Beige Mousepad (c. 1985)

This early Apple mousepad matches the beige plastics of the original Macintosh used from 1984 to approximately 1990 (Apple changed the Macintosh to to Platinum in 1990). The mousepad measures 8.5 x 11 inches with rounded edges and is 3/16 inch (0.1875) thick. 

The mouse surface is a textured plastic that is showing some discoloring due to its age. It features a classic Apple multicolor logo in the lower-right corner. The bottom of the mousepad uses a rubber textured material.

Magic Mouse 2 (silver, 2019)

According to Apple:

The “Magic Mouse is wireless and rechargeable, with an optimized foot design that lets it glide smoothly across your desk. The Multi-Touch surface allows you to perform simple gestures such as swiping between web pages and scrolling through documents. The incredibly long-lasting internal battery will power your Magic Mouse for about a month or more between charges. It’s ready to go right out of the box and pairs automatically with your Mac, and it includes a woven USB-C to Lightning Cable that lets you pair and charge by connecting to a USB-C port on your Mac.”

Apple’s website referred to this product as the “Magic Mouse 2,” but as of August 2021, a search on apple.com returned “…the product you’re looking for is no longer available on apple.com.” Thus, Apple apparently renamed the product “Magic Mouse.”

This wireless Multi-Touch mouse was 0.85 inch high, 2.25 inches wide, 4.47 inches deep, and weighed 0.22 pound. It shipped with a Lightning to USB cable for charging. It required a Bluetooth-enabled Mac with OS X 10.11 or later, and also worked on an iPad with iPadOS 13.4 or later.

Source: Apple

Magic Mouse 2 (space gray, 2019)

According to Apple, the “Magic Mouse is wireless and rechargeable, with an optimized foot design that lets it glide smoothly across your desk. The Multi-Touch surface allows you to perform simple gestures such as swiping between web pages and scrolling through documents. The incredibly long-lasting internal battery will power your Magic Mouse for about a month or more between charges. It’s ready to go right out of the box and pairs automatically with your Mac, and it includes a woven USB-C to Lightning Cable that lets you pair and charge by connecting to a USB-C port on your Mac.”

Apple’s website referred to this product as the “Magic Mouse 2,” but as of August 2021, a search on apple.com returned “…the product you’re looking for is no longer available on apple.com.” Thus, Apple apparently renamed the product “Magic Mouse.”

This wireless Multi-Touch mouse was 0.85 inch high, 2.25 inches wide, 4.47 inches deep, and weighed 0.22 pound. It shipped with a Lightning to USB cable for charging. It required a Bluetooth-enabled Mac with OS X 10.11 or later, and also worked on an iPad with iPadOS 13.4 or later.

This Space Gray color was discontinued some time in Summer 2021.

Source: Apple

Macintosh Mouse (original, beige, 1984)

This original Macintosh Mouse, Model M0100, shipped with a Macintosh 512K. This mouse was compatible with the Apple Lisa and was the same mouse that shipped with the original Macintosh. 

The original Macintosh Mouse used a DE-9 connector and remained unchanged until 1987 when its color was altered to Platinium (with Smoke accents) to match the Macintosh Plus. Like all early Macintosh mouse designs, it used only one button to control the famously easy-to-use Macintosh operating systems of the time.

Source: Wikipedia

USB Mouse balls (OEM replacement, 1998)

The original Apple USB Mouse, model M4848, used a half-teal blue and half-white ball that matched the Bondi blue iMac. When new iMac colors were introduced (blueberry, strawberry, lime, tangerine, and grape) the teal and white ball continued to be used until it was replaced with a gray and white ball.

These teal and white USB Mouse balls are official replacement parts provided by Apple.

Magic Mouse 2 (A1657, 2015)

The Magic Mouse 2 is similar to its predecessor, but uses an internal rechargeable battery that is recharged using a Lightning port. The Magic Mouse 2 is designed with its charging connector on the bottom and cannot be used while charging.

The mouse is available in silver (silver aluminum base with a white surface) and space gray (dark gray aluminum base with a black surface).

Source: Wikipedia.com

Magic Mouse (original, A1296, 2009)

Apple released the multi-touch Magic Mouse in 2009. The top curved surface of the Magic Mouse is a touch-sensitive area that allows right-clicking, left-clicking, and two-finger scrolling. The top of the mouse is white and the base is silver aluminum. This mouse connects via Bluetooth and uses two included (non-rechargeable) AA batteries. 

Several gestures are supported by the Magic Mouse, including click, two-button click, 360°-scroll, screen zoom, screen pan, two-finger swipe, one-finger swipe, two-finger double tap, and one-finger double tap. This is Apple’s first muse to use laser-tracking.

Source: Wikipedia.com

Wireless Mighty Mouse (A1197, 2006)

The Wireless Mighty Mouse was a Bluetooth version of the (corded) Mighty Mouse that was released a year before it. The original Wireless Mighty Mouse used the same opaque white coloration as the corded Mighty Mouse.

The Mighty Mouse was the first Apple mouse to have multiple buttons. The buttons consisted of two touch-sensitive areas on the top of the mouse and two “squeeze areas” on the sides of the mouse. Because it had no physical buttons, the entire body of the mouse could be clicked. The top of the mouse also had a mini free-spinning track ball that allowed scrolling in any direction.

The Wireless Mighty Mouse makes a sound when the scroll ball is rolled that is produced by a tiny internal speaker in the mouse. The sound cannot be disabled by settings.

Source: Wikipedia.com

Mighty Mouse (A1152, 2005)

The Mighty Mouse was the first Apple mouse to have multiple buttons. The buttons consisted of two touch-sensitive areas on the top of the mouse and two “squeeze areas” on the sides of the mouse. Because it had no physical buttons, the entire body of the mouse could be clicked. The top of the mouse also had a mini free-spinning track ball that allowed scrolling in any direction.

The Mighty Mouse was opaque white with light gray touch-sensitive squeeze areas. The mini trackball on top was also light gray.

Mighty Mouse makes a sound when the scroll ball is rolled that is produced by a tiny internal speaker in the mouse. The sound cannot be disabled by settings.

In October 2009, Apple renamed the Mighty Mouse the “Apple Mouse” due to legal issues regarding the name. Although Apple had licensed the Mighty Mouse name from CBS (a cartoon character originating in 1942), another company had been selling a “mighty mouse” product before Apple. This is an example of Apple’s sometimes-confusing naming practices. in this case, Apple returned to using the name of a previous product (from 2003) that had a different design and different features.

Source: Wikipedia.com, arstechnica.com 

Apple Wireless Mouse (original, A1015, 2003)

Apple’s first cordless mouse was the Apple Wireless Mouse, a Bluetooth version of the white Apple Mouse. The Apple Wireless Mouse used Bluetooth 1.1 and shipped with two 2 AA lithium (non-rechargeable) batteries. This mouse had a power switch on the bottom that slid to protect the optical sensor when the mouse was not in use. 

Although based upon the Apple Mouse, the surface of the mouse was opaque white, rather than the transparent acrylic used in the wired version. Like the wired version of the mouse, the entire surface served as the clickable single button.

Source: Wikipedia.com