iPhone Lightning Dock (black, 2015)

The iPhone Lightning Dock is a minimalist charging dock with a heavy base, protruding angled Lightning connector, and two ports on the back—a Lightning port and an audio jack to allow music to be played on a speaker or headphones.

The iPhone Lightning Dock has been available in several colors during its lifetime, including white, black, silver, space gray, rose gold, gold, and “new” gold (to match an updated gold iPhone color). This example is black.

Apple describes the dock: “You can use it to charge and sync any iPhone that has a Lightning connector. Your iPhone sits upright in the dock as it syncs or charges, so it’s ideal for a desk or countertop. Even when your iPhone is in an Apple-designed case, it’s easy to dock. And you can unlock iPhone or use Touch ID without having to remove it from the dock.”

Source: Apple

iPod shuffle Dock (for Generation 2 iPod shuffle, 2006)

Apple introduced the Generation 2 iPod shuffle in September 2006 and advertised it as “the most wearable iPod ever,” due to a clip on the back that could easily attach the iPod shuffle to clothing.

The iPod shuffle was so small that the 30-pin iPod dock could not be used to charge or transfer music and data to the device. Instead, the Generation 2 iPod shuffle used this iPod shuffle Dock. The dock connected to a computer with an attached USB cable and data transfer and recharging was handled through the dock’s headphone jack.

The iPod shuffle Dock was only available in white, even though the iPod shuffle was available in several colors [silver, two variations of pink, orange, green, and blue; and turquoise, lavender, mint green, and (PRODUCT)RED].

Source: Wikipedia

Composite AV Cable (unopened, 2010)

The Composite AV Cable allowed the connection of iPod, iPhone, or iPad to a television or stereo system. It allowed movies and videos to be viewed along with stereo sound from a device with a 30-pin connector. This cable did not allow the display to be  mirrored.

According to Apple.com, “The Composite AV Cable connects to your device or Universal Dock via the 30-pin dock connector and to your TV, home cinema receiver or stereo receiver via the composite video and red/white analogue audio ports. The cable also features a USB connector that you can plug in to a power source.”

This cable is unopened in a white box. It was later repackaged in a black box.

Reference: Apple.com, Wikipedia.org

iPod Dock (2003)

When the iPod switched its connector from a FireWire port to the proprietary 30-pin Dock Connector, several new compatibility and hardware features became available. Because the Dock Connector handled data, sound, and charging capabilities, a variety of connection options were available. 

The iPod Dock allowed a connected iPod to simultaneously charge, send sound to an external stereo system through a line-out port in the back, and respond to commands from an Apple Remote control device.

Source: Apple-History.com

iPod Hi-Fi (2006)

The iPod Hi-Fi was announced by Steve Jobs on February 28, 2006, in a keynote where he introduced the device as “Home stereo. Reinvented.” The speaker system included a 30-pin iPod connector on top and shipped with inserts for every iPod with a dock connector it has shipped until that time. The back of the iPod Hi-Fi included a 3.5mm stereo input so users with an iPod shuffle (or other device) could connect to the device.

The remote control that shipped with the iPod Hi-Fi, the same remote that shipped with iMac models at the time, could only control volume and skip between tracks within the selected playlist. The menu button switched between the dock and the audio-in port and could not control the functions of the iPod in the dock. Also, the iPod Hi-Fi can be used with all iPods with a dock connector, but will only charge iPods that support Firewire charging.

My example iPod Hi-Fi unfortunately has crushed speaker cones on the two smaller speakers. I’ve attempted a few remedies unsuccessfully.

The iPod Hi-Fi retailed at the Apple Store for $349. This price was higher than similar high-end iPod speaker systems at the time, including a then-popular system from Bose priced at $299. The iPod Hi-Fi was discontinued on September 5, 2007.

Source: Wikipedia