iMac Core 2 Duo 2.0 17-inch (2006)

The iMac Core 2 Duo 2.0 was the second iMac design to use a flat-panel display. It featured a 2.0 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo processor (T7200) (with two independent processor cores on a single chip), 1 GB of RAM (667 MHz DDR2 SDRAM, PC2-5300), a 160 GB (7200 RPM) Serial ATA hard drive, a vertically-mounted slot-loading DVD+R DL SuperDrive, a built-in iSight video camera, and built-in stereo speakers. The flat panel display was a 17-inch TFT Active Matrix LCD at 1440×900 pixels.

Ports on this iMac included three USB 2.0 ports, two FireWire 400 ports, Gigabit Ethernet, and mini-DVI supporting an external display in extended desktop mode (rather than only supporting mirrored mode). This iMac also included built-in AirPort Extreme support.

Source: EveryMac.com

iMac G4/1.25 20-inch (2003)

The iMac G4/1.25 20-inch Flat Panel featured a 1.25 GHz PowerPC 7445 (G4) processor, 256 MB of RAM (333 MHz PC2700 DDR SDRAM), an 80.0 GB Ultra ATA/100 hard drive (7200 RPM), a tray-loading 4X SuperDrive, support for AirPort Extreme (802.11g)/Bluetooth with optional cards, and a 20-inch TFT Active Matrix LCD display at 1680×1050.

The internal components of this iMac are contained in a 10.6-inch half-sphere. Protruding from the top of the half sphere was a chrome stainless steel neck supporting the display. This design is sometimes referred to as the “sunflower iMac.” In addition to the polished stainless steel, the case and display are “ice white.” It shipped with two clear spherical external Apple Pro Speakers.

This iMac shipped with MacOS X 10.3 Panther and cannot boot into “Classic Mode” (MacOS 9).

Source: EveryMac.com

iMac G4/700 15-inch (flat panel, 2002)

The iMac G4/700 (Flat Panel) featured a 700 MHz PowerPC 7441 (G4) processor, 128 MB or 256 MB of RAM (PC133 SDRAM), a 40.0 GB Ultra ATA/66 hard drive (5400 RPM), either a tray-loading CD-RW drive or DVD-ROM/CD-RW Combo Drive, and a 15-inch TFT Active Matrix LCD display.

The internal components of this iMac are contained in a 10.6-inch half-sphere. Protruding from the top of the half sphere was a chrome stainless steel neck supporting the display. This design is sometimes referred to as the “sunflower iMac.” In addition to the polished stainless steel, the case and display are “ice white.” This iMac also included a matching ice white Apple Pro Keyboard and Mouse. The more expensive Combo Drive configuration of this iMac shipped with two clear spherical external Apple Pro Speakers.

This iMac shipped with MacOS X 10.1 and MacOS 9.2 installed with MacOS X selected as the default OS. 

Source: EveryMac.com

iMac (original, Bondi blue, 1998)

The original iMac was introduced on May 6, 1998, and shipped August 15, 1998. It featured a 233 MHz PowerPC 750 (G3) processor, 32 MB of RAM, a 4.0 GB EIDE hard drive, and a tray loading CD-ROM drive. Its screen was a 15-inch CRT display.

The original iMac was available in one color called “Bondi blue,” named for the blue-green color of the water at Bondi Beach near Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. “Bondi” is an [Australian] Aboriginal word meaning “water breaking over rocks.”

This was the first consumer computer product released after Steve Jobs returned to Apple as interim CEO. The iMac was primarily credited with returning Apple to profitability and re-establishing Apple’s commitment to simplicity and design, but at the time was criticized for dropping the floppy disk drive and adopting the emerging USB standard.

The “i” in “iMac” has been described by Apple to represent “Internet,” but Steve Jobs also specified the “i” to mean internet, individual, instruct, inform, and inspire in a presentation in 1998.

Although the original iMac was not meant to be user-upgradable, it did contain what was referred to at the time as a “mysterious” slot behind the hinged side door called the “Mezzanine” slot. Inside the iMac was a Mezzanine connector soldered on to the motherboard. Officially, Apple never explained its purpose, but a few developers created expansion products that used the slot and/or port. I installed one such port in a few iMac computers in 1999, namely the Griffin iPort that added an Apple serial port and video-out port. Although the Griffin iPort didn’t use the Mezzanine internal connector, it did use the Mezzanine slot to make the ports available.

The Revision A iMac (M6709LL/A) and Revision B iMac (M6709LL/B) are identical with the exception of graphics systems. Revision A (August 15, 1998) had an ATI Rage IIc graphics with 2 MB of VRAM, and Revision B (October 26, 1998) had an ATI Rage Pro Turbo graphics with 6 MB of VRAM.

Source: EveryMac.com, LowEndMac.com, Wikipedia, and Business Insider

iMac G3/500 DV SE (Summer 2000, graphite)

The iMac G3/500 DV Special Edition (Summer 2000) featured a 500 MHz PowerPC 750 (G3) processor, 128 MB of RAM, a 30.0 GB Ultra ATA hard drive, a slot loading 4X DVD-ROM drive, a Harmon-Kardon designed sound system, and two FireWire 400 ports. The screen was a 15-inch CRT display.

The iMac G3/500 DV Special Edition (Summer 2000) is similar to the iMac G3/450 DV+ (Summer 2000) released at the same time, but was offered in graphite and snow rather than indigo, ruby, and sage. It was referred to as a “Special Edition” model because it had a faster processor, twice the RAM, and a larger hard drive (30.0 GB instead of 20.0 GB).

This iMac model also replaced the Apple USB Keyboard and round Apple USB Mouse with the Apple Pro Keyboard and Mouse.

Source: EveryMac.com

iMac G3/333 (strawberry, 1999)

The iMac G3/333 featured a 333 MHz PowerPC 750 (G3) processor, 32 MB of RAM, and a 6.0 GB EIDE hard drive. The screen was a 15-inch CRT display.

This iMac was offered in five different colors: lime (lime green), strawberry (pinkish-red), blueberry (bright blue), grape (purple), and tangerine (orange-yellow). The previous version of this iMac was offered in the exact same colors.

Apart from the faster 333 MHz processor, this iMac was identical to the iMac G3/266 before it.

Source: EveryMac.com

iMac G3/266 (grape, 1999)

The iMac G3/266 featured a 266 MHz PowerPC 750 (G3) processor, 32 MB of RAM, and a 6.0 GB EIDE hard drive. Its screen was a 15-inch CRT display.

This iMac was offered in five different colors: lime (lime green), strawberry (pinkish-red), blueberry (bright blue), grape (purple), and tangerine (orange-yellow). Previously, the iMac was available only in Bondi blue (blue green).

This iMac is grape.

The iMac G3/266 models had similar specifications to the Revision B iMac line before, but shipped with a larger 6.0 GB hard drive and lacked the “Mezzanine” internal expansion slot and IrDA.

Source: EveryMac.com

iMac G3/600 (Summer 2001, snow)

The iMac G3/600 (Summer 2001) featured a 600 MHz PowerPC 750cx (G3) processor, 256 MB of RAM, a 40.0 GB Ultra ATA hard drive, a slot loading 8X/4X/24X CD-RW drive, a Harmon-Kardon designed sound system, and two FireWire 400 ports. This model was available in graphite or snow. Its screen was a 15-inch CRT display.

This iMac model represented a major default operating system switch for Apple. As of January 7, 2002, this iMac shipped with MacOS X 10.2 as the default operating system along with MacOS 9 pre-installed.

The color of this iMac is “snow.” At the time, other iMac colors were transparent, but Apple’s version of “snow” is opaque white.

Source: EveryMac.com

iMac G3/350 (Summer 2000, indigo)

The iMac G3/350 (Summer 2000, indigo) featured a 350 MHz PowerPC 750 (G3) processor, 64 MB of RAM, a 7.0 GB Ultra ATA hard drive, a slot loading 24X CD-ROM drive, and a Harmon-Kardon designed sound system. The all-in-one case design was transparent indigo blue with a 15-inch CRT display. 

This model does not support FireWire (400) or AirPort (802.11b), even though its predecessor added support for both technologies. However, this model included a slightly larger hard drive (7.0 GB compared to 6.0 GB), a slightly better video processor, and replaced the Apple USB Keyboard and round Apple USB Mouse with the Apple Pro Keyboard and Mouse. This model sold for $200 less than the previous model at $799.

Due to the price drop, this model was purchased for many schools to update the computer labs common at the time. In my Technology Director position at the time, we upgraded at least three computer labs from tray-loading iMac to slot-loading iMac computers due to the price drop.

Source: EveryMac.com

Macintosh (1984)

The original Macintosh was released in January 1984 as the “Apple Macintosh.” After November 1984 a 512K version was offered and the computers were referred to as the Macintosh 128K and Macintosh 512K. (Internally, the original Macintosh differed from the Macintosh 128K so they are technically two different computers.)

The original Macintosh had a distinctive beige case with a handle and a 9-inch monochrome screen. The selling price when released was $2,495.

The Macintosh was introduced to the American public by the iconic “1984” television commercial directed by Ridley Scott. The commercial aired on CBS during the third quarter of Super Bowl XVIII on January 22, 1984. The voiceover stated: “On January 24th, Apple Computer will introduce Macintosh. And you’ll see why 1984 won’t be like 1984.”

The Macintosh introduced several “firsts” in a relatively inexpensive consumer-level personal computer:

  • built-in 3.5-inch floppy disk drive
  • consistent user experience and user interface among applications
  • an all-in-one design (combining the CPU, monitor, and peripherals into a single unit)
  • graphical user interface controlled by the point-and-click features of an included mouse to access pull-down menus and click icons
  • WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) printing

Overall, the Macintosh allowed a user to focus on the work they were doing, rather than struggling to make the computer function. 

The original iMac included a Motorola 68000 microprocessor running at 7.8336 MHz, 128 KB RAM, a one-bit (black-and-white) 9-inch CRT with a resolution of 512×342, and a single 400 KB single-sided 3.5-inch floppy disk drive (with no internal storage).

The original Macintosh was floppy-disk-based. A “Startup Disk” on a single disk could be temporarily ejected as the computer was used to allow documents to be saved or to allow it to run another application stored on another disk. The computer’s operating system was named System 1.0 and consisted of System 0.97 and Finder 1.0. The highest-level OS that can be run on the original Macintosh was System 3.2 and Finder 5.3. The Macintosh shipped with the applications MacPaint and MacWrite.

The original Macintosh did not include a cooling fan, instead relying on convection cooling. The absence of the fan made the computer run quietly.

Inside the case, the original Macintosh was signed by the entire Macintosh Division at Apple (c. 1982). The signatures are molded on the internal plastic and include: Peggy Alexio, Colette Askeland, Bill Atkinson, Steve Balog, Bob Belleville, Mike Boich, Bill Bull, Matt Carter, Berry Cash, Debi Coleman, George Crow, Donn Denman, Christopher Espinosa, Bill Fernandez, Martin Haeberli, Andy Hertzfeld, Joanna Hoffman, Rod Holt, Bruce Horn, Hap Horn, Brian Howard, Steve Jobs, Larry Kenyon, Patti King, Daniel Kottke, Angeline Lo, Ivan Mach, Jerrold Manock, Mary Ellen McCammon, Vicki Milledge, Mike Murray, Ron Nicholson Jr., Terry Oyama, Benjamin Pang, Jef Raskin, Ed Riddle, Brian Robertson, Dave Roots, Patricia Sharp, Burrell Smith, Bryan Stearns, Lynn Takahashi, Guy “Bud” Tribble, Randy Wigginton, Linda Wilkin, Steve Wozniak, Pamela Wyman, and Laszlo Zidek.

Source: EveryMac.com, and Wikipedia (Macintosh) (1984 commercial)