Mac Pro (Quad Core, 2.8 GHz, Mid-2010)

The Mac Pro Quad Core 2.8 uses a single 2.8 GHz Quad Core Xeon W3530 processor. The “quad core” designation refers to its single processor with four independent “core” processing centers that can work independently or together to increase computing speed and efficiency. It used 3 GB of RAM (DDR3 ECC SDRAM), a 1 TB Serial ATA hard drive, an 18X dual-layer SuperDrive, and an ATI Radeon HD 5770 graphics card.

The design of this tower was identical to its Power Mac G5 predecessor, using the same anodized aluminum alloy case with a removable side panel. The sides of the tower were solid aluminum with a light gray Apple logo printed on center. The front and back used a pattern of aluminum perforations as a design element, a structural feature, and as part of the ventilation for the internal systems.

The front of the tower included spaces for two optical drives at the top. On the lower-right was the power button and five ports: 3.5 mm headphone jack, two USB ports, and two FireWire 800 ports.

The back of the tower included five slots. Slot 1 includes a dual-link DVI port and two Mini DisplayPorts. Slot 2 is unused (and uses a ventilated cover), while slots 3–5 are unused. Rear ports include three USB 2.0 ports, two FireWire 800 ports, optical digital audio in/out ports, a 3.5 mm line-out audio jack, a 3.5 mm line-in audio jack, and two independent Gigabit Ethernet ports. Internally, wireless networking options include AirPort Extreme (802.11a/b/g/n) and Bluetooth 2.1.

Inside, the Mac Pro includes two 5.25-inch optical drive bays (both are outfitted with Apple SuperDrive drives in this example); four internal 3.5-inch cable-free, direct-attach hard drive bays (this model has three 512 GB drives); and four PCIe 2.0 slots, one with a graphics card installed.

Source: Everymac

Power Mac G5 (Dual Core, 2.3 GHz, 2005)

The Power Mac G5 tower represented a major design departure from the four previous Mac “pro” tower designs. The Power Mac G5 used an anodized aluminum alloy case design with a removable side panel that replaced the hinged door on previous Mac towers.

The sides of the Power Mac G5 were solid aluminum with a light gray Apple logo printed on center. The front and back used a pattern of aluminum perforations as design elements, structure, and as part of the ventilation for the internal systems.

This model is a Power Mac G5 Dual Core running at 2.3 GHz. The same design was available in a G5 Dual Core (2.0 GHz) and a G5 Quad Core (2.5 GHz) variation, with all models using 970MP G5 processors with two independent cores on a single chip. This tower included 512 MB or 1 GB RAM (SDRAM), a 250 GB (Serial ATA) hard drive, a 16x dual-layer SuperDrive, and a NVIDIA GeForce 6600 video card.

The front of the tower included a single optical drive, the power button, and three ports: one 3.5 mm headphone jack, one USB port, and a FireWire 400 port.

The back of the tower included four slots. Slot 1 includes two DVI ports (one single-link DVI and one dual-link DVI port), while slots 2–4 are unused. Rear ports include two independent Gigabit Ethernet ports, one FireWire 400 port, one FireWire 800 port, optical digital audio in/out ports, a 3.5 mm line-out audio jack, a 3.5 mm line-in audio jack, and three USB 2.0 ports.

Internally, the tower supports AirPort Extreme (802.11g) and Bluetooth 2.0 wireless protocols. Everymac reports that the inside of Power Mac G5 models were divided into “four different thermal zones with nine computer-controlled fans for optimum cooling.” Also, this Power Mac G5 has two internal hard drives.

The case design with its front and back aluminum perforations and handles is, indeed, reminiscent of a cheese grater—albeit a beautiful one.

Source: Everymac

Mini-DVI to DVI Adapter (DVI-D) (M9321G/B, 2005)

Beginning in 2005, Apple released several computers with a Mini-DVI port, including the 12-inch PowerBook G4, Intel-based iMac, the MacBook Intel-based laptop, the Intel-based Xserve, the 2009 Mac mini, and some late model eMacs.

The port was only used until 2008 when it was replaced with the Mini DisplayPort. The port is used instead of a full-size DVI connector to save physical space while allowing the computer to be connected to a DVI-D display.

Sources: EveryMac, B&H Photo Video, Wikipedia

DVI to VGA Adapter (2005)

Apple’s DVI to VGA Adapter shipped with the original Mac mini (2005). Because the original Mac mini Video out port was designed for displays that use a DVI connector, the computer also shipped with this compact DVI to VGA Adapter. This adapter allowed the Mac mini to work with a then-standard VGA display.

Source: Apple, EveryMac

MacBook Pro 15-inch (Core 2 Duo, 2.4 GHz, early 2008)

This MacBook Pro 15-inch laptop was released in early 2008 with an identical case design as its predecessor. It shipped with a 2.4 GHz Core 2 Duo (Penryn) processor and 2 GB of 667 MHz SDRAM. It contained a 200 GB hard drive and 8X DVD RW/CD-RW SuperDrive. The display was an LED-backlit 15.4-inch widescreen at 1440×900 resolution.

Although the external case did not change from the “Santa Rosa” processor version of the laptop that preceded it, the keyboard design removed the numeric keypad accessed using the fn (function) key and replaced the right-side enter key with an additional option key, the same laptop keyboard layout still in use now (as of February 2020). This MacBook Pro also used the same trackpad design as the MacBook Air of the time, adding multi-touch gestures.

Ports on this MacBook Pro included an ExpressCard slot, Gigabit Ethernet, FireWire 400, Firewire 800, two USB 2.0 ports, optical digital audio in/out, and DVI out. Wireless connections included AirPort Extreme (802.11a/b/g/n) and Bluetooth 2.1. It also included an iSight video camera and MagSafe power connector, both standard at the time.

When I acquired this laptop, its battery had burst while installed in the laptop. The battery failure caused the battery to bow in the center and it was lodged in the case. Using a few iFixIt spatula tools, I was able to extract it safely and then properly dispose of the ruptured battery.

Source: EveryMac

DVI to ADC Adapter (2002)

The Apple DVI to ADC Adapter allowed any Apple flat-panel display using an Apple Display Connector (ADC) to be used with any computer with a DVI port. The device included a power supply, power cord, and DVI/USB cable. Apple described the capabilities of the adapter:

“It has been carefully designed to maintain the digital integrity of the video signal for the best possible viewing experience. The adapter provides an all-digital signal path between the computer and the display. It features active components that regenerate both the digital graphics and USB signals coming from the computer. This ensures delivery of the highest-quality images even at the extremely fast signal rates used by the Apple Cinema HD Display.”

The purpose of the Apple Display Connector (ADC) was to reduce display cables. ADC combined DVI, power, and USB in a 30 pin (3 x 10) connector. ADC was used between 2000–2004. The primary issue with the proprietary ADC connection was that it carried power to the display (DVI does not), thus, a typical adapter was not possible. Instead, this adapter was relatively large because it included a power supply, measuring about 5 x 5 x 1.5 inches. It was also expensive for an adapter, selling for $99 when it was released.

Mac models that could use the Apple DVI to ADC adapter included Power Mac G4 (Mirrored Drive Doors, 2002–2003), Power Mac G5 (June 2003–Late 2005), PowerBook G4 15-inch (DVI, 2002–Double Layer SD, 2005), PowerBook G4 17-inch (2003–Double Layer SD, 2005), MacBook Pro 15-inch (Early 2006–Early 2008), MacBook Pro 17-inch (Early 2006–Late 2008), Mac mini (Early 2005–Mid 2007), and Mac Pro (Early 2006–Mid 2012).

Sources: macobserver.com, usedmacs.us, macofalltrades.com