and scrolling through documents. The incredibly long-lasting internal battery will power your Magic Mouse for about a month or more between charges. It’s ready to go right out of the box and pairs automatically with your Mac, and it includes a woven USB-C to Lightning Cable that lets you pair and charge by connecting to a USB-C port on your Mac.”

Apple’s website referred to this product as the “Magic Mouse 2,” but as of August 2021, a search on apple.com returned “…the product you’re looking for is no longer available on apple.com.” Thus, Apple apparently renamed the product “Magic Mouse.”

This wireless Multi-Touch mouse was 0.85 inch high, 2.25 inches wide, 4.47 inches deep, and weighed 0.22 pound. It shipped with a Lightning to USB cable for charging. It required a Bluetooth-enabled Mac with OS X 10.11 or later, and also worked on an iPad with iPadOS 13.4 or later.

Source: Apple

Magic Mouse 2 (space gray, 2019)

According to Apple, the “Magic Mouse is wireless and rechargeable, with an optimized foot design that lets it glide smoothly across your desk. The Multi-Touch surface allows you to perform simple gestures such as swiping between web pages and scrolling through documents. The incredibly long-lasting internal battery will power your Magic Mouse for about a month or more between charges. It’s ready to go right out of the box and pairs automatically with your Mac, and it includes a woven USB-C to Lightning Cable that lets you pair and charge by connecting to a USB-C port on your Mac.”

Apple’s website referred to this product as the “Magic Mouse 2,” but as of August 2021, a search on apple.com returned “…the product you’re looking for is no longer available on apple.com.” Thus, Apple apparently renamed the product “Magic Mouse.”

This wireless Multi-Touch mouse was 0.85 inch high, 2.25 inches wide, 4.47 inches deep, and weighed 0.22 pound. It shipped with a Lightning to USB cable for charging. It required a Bluetooth-enabled Mac with OS X 10.11 or later, and also worked on an iPad with iPadOS 13.4 or later.

This Space Gray color was discontinued some time in Summer 2021.

Source: Apple

iPhone Lightning Dock (silver, 2015)

The iPhone Lightning Dock was a minimalist charging dock with a heavy base, protruding angled Lightning connector, and two ports on the back—a Lightning port and an audio jack to allow music to be played on a speaker or headphones.

The iPhone Lightning Dock was available in several colors during its lifetime, including white, black, silver, space gray, rose gold, gold, and “new” gold (to match an updated gold iPhone color). This example is silver.

Apple described the Dock: “You can use it to charge and sync any iPhone that has a Lightning connector. Your iPhone sits upright in the dock as it syncs or charges, so it’s ideal for a desk or countertop. Even when your iPhone is in an Apple-designed case, it’s easy to dock. And you can unlock iPhone or use Touch ID without having to remove it from the dock.”

Source: Apple

Lightning to USB Cable (1 m, 2015)

Apple has sold and included their Lightning to USB Cable in various formats and packaging options over the years. This version of the product and packaging is part number ZM826-0420-B. Apple specifies that the Lightning to USB Cable is “Compatible with all models with a Lightning connector.”

iPhone Lightning Dock (Space Gray, 2015)

The iPhone Lightning Dock was a minimalist charging dock with a heavy base, protruding angled Lightning connector, and two ports on the back, including a Lightning port for charging and an audio jack to allow music to be played on a speaker or headphones while the iPhone charged.

The iPhone Lightning Dock was available in several colors, including white, black, silver, space gray, rose gold, gold, and “new” gold (to match an updated gold iPhone color). This example is space gray.

Apple described the Dock:

“You can use it to charge and sync any iPhone that has a Lightning connector. Your iPhone sits upright in the dock as it syncs or charges, so it’s ideal for a desk or countertop. Even when your iPhone is in an Apple-designed case, it’s easy to dock. And you can unlock iPhone or use Touch ID without having to remove it from the dock.”

Although this Dock will also charge an iPad, its size and weight make it too unstable for everyday use. However, I sometimes use this Dock to photograph iPad devices in my collection since its minimal design and slight angle works well as a temporary display base.

Source: Apple

iPhone 5s (space gray, 2013)

The iPhone 5s was released in 2013 as a successor to the iPhone 5. While previous “s” updates delivered only slight enhancements, the 5s had major upgrades internally and externally. The iPhone 5s included an A7 chip (Apple’s first 64-bit “system-on-a-chip”), Apple’s first fingerprint Touch ID, and greatly enhanced cameras with a flash system that used different color temperatures.

The iPhone 5s was offered in three metallic colors: silver (white glass front with a metallic sliver back), gold (white glass front with a metallic gold back), and space gray (black glass front with metallic gunmetal gray back). Its touch screen was a Retina display (1136 x 640). The back camera was an 8-megapixel iSight camera (1080p), and the front camera was a 1.2 megapixel FaceTime camera (720p).

The A7 chip that powered the iPhone 5s ran at 1.3 GHz and storage was offered at 16, 32, or 64 GB. Wireless connections included 802.11n Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.0, and 4G/LTE. Wired connections included the Lightning connector and a standard headphone jack.

This was the first iPhone to ship with iOS 7, the first iOS version designed under Jony Ive that removed the previous “skeuomorphic” design aesthetic that used true-life design elements such as faux textures, drop shadows, glossy surfaces, beveled edges, and other real-world visual cues (e.g., the Notes app icon resembled a legal pad with torn-off pages, the Newsstand app icon that resembled a book case). Instead, iOS 7 icons and interfaces were flat and featured a defined colorful palette.

Sources: Everymac, Wikipedia

iPad (Generation 4, Wi-Fi, black, 2012)

The iPad Generation 4 was referred to by Apple officially as the “iPad with Retina Display.” Similar in many ways to the iPad Generation 3 before it, the iPad Generation 4 replaced the 30-pin dock connector with the Lightning port, and also offered incremental upgrades.

The Retina Display increased the touchscreen resolution to 2048×1536 (at 264 ppi). Internally, the iPad Generation 4 used a dual-core 1.4 GHz A6X processor, 1 GB of RAM, and was offered with 16, 32, 64, or 128 GB of storage. Its back 5-megapixel iSight camera could record video at 1080p, and its front FaceTime HD camera could record video at 720p. Wireless connectivity included 802.11n Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.0.

The iPad Generation 4 was available in black and white (both options had a silver aluminum back). This example is black.

Source: Everymac

iPad (Generation 4, Wi-Fi, white, 2012)

The iPad Generation 4 was referred to by Apple officially as the “iPad with Retina Display.” Similar in many ways to the iPad Generation 3 before it, the iPad Generation 4 replaced the 30-pin dock connector with the Lightning port, and also offered incremental upgrades.

The Retina Display increased the touchscreen resolution to 2048×1536 (at 264 ppi). Internally, the iPad Generation 4 used a dual-core 1.4 GHz A6X processor, 1 GB of RAM, and was offered with 16, 32, 64, or 128 GB of storage. Its back 5-megapixel iSight camera could record video at 1080p, and its front FaceTime HD camera could record video at 720p. Wireless connectivity included 802.11n Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.0.

The iPad Generation 4 was available in black and white (both options had a silver aluminum back). This Wi-Fi example is in white.

Source: Everymac

iPhone XR (packaging, 2018, 2020)

In 2020 Apple made a major change to its iPhone 12 packaging when they stopped including Lightning headphones and a wall power “brick” charger in the box at the time of an iPhone purchase. With these items removed, Apple was able to reduce the size of the iPhone box and reduce the extra packaging associated with the headphones and charger. It was announced that the iPhone 12 would ship only with the phone and a USB-C-to-Lightning charging cable.

Lisa Jackson, Apple’s Vice President of Environment, Policy, and Social Initiatives, announced at an October 2020 Apple event, “Customers already have over 700 million Lightning headphones, and many customers have moved to a wireless experience with AirPods, Beats, or other wireless headphones. And there are also over 2 billion Apple power adapters out in the world, and that’s not counting the billions of third-party adapters. So we are removing these items from the iPhone box.”

With the iPhone 12 announcement, I was not at all expecting this packaging change to also affect older, but still manufactured iPhone models. At the time of the iPhone 12 release, Apple was still offering the iPhone XR as a lower-end and less expensive iPhone option. Surprisingly, the iPhone XR packaging was also reduced in size and shipped without the headphones and charger. Also, the cable was switched to a USB-C-to-Lightning, replacing the former USB-to-Lightning option.

While the change may contribute to some environmental benefits, the situation was not universally accepted as positive. Some critics noted that, “The move saves the company money, but some of the environmental benefits could be offset by people buying earbuds and chargers separately” (The Verge). From a practical standpoint, some users—namely enterprise, government, and school districts like mine—had not switched to USB-C when this decision was made. As Apple indicated, it is likely that most users likely already have more than one charger and at least one set of Lightning headphones.

The photos here represent my school district’s iPhone XR upgrade affected mid-stream—where iPhone XR models purchased before October 2020 used “classic” packaging, and devices purchased in late-October/November 2020 unexpectedly used the new packaging without an announcement or warning.

Sources: AppleInsider, The Verge

Lightning to USB Cable (2012)

Apple has sold and included their Lightning to USB Cable in various formats and packaging options. This version of packaging is part number MD818ZM/A. It specifies that the Lightning to USB Cable is “Compatible with all models with a Lightning connector.”