Macintosh Promo CD Fall 93 (unopened, 1993)

This unopened Macintosh Promo CD from Fall 1993 is unopened in its orignal shrink wrap. It promises “a way-cool experience for the eyes, ears, and mind.”

Although the CD is unopened, the back reveals that it contains music videos and audio tracks from Capitol Records, a “10 X 10” video from Tommy Boy Records, a “Mindstream” audio track from Mute Records, a “Sound” audio track from American Empire Records, and animation clips from Texas A&M.

Macintosh Garden indicates that this was a “Promotional CD distributed by Apple bundled with some AppleCD 300 and 300i drives.”

Source: Macintosh Garden

PowerBook 180c (1993)

The Macintosh PowerBook 180c included a 33 MHz 68030 processor, 4 MB of RAM, either an 80 MB or 160 MB hard drive, and an internal 1.44 MB floppy drive. The “c” in the name indicated that it had an 8.4-inch color active-matrix display capable of displaying 256 colors at 640×480 resolution. This was the first color PowerBook to display a full 640×480 display (previous models displayed 640×400). Due to the upgraded color, the case lid was redesigned (from the PowerBook 180) to accommodate the thicker display.

Aside from the display difference, the PowerBook 180c is nearly identical to the PowerBook 180. The 180c used a trackball and had two rotating feet in the back corners to elevate the keyboard to an angle.

An Apple Developer Note document indicates that the PowerBook 180c and 165c are closely related: “Because the Macintosh PowerBook 180c is identical in most respects to the PowerBook 165c computer, most hardware and software designed for that model will operate without modification on the PowerBook 180c.”

Due to its processing performance and because the PowerBook 180c (and 180) had an external color video port with similar specifications to desktop Macintosh models of the time (e.g., LC III+), it could be connected to an external monitor and replace a desktop computer.

Source: EveryMac, Wikipedia

Newton MessagePad 100 (1993)

The Apple Newton MessagePad 100 was the same as the original Newton, but shipped with a newer version of the Newton operating system (Newton OS 1.2). All available Newton models included the MessagePad (Original MessagePad, OMP), followed by the MessagePad 100, 110, 120, 130, 2000, and 2100. In addition, the eMate 300 also ran the Newton OS.

The Newton MessagePad was the first device referred to as a “Personal Digital Assistant” (PDA). The MessagePad 100 was a handheld device with a 336×240 monochrome display that was touch-sensitive. Users could interact with the display with a stylus that came with the Newton stored in a compartment on the right side. The device used a 20 MHz ARM (Acorn RISC Machine) 610 processor and had a total of 604k of storage, although only 150k was usable. This Newton weighed just under 1 pound at 0.9 pounds.

The Newton MessagePad 100 could be plugged in to a Macintosh or Windows computer using a serial port connection, or data could be “beamed” to and from the device through infrared. It also had a PCMCIA card slot (later called a PC Card) accessed from the top to allow other programs to be run or the memory to be expanded.

The Newton was also among the first devices commercially available to use handwriting recognition as part of the operating system. However, this feature did not work well when first released, leading media and popular culture to ridicule and parody the feature. The Newton’s handwriting capabilities were featured on an episode of The Simpsons (“Lisa on Ice”) and in a week-long story of the Doonesbury comic strip by Garry Trudeau.

When Steve Jobs returned to Apple in 1998, the Newton was one of the projects that was cancelled.

I used this Newton MessagePad 100 for 3 years while serving as a band director. This device allowed me to keep all my notes and contacts and I used it along with my Macintosh PowerBook 160. For the record, I did not experience the handwriting recognition issues with this device that were popular to reference at the time. In fact, I believe the Newton OS 1.2 handwriting recognition from around 1995 has the same, or better, accuracy than the “Scribble” text input on the Apple Watch in 2020.

Sources: EveryMac, Wikipedia

Apple Adjustable Keyboard (1993)

The Apple Adjustable Keyboard is Apple’s only ergonomic adjustable keyboard. This keyboard was released in 1993 and used the then-standard ADB (Apple Desktop Bus) port to connect to Macintosh computers. The QWERTY keyboard is split down the center between the 5/6, T/Y, G/H, and B/N keys, while a large space bar remains fixed in the center. The keyboard can be split up to 30 degrees, and palm rests are included to support the wrists while typing.

The keyboard shipped with a separate, ADB-connected numeric keypad, also with a palm rest. The keyboard and numeric keypad each have feet to raise the keyboard to a steeper angle.

The purpose of this ergonomic design was to resolve repetitive stress injuries that could lead to carpal tunnel syndrome. The primary problem with this keyboard is the vast amount of desk space that is required to use it.

The Keyboard packaging provides the following information:

The Apple Adjustable Keyboard has been ergonomically designed to make typing more comfortable. Its features include:

  • A split alphanumeric section that can be adjusted from a standard typewriter-style configuration to an open-angle configuration.
  • An adjustable keyboard slope and optional palm rests (included), which help your forearms and hands assume a neutral, more comfortable position.
  • A separate extended keypad (included in this package) with 15 function keys, 6 special keys, 4 cursor-control keys in a standard inverted-T layout, and an 18-key numeric keypad.

Please read the manual that comes with this keyboard to find out how to best use this product. Be sure to read the “Health Concerns Associated with Computer Use” section.
This keyboard is compatible with all Macintosh computers equipped with an Apple Desktop Bus connector and system software version 6.0.7 or later.

The keyboard uses two types of switches/buttons: ALPS SKFS switches for the keyboard keys (providing “clicky” tactile feedback) and recessed buttons for the function keys, volume, power, and other non-typing controls.

I have two of these keyboards in my collection. One includes the original box.

Source: Wikipedia

AppleDesign Powered Speakers (1993)

According to the User’s Guide, “AppleDesign Powered Speakers are the first powered speakers designed by a computer company specifically for use with a personal computer.” The guide goes on to explain that the speakers provide CD-quality sound from both the CD-ROM drive and the computer at the same time. The setup includes both a main speaker and a “satellite speaker.”

The two speakers are meant to be connected by an included speaker wire. The main speaker includes a Subwoofer output jack that allows a non-Apple powered (2 volts peak to peak) subwoofer to be connected.

The maximum sound output is listed at 90 dB at 0.5 meters and 90 Hz. The dimensions are 9.25 x 4.5 x 4.25 inches.

These AppleDesign Powered Speakers represent the first in my full collection of all of Apple’s standalone powered speakers. These speakers were followed by the AppleDesign Powered Speakers II, the iPod Hi-Fi, and eventually the HomePod. The only Apple powered speakers I do not currently own are the rare black AppleDesign Powered Speakers II.

Source: MacintoshRepository.org

Newton Connection Kit for Macintosh (1993)

The Newton Connection Kit for Macintosh included Newton Connection software on two 3.5-inch floppy disks, a serial cable, and manuals. The kit connected a Newton personal digital assistant to a Macintosh computer and allowed the Newton to be synchronized with a Macintosh. Users could also transfer files, restore the Newton, and install software onto the Newton. A Newton Connection Kit for Windows was also available.

Source: Wikipedia.org

AppleDesign Powered Speakers II (1993)

The data sheet that Apple provided for the AppleDesign Powered Speakers II described them as “audiophile-quality…designed to work perfectly with virtually any personal computer, portable CD player or audio cassette player and with any television that supports sound output.” 

The design of the rear speaker leg allowed the speakers to be adjusted to various angles. The power and volume controls was located in the front of the right speaker and an included cable with 3.5 mm plugs that connected the two speakers. Volume and an external headphone port were also located on the front of the right speaker. A stereo audio input port was located on the rear of the right speaker.

The speakers delivered 90 dB at 0.5m at 200Hz. Each speaker measures 6.8 inches tall, 4.1 inches wide, and 3.9 inches deep. The speakers were available as a set and as a part of the Apple Multimedia Kit for Macintosh.

This AppleDesign Powered Speakers II model is beige and matches Apple desktop computers sold at the time. Another version, considered far more rare, was also available in black with silver metallic Apple logos.

Reference: Apple via picclick.com

Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) Mouse II (M2706, 1993)

The Apple Desktop Bus Mouse II transformed the angular blocky designs to a curved teardrop shape. This basic shape is still used in mouse designs today by Apple and others. This mouse was included with Macintosh computers from 1993–1998 when the original iMac was introduced.

The Apple Desktop Bus Mouse II matched the platinum gray color of Macintosh computers at the time. However, a black version of this mouse was included with the Macintosh TV and the Performa 5420 (sold only in Europe and Asia).

Four different variations of the Apple Desktop Bus II Mouse are in my collection. The three platinum gray color versions have different color trackballs, and one has no label (with the product numbers cast directly into the plastic). The fourth example is the black Apple Desktop Bus II Mouse included with the Macintosh TV.

Source: Wikipedia.com

Macintosh Color Classic (1993)

The Macintosh Color Classic was the last of the classic all-in-one Macintosh designs adding a color screen and fresh interpretation of the classic boxy design of its predecessors. At the same time, it shared similar design language as the Macintosh LC 520 and LC 575, but in a smaller form factor.

The Macintosh Color Classic featured a 10-inch Trinitron CRT display at 512×384 in 8-bit color. True to the classic design, it included a 1.44 MB auto-inject SuperDrive (floppy drive), but unlike the original Macintosh computers, the Color Classic housed an internal 40-160 MB hard drive.

The original price of the Macintosh Color Classic was $1,399.

Source: EveryMac.com