Mac OS X Server box (unopened, 2001)

This version of Mac OS X Server, Mac OS X Server 10.1, was code named “Puma” and was released on September 25, 2001, just four months after Mac OS X Server 10.0.

This version and its predecessor (v.10.0 “Cheetah”) of Mac OS X Server replaced Mac OS X Server 1.0 and added all the features of Mac OS X to the server product, beginning with the new Aqua user interface. Other significant additions included Apache, PHP, MySQL, Tomcat, WebDAV support, and Macintosh Manager 2.

File services included:

  • Macintosh (AFP over TCP/IP)
  • Windows (Samba; SMB/CIFS)
  • Internet (FTP)
  • UNIX and Linux (NFS)

Internet and web services included:

  • Apache web server
  • QuickTime Streaming Server
  • WebObjects 5 Deployment
  • Mail (SMTP, POP, IMAP)
  • WebDAV
  • SSL
  • PHP
  • MySQL
  • JavaServer pages
  • Java Servelets
  • Caching web proxy

This box is shrink-wrapped and has never been opened. It contains:

  • Mac OS X Server CD (v10.1)
  • Macintosh Manager 2 CD
  • NetBoot CD
  • WebObjects 5 Deployment CD
  • Developer Tools CD
  • Installation Guide and electronic documentation

Source: Wikipedia

Mac OS X box (2001)

This Mac OS X box is the original retail box for the Mac OS X v10.0 operating system. Somewhat ironically, it shipped with a Mac OS 9 CD.

The box lists the Mac OS X Core technologies as:

  • Aqua
  • Darwin
  • Quartz
  • OpenGL 3D
  • QuickTime 5
  • Classic
  • Carbon and Cocoa
  • Java 2 Standard Edition
  • Apple Type Services
  • AppleScript
  • ColorSync
  • Unicode
  • BSD networking

The inside flap of the box offers a less technical version of Mac OS X’s features: “The super-modern operating system that delivers the power of UNIX with the legendary simplicity and elegance of the Macintosh.”

The four key technologies discussed include:

  • Unprecedented Stability and Performance
  • Designed for the Internet Age
  • Killer Graphics
  • Easy Transition

Source: Wikipedia

Apple CD media (2001)

My collection of Apple CD and DVD media includes operating systems, applications, software collections that shipped with devices, promotional media, diagnostic tools, and educational content. In general, Apple-branded CD or DVD examples in original packaging have been presented separately, while single discs or collections of discs are presented chronologically.

Apple CDs from 2001 include:

  • Software Bundle (600-9207-A, PowerBook G4 Media, 2001)
  • PowerBook G4 Software Restore 1 of 3 (Mac OS versions 9.1, 10.0.3; CD version 1.0; 691-3079-A, 2001)
  • PowerBook G4 Software Install (SSW version 9.1, CD version 1.2, 691-2957-A, 2001)
  • Mac OS X (Version 10.0, 1Z691-2974-A, 2001)
  • Mac OS X (Version 10.0.3, 1Z691-3064-A, 2001)
  • Mac OS X Upgrade CD (Version 10.1, 1Z691-3184-A, 2001)
  • Mac OS X Developer Tools (691-2963-A, 2001)
  • iMovie 2 Built for Mac OS X (Version 2.1, 691-3021-A, 2001)
  • iTunes (Version 1.0, 691-2900-A, 2001)
  • AppleWorks for Mac Seed 1/2/2001 (Version 6.0.5d11 xxx.xx, 2001)
  • Mac OS 9 (Version 9.2.1, 691-3334-A, 2001)

Apple shipped CD bundles in cardboard envelope packages in 2001. Since each computer required a different number of CDs, various envelope sizes were used to accommodate the number of CDs. A white envelope with a graphite Apple logo was used in this software bundle example.

Apple blank DVD media (2001)

In the early 2000s when Apple began offering a re-writable CD/DVD drive as an option, they included your first blank DVD-R disc along with your Mac purchase. Apple took the opportunity to fully brand the disc with printed packaging and a custom-printed DVD-R.

I have two unused examples of this official Apple blank media, one with a grape (purple) logo “Certified for use with Power Mac G4 DVD-R drives” (part number 603-047-A, unopened in shrink wrap) and another with a blueberry (bright blue) logo “Certified for use with Apple DVD-R drives” (part number 600-8671).

Apple Lockable Cable Fastener (unopened, 2001)

The Apple Lockable Cable Fastener is a metal clip with a hole meant to function as a security device. To use the fastener, several cables would be bundled in the clip and a padlock would be fed through the holes so the device cables and devices (mouse, keyboard, speakers, etc.) could not be easily removed and stolen.

One illustration on the manual shows an Apple Pro Keyboard, Apple Pro Mouse, and the speakers that shipped with the G4 Cube (2001). Thus, this Lockable Cable Fastener likely shipped with a G4 Cube.

Source: Apple

iPod Remote (for original iPod, 2001)

According to the iPod User’s Guide (for the original iPod), “The iPod Remote is included with some models of iPod and can be purchased separately.”

The iPod Remote includes a “rocker”-style (side-by-side) button for volume up/down, a play/pause button, a forward button, and a back button. The iPod Remote also includes a clip (to attach the remote to clothing), and Hold slider on the side.

The iPod User’s Guide explains its use: “To use the iPod Remote, connect it to iPod’s headphones port, then connect the Apple Earphones (or another set of headphones) to the remote. Use the remote to adjust volume, play or pause a song, fast-forward and rewind, and skip to the next or previous song. Set the remote’s Hold switch to disable the remote’s buttons.”

Source: Apple

iBook G3/500 (Dual USB, 2001)

The iBook G3/500 featured a 500 MHz PowerPC 750cx (G3) processor; 64 MB or 128 MB of RAM; a 10.0 GB Ultra ATA hard drive; a tray-loading CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, CD-RW, or DVD-ROM/CD-RW Combo drive; and optional AirPort (802.11b) card. The screen was a 12.1-inch TFT XGA active matrix display (1024×768). The case of the laptop was translucent white (a similar later model used an opaque white case).

This iBook replaced the previous iBook models that were much larger and came in one of five colors (including blueberry, tangerine, graphite, indigo, and key lime).

EveryMac.com reports that four versions of this laptop were available: 64 MB RAM with CD-ROM drive ($1299); 128 MB RAM with DVD-ROM drive ($1499), 128 MB RAM with CD-RW drive ($1599); and 128 MB RAM with DVD-ROM/CD-RW Combo drive (build-to-order direct from Apple, $1799).

Source: EveryMac.com

Pro Speakers (2001)

Apple Pro Speakers were introduced with the Power Mac G4 (Digital Audio) and later shipped with the iMac G4. These speakers required a Mac with a built-in amplifier and a proprietary audio jack to connect.

Apple described these speakers as “designed by Harman/Kardon,” once a high-end audio company now owned by Samsung. Harman/Kardon also designed the popular iSub subwoofer and SoundSticks in partnership with Apple that were released in 2000. In both the Apple Pro Speakers and SoundSticks, Apple contributed the industrial design and mechanical engineering, while Harman/Kardon manufactured the audio components of the product.

Sources: MacWorld, Wikipedia.org

iMac G3/600 (Summer 2001, snow)

The iMac G3/600 (Summer 2001) featured a 600 MHz PowerPC 750cx (G3) processor, 256 MB of RAM, a 40.0 GB Ultra ATA hard drive, a slot loading 8X/4X/24X CD-RW drive, a Harmon-Kardon designed sound system, and two FireWire 400 ports. This model was available in graphite or snow. Its screen was a 15-inch CRT display.

This iMac model represented a major default operating system switch for Apple. As of January 7, 2002, this iMac shipped with MacOS X 10.2 as the default operating system along with MacOS 9 pre-installed.

The color of this iMac is “snow.” At the time, other iMac colors were transparent, but Apple’s version of “snow” is opaque white.

Source: EveryMac.com