Apple CD and DVD media (2008)

My collection of Apple CD and DVD media includes operating systems, applications, software collections that shipped with devices, promotional media, diagnostic tools, and educational content. In general, Apple-branded CD or DVD examples in original packaging have been presented separately, while single discs or collections of discs are presented chronologically.

Apple CDs and DVDs from 2008 include:

  • Mac Pro Mac OS X Install Disc 1 (Mac OS X version 10.5.2, AHT version 3A146, Disc version 1.2, 2Z691-6202-A, 2008)
  • AppleSeed, Mac OS X Server Leopard Install DVD (Version 10.5.4, Build 9E26, 2008)
  • AppleSeed, Mac OS X Leopard Install DVD (Version 10.5.4, Build 9E25, 2008)
  • Aperture 2 Install (Version 2.1, 0Z691-6229-A, 2008)
  • AppleCare Protection Plan (0Z691-6203-A, 2008)
  • Xsan 2 Install Disc (Version 2, 0Z691-6025-A, 2008)
  • Software Bundle (unopened, 607-3207, AirPort Extreme, 2008)

Mac Pro (Quad Core, 2.8 GHz, Mid-2010)

The Mac Pro Quad Core 2.8 uses a single 2.8 GHz Quad Core Xeon W3530 processor. The “quad core” designation refers to its single processor with four independent “core” processing centers that can work independently or together to increase computing speed and efficiency. It used 3 GB of RAM (DDR3 ECC SDRAM), a 1 TB Serial ATA hard drive, an 18X dual-layer SuperDrive, and an ATI Radeon HD 5770 graphics card.

The design of this tower was identical to its Power Mac G5 predecessor, using the same anodized aluminum alloy case with a removable side panel. The sides of the tower were solid aluminum with a light gray Apple logo printed on center. The front and back used a pattern of aluminum perforations as a design element, a structural feature, and as part of the ventilation for the internal systems.

The front of the tower included spaces for two optical drives at the top. On the lower-right was the power button and five ports: 3.5 mm headphone jack, two USB ports, and two FireWire 800 ports.

The back of the tower included five slots. Slot 1 includes a dual-link DVI port and two Mini DisplayPorts. Slot 2 is unused (and uses a ventilated cover), while slots 3–5 are unused. Rear ports include three USB 2.0 ports, two FireWire 800 ports, optical digital audio in/out ports, a 3.5 mm line-out audio jack, a 3.5 mm line-in audio jack, and two independent Gigabit Ethernet ports. Internally, wireless networking options include AirPort Extreme (802.11a/b/g/n) and Bluetooth 2.1.

Inside, the Mac Pro includes two 5.25-inch optical drive bays (both are outfitted with Apple SuperDrive drives in this example); four internal 3.5-inch cable-free, direct-attach hard drive bays (this model has three 512 GB drives); and four PCIe 2.0 slots, one with a graphics card installed.

Source: Everymac

Power Mac G5 (Dual Core, 2.3 GHz, 2005)

The Power Mac G5 tower represented a major design departure from the four previous Mac “pro” tower designs. The Power Mac G5 used an anodized aluminum alloy case design with a removable side panel that replaced the hinged door on previous Mac towers.

The sides of the Power Mac G5 were solid aluminum with a light gray Apple logo printed on center. The front and back used a pattern of aluminum perforations as design elements, structure, and as part of the ventilation for the internal systems.

This model is a Power Mac G5 Dual Core running at 2.3 GHz. The same design was available in a G5 Dual Core (2.0 GHz) and a G5 Quad Core (2.5 GHz) variation, with all models using 970MP G5 processors with two independent cores on a single chip. This tower included 512 MB or 1 GB RAM (SDRAM), a 250 GB (Serial ATA) hard drive, a 16x dual-layer SuperDrive, and a NVIDIA GeForce 6600 video card.

The front of the tower included a single optical drive, the power button, and three ports: one 3.5 mm headphone jack, one USB port, and a FireWire 400 port.

The back of the tower included four slots. Slot 1 includes two DVI ports (one single-link DVI and one dual-link DVI port), while slots 2–4 are unused. Rear ports include two independent Gigabit Ethernet ports, one FireWire 400 port, one FireWire 800 port, optical digital audio in/out ports, a 3.5 mm line-out audio jack, a 3.5 mm line-in audio jack, and three USB 2.0 ports.

Internally, the tower supports AirPort Extreme (802.11g) and Bluetooth 2.0 wireless protocols. Everymac reports that the inside of Power Mac G5 models were divided into “four different thermal zones with nine computer-controlled fans for optimum cooling.” Also, this Power Mac G5 has two internal hard drives.

The case design with its front and back aluminum perforations and handles is, indeed, reminiscent of a cheese grater—albeit a beautiful one.

Source: Everymac

AirPort Extreme Card (2003)

The AirPort Extreme Card card replaced Apple’s original AirPort card in 2003. The first computers designed to use this card were the iBook G4/800 12-inch (original) and the iMac G4 1.0 17-inch (flat panel).

Apple devices with wireless capabilities after the AirPort Extreme Card had Wi-Fi as a standard feature built in to the architecture beginning in mid-2005. Beginning in 2006 with the Intel-based MacBook Pro, Apple used non-Apple-branded internal wireless cards (e.g., Atheros, Broadcom).

According to Apple’s AirPort Extreme Card User’s Guide:

AirPort Extreme Card Specifications
• Wireless Data Rate: Up to 54 megabits per second (Mbps)
• Range: Up to 150 feet (45 meters) from the base station in typical indoor use
(varies with building)
• Frequency Band: 2.4 gigahertz (GHz)
• Radio Output Power: 15 dBm (nominal)
• Standards: Compliant with 802.11 HR Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS)
11 Mbps standard, 802.11 DSSS 1 and 2 Mbps standard, and 802.11g specification

Sources: EveryMac, Wikipedia, Apple

MacBook Pro 15-inch (Core 2 Duo, 2.4 GHz, early 2008)

This MacBook Pro 15-inch laptop was released in early 2008 with an identical case design as its predecessor. It shipped with a 2.4 GHz Core 2 Duo (Penryn) processor and 2 GB of 667 MHz SDRAM. It contained a 200 GB hard drive and 8X DVD RW/CD-RW SuperDrive. The display was an LED-backlit 15.4-inch widescreen at 1440×900 resolution.

Although the external case did not change from the “Santa Rosa” processor version of the laptop that preceded it, the keyboard design removed the numeric keypad accessed using the fn (function) key and replaced the right-side enter key with an additional option key, the same laptop keyboard layout still in use now (as of February 2020). This MacBook Pro also used the same trackpad design as the MacBook Air of the time, adding multi-touch gestures.

Ports on this MacBook Pro included an ExpressCard slot, Gigabit Ethernet, FireWire 400, Firewire 800, two USB 2.0 ports, optical digital audio in/out, and DVI out. Wireless connections included AirPort Extreme (802.11a/b/g/n) and Bluetooth 2.1. It also included an iSight video camera and MagSafe power connector, both standard at the time.

When I acquired this laptop, its battery had burst while installed in the laptop. The battery failure caused the battery to bow in the center and it was lodged in the case. Using a few iFixIt spatula tools, I was able to extract it safely and then properly dispose of the ruptured battery.

Source: EveryMac

iBook G4 (Mid-2005, 2005)

The iBook G4 (Mid-2005) featured a 1.33 GHz PowerPC G4 processor, 512 MB of RAM, a 40 GB Ultra ATA/100 hard drive, a slot-loading DVD-ROM/CD-RW Combo drive, and standard AirPort Extreme (802.11g)/Bluetooth 2.0. The screen was a 12.1-inch TFT XGA active matrix display at 1024×768. The case was opaque white, rather than the translucent white used in earlier iBook models. 

This iBook model added a Sudden Motion Sensor and scrolling trackpad. The Sudden Motion Sensor stopped the hard drive from spinning if the iBook was dropped, thus minimizing damage and potential data loss. This was the first consumer-level Apple laptop to gain scrolling trackpad features, allowing users to use two-finger scrolling and two-fingering panning (a feature first introduced in PowerBook G4 laptops).

This and other iBook models were used extensively in the schools where I served as Technology Director among teachers and students. At the time, 1:1 laptop programs had just been adopted in a few school districts (where every student is issued a laptop for learning throughout the school day). At the time of the iBook G4, only one public school district in Chicago’s North Shore had adopted a 1:1 program for students, while most school districts had begun to issue laptops to staff and administrators.

References: EveryMac.com

iMac G5 2.0 20-inch (2005)

The iMac G5 featured a 2.0 GHz PowerPC 970 (G5) processor, 512 MB of 400 MHz PC3200 DDR SDRAM, a 250 GB (7200 RPM) Serial ATA hard drive, a vertically-mounted slot-loading 8X DVD-R/CD-RW SuperDrive, and built-in stereo speakers at the bottom of the display. The screen was a 20-inch TFT Active Matrix LCD at 1680×1050. Wired ports included FireWire 400 and USB 2.0. Wireless connections included AirPort Extreme (802.11g) and Bluetooth 2.0+EDR.

Like its predecessors, the iMac G5 rested on an aluminum stand with an adjustable hinge. It also supported the VESA (Video Electronics Standards Association) mounting interface standard which allowed the iMac to be mounted directly on a kiosk, wall, or arm. The iMac G5 also had an Ambient Light Sensor under the edge of the display that dims the sleep indicator light when the room is dark.

Source: EveryMac.com

iMac Core 2 Duo 2.0 17-inch (2006)

The iMac Core 2 Duo 2.0 was the second iMac design to use a flat-panel display. It featured a 2.0 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo processor (T7200) (with two independent processor cores on a single chip), 1 GB of RAM (667 MHz DDR2 SDRAM, PC2-5300), a 160 GB (7200 RPM) Serial ATA hard drive, a vertically-mounted slot-loading DVD+R DL SuperDrive, a built-in iSight video camera, and built-in stereo speakers. The flat panel display was a 17-inch TFT Active Matrix LCD at 1440×900 pixels.

Ports on this iMac included three USB 2.0 ports, two FireWire 400 ports, Gigabit Ethernet, and mini-DVI supporting an external display in extended desktop mode (rather than only supporting mirrored mode). This iMac also included built-in AirPort Extreme support.

Source: EveryMac.com

iMac G4/1.25 20-inch (2003)

The iMac G4/1.25 20-inch Flat Panel featured a 1.25 GHz PowerPC 7445 (G4) processor, 256 MB of RAM (333 MHz PC2700 DDR SDRAM), an 80.0 GB Ultra ATA/100 hard drive (7200 RPM), a tray-loading 4X SuperDrive, support for AirPort Extreme (802.11g)/Bluetooth with optional cards, and a 20-inch TFT Active Matrix LCD display at 1680×1050.

The internal components of this iMac are contained in a 10.6-inch half-sphere. Protruding from the top of the half sphere was a chrome stainless steel neck supporting the display. This design is sometimes referred to as the “sunflower iMac.” In addition to the polished stainless steel, the case and display are “ice white.” It shipped with two clear spherical external Apple Pro Speakers.

This iMac shipped with MacOS X 10.3 Panther and cannot boot into “Classic Mode” (MacOS 9).

Source: EveryMac.com

PowerBook G4 1.33 12-inch (2004)

The PowerBook G4 12-inch featured a 1.33 GHz PowerPC 7447a (G4) processor, 256 MB of DDR SDRAM, a 60 GB Ultra ATA/100 hard drive (4200 RPM), a slot-loading 8X Combo drive or a 4X SuperDrive, and Bluetooth 1.1/AirPort Extreme (802.11g). The case was made of an aluminum alloy. The 12.1-inch TFT XGA display was 1024×768 pixels. The small size offered considerable computing power in a highly mobile package.

The PowerBook G4 1.33 was similar to its predecessor (PowerBook G4/1.0 12-inch), but had a new logic board design and faster performance.

Source: EveryMac.com