Mac OS 9 9.0.4 box (2000)

Mac OS 9 was Apple’s final version of its “Classic” operating system. This iteration, version 9.0.4, was released April 4, 2000, and its changes included “Improved USB and FireWire support and other bug fixes.”

This specific boxed version is a 10-client license and features iTools, Apple’s first suite of online services that would eventually become iCloud.

The box also mentions that Mac OS 9 introduces “more than 50 new features” and includes “nine Internet power tools.” The tools include:

  1. Sherlock 2
  2. Multiple Users
  3. Voiceprint Password
  4. Keychain
  5. Auto Updating
  6. Encryption
  7. File Sharing over the Internet
  8. AppleScript over TCP/IP
  9. Network Browser

Source: Wikipedia

Education Resource CD Winter 2000 (2000)

This Education Resource CD is dated Winter 2000. Its design features a rendition of the glossy 3D tabs on the apple.com website at the time. The toolbox image at the bottom of the CD matched the iTools design. iTools is a precursor to what has become Apple iCloud services.

iPod 6-pin–to–4-pin FireWire Adapter (for iPod Generation 3, 2003)

The iPod 6-pin–to–4-pin FireWire Adapter was specifically included with the iPod Generation 3 (Dock Connector) to make it compatible with Windows computers. According to the iPod User’s Guide:

To use iPod with a Windows PC, you must have:
• A Windows PC with 500 MHz or higher processor speed
• Windows 2000 with Service Pack 4 or later, or Windows XP Home or Professional
• iTunes 4.2 or later (iTunes is included on the iPod CD). To be sure you have the latest version of iTunes, go to www.apple.com/itunes.
• iPod software (included on the iPod CD)
• Built-in FireWire or a FireWire card installed, or built-in USB 2.0 or a USB 2.0 card and the optional iPod Dock Connector to USB 2.0 + FireWire Cable

Although all Mac computers at the time had a 6-pin FireWire port built in, Windows computers had many different possible ports. For Windows, the iPod Generation 3 could support three connectors: USB port (USB 2.0 recommended), 6-pin FireWire 400 port (IEEE 1394), or 4-pin FireWire 400 port (with included adapter).

The 4-pin FireWire adapter only supported data transfer, it could not charge the iPod.

Source: Apple (manual, Identify your iPod model)

iSight Camera (original, 2003)

The original iSight camera was an external webcam that connected to a Mac via FireWire cable. The iSight camera supported 640×480 resolution at 30 frames per second with autoexposure and autofocus. It includes its own microphones with noise suppression features. The camera used a single FireWire port for audio, video, and power. It weighed 2.3 ounces.

The iSight included five camera mounts (four clear acrylic mounts and one magnetic base) and a clear plastic tube for transporting the camera. 

Apple stopped selling this external iSight camera in 2008 when all Mac laptops and iMac computers began including a built-in iSight camera.

Reference: Wikipedia.com

iPod Dock (2003)

When the iPod switched its connector from a FireWire port to the proprietary 30-pin Dock Connector, several new compatibility and hardware features became available. Because the Dock Connector handled data, sound, and charging capabilities, a variety of connection options were available. 

The iPod Dock allowed a connected iPod to simultaneously charge, send sound to an external stereo system through a line-out port in the back, and respond to commands from an Apple Remote control device.

Source: Apple-History.com

PowerBook G3 500 (MHz) (“Pismo,” 2000)

The PowerBook G3 500 was a member of the PowerBook FireWire family and referred to by its codename, “Pismo.” It featured a 500 MHz PowerPC 750 (G3) processor, 128 MB of RAM, a 12.0 GB or 20.0 GB hard drive, and a tray-loading 6X DVD-ROM drive. The screen was a 14.1-inch TFT active-matrix color display.

Although the PowerBook G3 shares a case that is similar to the “Lombard” PowerBook G3 models that came before them (with a bronze keyboard), the “Pismo” PowerBooks used a faster logic board, a faster hard drive, and faster graphics. Pismo PowerBooks also supported optional AirPort (802.11b), and included dual FireWire ports.

This laptop cost $3,499 when it was released.

Source: EveryMac.com

iBook G3/366 (indigo, 2000)

The iBook G3/366 is similar to the original iBook G3/300 in design, but adds two new colors, a single FireWire port, and several internal upgrades.

The iBook G3/366 featured a 366 MHz G3 processor, 64 MB RAM, a 10.0 GB hard drive, a 24X tray-loading CD-ROM drive, and a 12.1-inch display at 800×600. This example is in indigo, a color Apple selected likely due to the popularity of the indigo iMac at the time. It also introduced a new hybrid A/V port that allowed composite audio/video out capabilities using a proprietary cable.

I remember when this laptop was released and it quickly became my “go to” device for portable video creation in iMovie for its faster processor and FireWire capabilities. It was among the first consumer-level laptops that began to feel like it had similar capabilities to the desktops at the time.

Source: EveryMac.com

iBook G3/366 (key lime, 2000)

The iBook G3/366 is similar to the original iBook G3/300 in design, but adds two new colors, a single FireWire port, and several internal upgrades.

The iBook G3/366 featured a 366 MHz G3 processor, 64 MB RAM, a 10.0 GB hard drive, a 24X tray-loading CD-ROM drive, and a 12.1-inch display at 800×600. This iBook is in key lime, an extremely vibrant shade of neon green.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod (original, 2001)

While Apple was not the first to offer an MP3 player, they often get the credit for making the product get accepted into the mainstream with its groundbreaking design, features, and perhaps more importantly, the iTunes software experience that would eventually add the iTunes Store and completely change the course of the music industry.

The iPod was about the size of a deck of playing cards, white on the front, and polished stainless steel on the back. The look that quickly became iconic. The front of the original iPod used a rotating scroll wheel surrounded by four physical buttons—menu, forward, back, and play/pause—with an unmarked select button at the center. The design introduced a brand new operating system that allowed easy navigation to songs and playlists and could be controlled with one hand.

The original iPod required a Mac with iTunes. The iTunes software on the Mac provided the organization for the music and playlists and the iPod allowed your music to be portable. It featured a 5 GB hard drive to store 1,000 songs, a 60-mW amplifier, a FireWire port, and a standard 3.5-mm headphone jack, and a 2-inch black and white backlit LCD display. The battery lasted 10 hours. A 10 GB option was available after March 21, 2002, increasing the storage to 2,000 songs.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod Generation 2 (2002)

The iPod Generation 2 was similar to the original iPod in design, but the moving scroll wheel was replaced by a stationary touch-sensitive scroll wheel. In addition, the FireWire port gained a cover. The top of the iPod design also changed to allow the buttons to be surrounded by stainless steel cutouts instead of the plastic top used in the original iPod. Accessories were also added including a wired remote control, a thinner Firewire cable, and a carrying case.

The iPod Generation 2 was offered in 10 GB and 20 GB models and also added Windows compatibility.

Other than the increased hard drive sizes that allowed the iPod to hold up to 4,000 songs in the 20 GB model, the other specifications were the same as the original iPod: a 60-mW amplifier, a FireWire port, and a standard 3.5-mm headphone jack, and a 2-inch black and white backlit LCD display, and a 10-hour battery.

Source: EveryMac.com