iPad 10W USB Power Adapter (unopened, 2011)

This iPad 10W USB Power Adapter is compatible with iPad, iPhone, iPod touch, and iPod nano devices with a 30-pin connector. The part number is MC359LL/A.

The box contains three parts, a 30-pin to USB cable, a power “brick,” and a removable 2-prong US power plug. This example is unopened in its original packaging.

30-pin Digital AV Adapter (unopened, 2012)

This adapter allows an iPad with the original 30-pin connector to be connected to an HDMI display and simultaneously charged. It is compatible with any iPad with a 30-pin connector, iPhone 4 (or later with a 30-pin connector), and iPod touch Generation 4 (or later with a 30-pin connector). Mirroring is supported only by iPad 2 (or later with a 30-pin connector) and iPhone 4s (or later with a 30-pin connector).

From my experience, the ability of an iPad to be mirrored on an HDMI screen is frequently misunderstood. Because an iPad screen is in the 4:3 aspect raitio, when it is mirrored on an HD display (16:9 aspect ratio or other wide format), some users are surprised that the entire external display is not “filled.” I have never been able to understand what the user is expecting—a ridiculously stretched version of the iPad display; a “zoomed” version of the iPad display with the top and bottom cut off; or that somehow the iPad will magically rearrange itself to fill a widescreen display, thus making it a completely new display and, therefore, not mirrored. Instead, the iPad works as expected and appears centered in the middle of a larger display with black bars on both sides (this is called “letterboxing”). If a user launches an app that uses the full screen, such as a presentation designed in HD format or an HD movie, the iPad fills the entire screen.

This 30-pin Digital AV Adapter is unopened in its original, somewhat beat up, packaging.

iPad Camera Connection Kit (2010)

According to Apple, the Apple iPad Camera Connection Kit supports “standard photo formats, including JPEG and RAW, along with SD and HD video formats, including H.264 and MPEG-4.” This connection kit is compatible with iPad Generations 1 –3 (using the 30-pin connector).

The kit consists of two adapters, the Camera Connector USB interface (plug it into the dock connector port on your iPad, then attach your digital camera or iPhone using a USB cable); and the SD Card Reader (import photos and videos directly from your camera’s SD card, connect it to your iPad, then insert your digital camera’s SD card into the slot).

I have both adapters and the original packaging in my collection.

Source: Apple (Australia), Wikipedia

iPod classic (Generation 7, 120 GB, silver, 2008)

This Late 2018 iPod classic was very similar to the previous Generation 6 model. This iPod was available in 120 GB or 160 GB capacities, had a 2.5-inch color LCD display (320×240, 163 ppi), and was available with a black or silver anodized aluminum front and a chrome stainless steel back. This model is the third generation of the iPod classic.

The software included a Cover Flow option for selecting albums with three games bundled, including iQuiz, Klondike, and Vortex.

Source: EveryMac.com

Nike+iPod Sport Kit (2006)

The Nike+iPod Sport Kit was announced on May 23, 2006. A press released stated, “Nike and Apple today announced a partnership bringing the worlds of sports and music together like never before with the launch of innovative Nike+iPod products.” The two-piece wireless system included an oval sensor that was placed inside a Nike+ shoe and a 30-pin plug for the iPod nano.

Software on the iPod nano would connect to custom Nike+ footwear or any shoe with the Nike+iPod sensor attached and provided information on time, distance, calories burned, and pace on the iPod screen. In addition, “A new Nike Sport Music section on the iTunes Music Store and a new nikeplus.com personal service site help maximize the Nike+iPod experience.”

This kit was sold for $29 and included an in-shoe sensor and a receiver that attached to iPod. I used this device with both an iPod nano and with the first two iPhone models both on a treadmill and during my walks and run/walks. I attached the device to my running shoe laces with a purpose-built case that held the oval sensor. A later pair of shoes had a built-in slot in the arch of the sole that held the sensor.

Source: Apple.com

Composite AV Cable (unopened, 2010)

The Composite AV Cable allowed the connection of iPod, iPhone, or iPad to a television or stereo system. It allowed movies and videos to be viewed along with stereo sound from a device with a 30-pin connector. This cable did not allow the display to be  mirrored.

According to Apple.com, “The Composite AV Cable connects to your device or Universal Dock via the 30-pin dock connector and to your TV, home cinema receiver or stereo receiver via the composite video and red/white analogue audio ports. The cable also features a USB connector that you can plug in to a power source.”

This cable is unopened in a white box. It was later repackaged in a black box.

Reference: Apple.com, Wikipedia.org

iPod Dock (2003)

When the iPod switched its connector from a FireWire port to the proprietary 30-pin Dock Connector, several new compatibility and hardware features became available. Because the Dock Connector handled data, sound, and charging capabilities, a variety of connection options were available. 

The iPod Dock allowed a connected iPod to simultaneously charge, send sound to an external stereo system through a line-out port in the back, and respond to commands from an Apple Remote control device.

Source: Apple-History.com

iPad (original, 3G, 16 GB, 2010) and iPad Keyboard Dock

In a January 27, 2010 press release issued by Apple, the company announced the iPad and described it as, “a revolutionary device for browsing the web, reading and sending email, enjoying photos, watching videos, listening to music, playing games, reading e-books and much more.” It was described by Steve Jobs as, “a magical and revolutionary device at an unbelievable price” that “defines an entirely new category of devices that will connect users with their apps and content in a much more intimate, intuitive and fun way than ever before.”

At the time of its release, the iPad could run the 140,000 apps on the App Store and iTunes content including 11 million songs, 50,000 TV episodes, and over 8,000 films. Apple had also recently announced the iBookstore (now called Apple Books) and a new version of iWork for iPad (including Pages, Keynote, and Numbers).

The original iPad used a 9.7-inch multitouch display (1024×768 at 132 ppi) and ran the same operating system as iPhone, which at the time was referred to as iPhone OS 3.2.

Internally, the original iPad had a 1 GHz Apple A4 processor; 16, 32, or 64 GB of storage; 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi; an accelerometer; an ambient light sensor; a digital compass; GPS; two mono speakers; and a built-in microphone. The iPad was 0.5 inches thick and weighed 1.6 pounds.

This iPad model also had 3G wireless data support. The Wi-Fi version of the iPad was released in March 2010, and this 3G wireless data version was released a month later in April 2010.

The keyboard on the iPad Keyboard Dock measures 11 inches wide, 4.5 inches deep, and stands 0.65 inch tall toward the back, sloping to 0.25 inch at the spacebar. A white plastic dock is fused to the back of the keyboard making the device a total depth of 7.25 inches and 2 inches tall. The dock weighs 1.4 pounds.

Although the keyboard resembles the Mac keyboards of the time, the escape and function buttons found at the top of a Mac keyboard were replaced with 13 keys that control iPad-specific features, including: home screen, search, brightness, picture frame, onscreen keyboard toggle, music track control, volume, and screen lock. Each function is represented by an icon.

Sources: EveryMac.com, Apple.com, Cnet.com

iPad (Generation 3, cellular, 32 GB, white, 2012) with iPad Smart Case (green)

The iPad Generation 3 was significantly more powerful than the two previous iPad models and introduced the “Retina” display, a 9.7-inch multitouch screen at 2048×1536 (264 ppi). Internally it used a dual-core 1 GHz Apple A5X processor with quad core graphics; 1 GB of RAM; 16, 32, or 64 GB of storage; a rear-mounted 5 megapixel iSight camera (1080p); a front-mounted FaceTime camera; 802.11n Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth 4.0.

This specific iPad model supported 4G LTE connectivity on Verizon’s network in the US.

According to Cult of Mac, the iPad Generation 3 had the “shortest lifespan of any iPad in history. Apple debuted the fourth-gen model just 221 days after the iPad 3 went on sale. The iPad 4 added the Lightning connector, making the iPad 3 the last iPad to support the old 30-pin dock connector.”

The Smart Case for was made of polyurethane and fit several iPad models including iPad 2 (2nd generation), iPad (3rd generation), and iPad with retina display. The Smart Case offered full protection and the cover was magnetic so when the case was open the iPad woke up and automatically went to sleep when closed.

The interior of the case was made of a soft, color-matched microfiber lining that helped keep the display clean. By folding the cover into a triangle, Apple advertised the case positions as a “FaceTime and movie stand” while upright and a keyboard stand to “tilt iPad into a comfortable typing position” when flat.

Sources: EveryMac.com, Cult of Mac

iPad (Generation 3, Wi-Fi, 16 GB, black, 2012, unopened)

The iPad Generation 3 was significantly more powerful than the two previous iPad models and introduced the “Retina” display, a 9.7-inch multitouch screen at 2048×1536 (264 ppi). Internally it used a dual-core 1 GHz Apple A5X processor with quad core graphics; 1 GB of RAM; 16, 32, or 64 GB of storage; a rear-mounted 5 megapixel iSight camera (1080p); a front-mounted FaceTime camera; 802.11n Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth 4.0.

In my experience as a school Technology Director, the iPad Generation 3 began a shift in thinking that the iPad was not just a content-consumption device, but also a content-creation device. The iPad Generation 3 built upon the iWork apps introduced with he original iPad and camera introduced with the iPad Generation 2 by adding a considerably faster processor and better screen. Soon after the release of the iPad Generation 3, many schools began implementing multiple iPad devices eventually leading to 1:1 initiatives where each student is issued an iPad for learning.

According to Cult of Mac, the iPad Generation 3 had the “shortest lifespan of any iPad in history. Apple debuted the fourth-gen model just 221 days after the iPad 3 went on sale. The iPad 4 added the Lightning connector, making the iPad 3 the last iPad to support the old 30-pin dock connector.”

Source: EveryMac.com, Cult of Mac