iBook G3/366 SE (graphite, 2000)

The iBook G3/366 Special Edition (SE) shares the same Apple model number as the original “clamshell” iBook, but has a few upgraded internal specifications. The iBook SE increased the processor power to 366 MHz and shipped with 64 MB of RAM and a 6.0 GB hard drive.

The SE was also offered in a more conservative case color that Apple referred to as “graphite and ice.”

Source: EveryMac.com

iBook G3/366 (indigo, 2000)

The iBook G3/366 is similar to the original iBook G3/300 in design, but adds two new colors, a single FireWire port, and several internal upgrades.

The iBook G3/366 featured a 366 MHz G3 processor, 64 MB RAM, a 10.0 GB hard drive, a 24X tray-loading CD-ROM drive, and a 12.1-inch display at 800×600. This example is in indigo, a color Apple selected likely due to the popularity of the indigo iMac at the time. It also introduced a new hybrid A/V port that allowed composite audio/video out capabilities using a proprietary cable.

I remember when this laptop was released and it quickly became my “go to” device for portable video creation in iMovie for its faster processor and FireWire capabilities. It was among the first consumer-level laptops that began to feel like it had similar capabilities to the desktops at the time.

Source: EveryMac.com

iBook G3/366 (key lime, 2000)

The iBook G3/366 is similar to the original iBook G3/300 in design, but adds two new colors, a single FireWire port, and several internal upgrades.

The iBook G3/366 featured a 366 MHz G3 processor, 64 MB RAM, a 10.0 GB hard drive, a 24X tray-loading CD-ROM drive, and a 12.1-inch display at 800×600. This iBook is in key lime, an extremely vibrant shade of neon green.

Source: EveryMac.com

iBook G3/300 (original, tangerine, 1999)

The iBook G3/300 was released as a relatively low-cost portable Mac for consumers. Its radical design was available in blueberry and tangerine, two of the five colors available for iMac at the time. The design is sometimes referred to as the “clamshell.”

The iBook shipped with 32 MB or 64 MB of RAM, a 3.2 GB or 6.0 GB hard drive, and a 12.1-inch TFT active matrix display at 800×600. The case featured a handle on the back that folded out when in use and sprang back into place.

Although portable Mac options were not new at the time with years of PowerBook models that preceded the iBook, Wi-Fi was still not common in 1999. The iBook was available with an optional AirPort wireless networking card. Many consumers who purchased an iBook also likely needed an AirPort Base Station to plug into their modem to set up their first home wireless network.

This example is a tangerine iBook, complete with an internal AirPort wireless networking card.

Source: EveryMac.com

iBook G3/300 (original, blueberry, 1999)

Following the success of the original iMac, the iBook G3/300 was released as portable Mac for consumers with a radical design. The original iBook was available in blueberry and tangerine, two of the five colors available for iMac at the time. The design is sometimes referred to as the “clamshell.”

The iBook shipped with 32 MB or 64 MB of RAM, a 3.2 GB or 6.0 GB hard drive, and a 12.1-inch TFT active matrix display at 800×600. The case featured a handle on the back that folded out when in use and sprang back into place.

Although portable Mac options were not new at the time with years of PowerBook models that preceded the iBook, Wi-Fi was still not common in 1999. The iBook was available with an optional AirPort wireless networking card. Many consumers who purchased an iBook also likely needed an AirPort Base Station to plug into their modem to set up their first home wireless network.

My first full-time technology director position in a school district is where I first encountered the iBook and AirPort Base Station. The Director of Special Education had purchased an iBook for each Special Education teacher to assist in supporting students with Individualized Educational Plans and deal with the extensive paperwork that is required. Although it is fairly commonplace now for teacher and students to have a technology device assigned to them, in 1999–2000 this practice was considered quite innovative.

This example is a blueberry iBook, complete with an internal AirPort wireless networking card. In my experience, schools in my area tended to purchase the blueberry iBook over the tangerine option.

Source: EveryMac.com

iMac G3/333 (blueberry, 1999)

After the original iMac which was available only in “Bondi” blue, a second and third generation of CRT iMac using the same basic design became available in five colors. While the original Bondi blue Mac was a greenish blue and named after a popular Australian surfing beach, the second and third generation were named for fruit colors: lime, strawberry, blueberry, grape, and tangerine. Although the colors were named for fruits, the shades were arguably unfruitlike. Like the original iMac, the case was translucent, rather than completely transparent.

This blueberry iMac example is a G3/333MHz model very similar to the 266 MHz “Revision B” iMac that preceded it in the same year (1999). This iMac G3/333 had a larger hard drive and lacked the “Mezzanine” port.

Also note that this iteration of iMac included a matching Apple USB Keyboard (M2452) and Apple USB Mouse (M4848). The mouse was often criticized for its circular, “hockey puck” shape with critics claiming it was difficult to locate the top button since the shape was a circle. In this revision, Apple added a dimple to the top of the mouse to help address this issue.

Source: EveryMac.com

MacBook (white, 2009)

Apple originally released the MacBook in 2006 as a followup to the iBook line of laptops. The MacBook was the first laptop to use the MagSafe connector, a power connector that attached to the laptop with a magnet that easily broke free to prevent the power cord from pulling the laptop off a table or a lap.

I own both a black and white version of the first-generation MacBook. White MacBook laptops have two finishes: the outer case is glossy and prone to light scratches; the inside is a flatter and has a less reflective white finish.

Source: EveryMac.

MacBook (black, 2008)

Apple originally released the MacBook in 2006 as a follow-up to various iBook laptop iterations. The MacBook was the first laptop to use the MagSafe connector, a power connector that attached to the laptop with a magnet that easily broke free to prevent the power cord from pulling the laptop off a table or a lap.

The first-generation MacBook was made of polycarbonate and was available in glossy white or matte black.

I own both a black and white version of the first-generation MacBook. To purchase it new, the black model was just over $100 more than the white version for no other reason than it came in black. At the time, all other Mac models were white or silver.

Source: EveryMac

eMac (2003)

The eMac was released in 2002 as the final CRT-based all-in-one Mac. It was manufactured for a relatively long time—just over 4 years—and was discontinued in 2006. Although the design is similar to the CRT iMac, it lacks a handle and was extremely difficult to move with a weight of 50 pounds. In addition, the screen size is larger than the original iMac and the eMac features a G4 processor, making it significantly faster.

The eMac was intended to be an education-only Mac, but its popularity, power, and lower price made it attractive to the consumer market. When the eMac was released, the second-generation iMac had just been introduced with a flat-panel display on an adjustable chrome arm. At the time, LCD screens were considerably more expensive than CRT screens so an eMac could be purchased for $999, while second-generation iMac cost $1,299.

The eMac in my collection was manufactured in 2003. Almost 10 years after I acquired my eMac, I was able to get an Apple eMac Tilt and Swivel Stand (M8784G/A). The stand is attached to the bottom of the eMac to both raise it to a more comfortable viewing height and allow it to easily tilt.

Information adapted from EveryMac.com.

Macintosh TV (1993)

I acquired my Macintosh TV in the early 2000s in an eBay purchase. This 1993 Macintosh is said to be among the most rare with sources reporting between 8,000 and 10,000 manufactured. The machine is based upon the Macintosh LC 520, but it came standard with a TV and FM tuner card with a remote control. The computer was Apple’s first computer to ship standard with a cable-ready (BNC port) television built in.

One of the rare elements about this computer is that it was all black, including the ADB mouse and keyboard, both the standard issue at the time of manufacture. At the time, all other Macintosh computers were beige.

The CD player uses a tray cartridge design. To insert a CD, you remove the tray, open the clear plastic tray lid, insert the CD, and then insert the tray cartridge into the CD slot. The CD slot is labeled “CD Caddy.”

When I did the photo shoot for my Macintosh TV, I noticed that rust had formed around the serial and printer ports in the back of the computer. I removed the back and slid out the motherboard to found that the internal battery had ruptured and corroded many of the surrounding parts. I cleaned the inside of the board and removed the battery. I also didn’t attempt to start the computer since several components on the board were affected.

Source: EveryMac.com.