Lightning to USB Cable (2012)

Apple has sold and included their Lightning to USB Cable in various formats and packaging options. This version of packaging is part number MD818ZM/A. It specifies that the Lightning to USB Cable is “Compatible with all models with a Lightning connector.”

iPhone Bluetooth Headset cable (A1221, 2007)

The iPhone Bluetooth Headset cable is a unique 30-pin USB charging cable with an additional, offset magnetic charging port to accommodate the iPhone Bluetooth Headset. This allowed iPhone Bluetooth Headset users to charge both the original iPhone and the iPhone Bluetooth Headset from the same cable at the same time.

Source: Apple

Apple keyboard extension cable (2008)

Shortly after Apple began including USB keyboards with tower computers, they have included a USB extension cable in the box in the event the user wished to place the tower under a desk or otherwise far way from the keyboard. The extender is APple’s way of dealing with their notoriously short keyboard cables. The User’s Guide for the 2008 Mac Pro pictures this keyboard extension cable design and states: “If the keyboard cable isn’t long enough, use the keyboard extension cable that came with your Mac Pro.”

Apple has also followed a convention of placing a notch in their USB keyboard extenders. This notch matches a slot in the USB plug present in all Apple keyboards, thus allowing an Apple USB keyboard to be plugged into any standard USB port, but preventing the Apple keyboard extension cable to be used with anything except Apple USB keyboards with the slot in the USB plug.

Source: Apple

Apple Lockable Cable Fastener (unopened, 2001)

The Apple Lockable Cable Fastener is a metal clip with a hole meant to function as a security device. To use the fastener, several cables would be bundled in the clip and a padlock would be fed through the holes so the device cables and devices (mouse, keyboard, speakers, etc.) could not be easily removed and stolen.

One illustration on the manual shows an Apple Pro Keyboard, Apple Pro Mouse, and the speakers that shipped with the G4 Cube (2001). Thus, this Lockable Cable Fastener likely shipped with a G4 Cube.

Source: Apple

Mini-DVI to DVI Adapter (DVI-D) (M9321G/B, 2005)

Beginning in 2005, Apple released several computers with a Mini-DVI port, including the 12-inch PowerBook G4, Intel-based iMac, the MacBook Intel-based laptop, the Intel-based Xserve, the 2009 Mac mini, and some late model eMacs.

The port was only used until 2008 when it was replaced with the Mini DisplayPort. The port is used instead of a full-size DVI connector to save physical space while allowing the computer to be connected to a DVI-D display.

Sources: EveryMac, B&H Photo Video, Wikipedia

Apple DVI-D Male to DVI-D Female Cable Adapter (603-8471, 2006)

When the original Mac Pro was released in 2006, it included two side-by-side DVI-D connectors (Digital Visual Interface) on the back so two DVI displays could be connected at the same time.

Since the ports were close together, Apple shipped this DVI-D Male to DVI-D Female Cable Adapter in the event that the cable interface of the display was too wide to fit the connectors from both displays. The adapter’s function is to extend the port an extra six inches from the computer.

Sources: Apple (via B&H Photo Video), macofalltrades

Composite Video Cable (2000)

The Composite Video Cable shipped with various iBook models and allowed the iBook to be connected to an external TV and/or stereo.

The cable shipped with the following iBook laptops: iBook (FireWire), iBook (Dual USB), iBook (Late 2001), iBook (14.1-inch).

Source: emc2cs.com

Macintosh PowerBook Video Cable (1992)

The Macintosh PowerBook Video Cable allowed PowerBook 100-series laptops to be connected to Apple monitors sold in the early 1990s. Both ends of the cable were Apple-proprietary.

This cable allowed users of the earliest PowerBook series, such as the PowerBook 160 with a grayscale-only display, to plug into a color Apple monitor and use the PowerBook with a color screen.

According to an Apple Support document, the cable supported a resolution of 832×624 and was compatible with the following laptops: PowerBook 1400-series, PowerBook 190-series, PowerBook 520-series, PowerBook 5300-series, PowerBook 540-series, PowerBook 550c [Japan Only], PowerBook 160/165/180, and PowerBook 165c/180c.

Source: Apple

Composite AV Cable (unopened, 2010)

The Composite AV Cable allowed the connection of iPod, iPhone, or iPad to a television or stereo system. It allowed movies and videos to be viewed along with stereo sound from a device with a 30-pin connector. This cable did not allow the display to be  mirrored.

According to Apple.com, “The Composite AV Cable connects to your device or Universal Dock via the 30-pin dock connector and to your TV, home cinema receiver or stereo receiver via the composite video and red/white analogue audio ports. The cable also features a USB connector that you can plug in to a power source.”

This cable is unopened in a white box. It was later repackaged in a black box.

Reference: Apple.com, Wikipedia.org

Macintosh TV (1993)

I acquired my Macintosh TV in the early 2000s in an eBay purchase. This 1993 Macintosh is said to be among the most rare with sources reporting between 8,000 and 10,000 manufactured. The machine is based upon the Macintosh LC 520, but it came standard with a TV and FM tuner card with a remote control. The computer was Apple’s first computer to ship standard with a cable-ready (BNC port) television built in.

One of the rare elements about this computer is that it was all black, including the ADB mouse and keyboard, both the standard issue at the time of manufacture. At the time, all other Macintosh computers were beige.

The CD player uses a tray cartridge design. To insert a CD, you remove the tray, open the clear plastic tray lid, insert the CD, and then insert the tray cartridge into the CD slot. The CD slot is labeled “CD Caddy.”

When I did the photo shoot for my Macintosh TV, I noticed that rust had formed around the serial and printer ports in the back of the computer. I removed the back and slid out the motherboard to found that the internal battery had ruptured and corroded many of the surrounding parts. I cleaned the inside of the board and removed the battery. I also didn’t attempt to start the computer since several components on the board were affected.

Source: EveryMac.com.