Cloth (for iMac Core 2 Duo, 2007)

Beginning in the mid-2000s, some iMac models shipped with an “official” cleaning cloth that was referenced in the iMac manual:

“Cleaning Your iMac Display. Use the cloth that came with your iMac to clean the display… Dampen the cloth that came with your iMac, or another clean, soft, lint-free cloth, with water only and wipe the screen. Do not spray liquid directly on the screen.”

This version of the cleaning cloth is black microfiber with an Apple logo embossed in the center edge of one side. The packaging places the embossed Apple logo in the corner due to the manner in which the cloth is folded in its clear envelope-style package.

Source: Apple

Apple keyboard extension cable (2008)

Shortly after Apple began including USB keyboards with tower computers, they have included a USB extension cable in the box in the event the user wished to place the tower under a desk or otherwise far way from the keyboard. The extender is APple’s way of dealing with their notoriously short keyboard cables. The User’s Guide for the 2008 Mac Pro pictures this keyboard extension cable design and states: “If the keyboard cable isn’t long enough, use the keyboard extension cable that came with your Mac Pro.”

Apple has also followed a convention of placing a notch in their USB keyboard extenders. This notch matches a slot in the USB plug present in all Apple keyboards, thus allowing an Apple USB keyboard to be plugged into any standard USB port, but preventing the Apple keyboard extension cable to be used with anything except Apple USB keyboards with the slot in the USB plug.

Source: Apple

Apple Lockable Cable Fastener (unopened, 2001)

The Apple Lockable Cable Fastener is a metal clip with a hole meant to function as a security device. To use the fastener, several cables would be bundled in the clip and a padlock would be fed through the holes so the device cables and devices (mouse, keyboard, speakers, etc.) could not be easily removed and stolen.

One illustration on the manual shows an Apple Pro Keyboard, Apple Pro Mouse, and the speakers that shipped with the G4 Cube (2001). Thus, this Lockable Cable Fastener likely shipped with a G4 Cube.

Source: Apple

Mini-DVI to DVI Adapter (DVI-D) (M9321G/B, 2005)

Beginning in 2005, Apple released several computers with a Mini-DVI port, including the 12-inch PowerBook G4, Intel-based iMac, the MacBook Intel-based laptop, the Intel-based Xserve, the 2009 Mac mini, and some late model eMacs.

The port was only used until 2008 when it was replaced with the Mini DisplayPort. The port is used instead of a full-size DVI connector to save physical space while allowing the computer to be connected to a DVI-D display.

Sources: EveryMac, B&H Photo Video, Wikipedia

Apple DVI-D Male to DVI-D Female Cable Adapter (603-8471, 2006)

When the original Mac Pro was released in 2006, it included two side-by-side DVI-D connectors (Digital Visual Interface) on the back so two DVI displays could be connected at the same time.

Since the ports were close together, Apple shipped this DVI-D Male to DVI-D Female Cable Adapter in the event that the cable interface of the display was too wide to fit the connectors from both displays. The adapter’s function is to extend the port an extra six inches from the computer.

Sources: Apple (via B&H Photo Video), macofalltrades

MagSafe to MagSafe 2 Converter (2012)

According to Apple, the MagSafe to MagSafe 2 Converter allowed you to “use the MagSafe connector on your LED Cinema Display, Thunderbolt Display, or MagSafe Power Adapter to charge your MagSafe 2-equipped Mac computer.”

Essentially, this adapter helped to bridge the gap to allow original MagSafe power-equipped devices (2006–2012) to be used after Apple changed to a new MagSafe 2 (2012–2019) standard in 2012.

MagSafe was an Apple technology that allowed power cords (primarily on laptops, but also used on some displays) to provide power using a magnetically attached cord. The technology was extremely effective in preventing damage because if a user would, for example, trip over a laptop power cord or forget their device was plugged in, the magnet would pull out of the socket without damaging the device.

Devices that used this adapter included: 24-inch Apple LED Cinema Display, 27-inch Apple LED Cinema Display, Apple Thunderbolt Display, Apple 45W MagSafe Power Adapter, Apple 85W MagSafe Power Adapter, MacBook Pro with Retina display, and MacBook Air with MagSafe 2 power port.

Source: Wikipedia, Apple

DVI to VGA Adapter (2005)

Apple’s DVI to VGA Adapter shipped with the original Mac mini (2005). Because the original Mac mini Video out port was designed for displays that use a DVI connector, the computer also shipped with this compact DVI to VGA Adapter. This adapter allowed the Mac mini to work with a then-standard VGA display.

Source: Apple, EveryMac

PowerBook G3 (original, 250 MHz, “Kanga,” 1997)

The PowerBook G3/250 is the first Apple laptop to use the G3 processor. It shipped with a 250 MHz G3 processor; contained 32 MB RAM and 2 MB VRAM; used a 5 GB hard drive; and had an internal 20X tray-loading CD-ROM drive. It included “hot-swappable” drive bays—drives could be swapped while the computer was running without restarting—and dual PC card slots. The display was a 12.1-inch color TFT active-matrix display at 800×600 resolution.

The design of the original PowerBook G3 is nearly identical to the PowerBook 3400 that proceeded it. The laptop included the 3400’s notable four-speaker sound system. It shipped with MacOS 8.0 and could be updated to a maximum of MacOS 9.1. Its average weight was 7.5 pounds.

Because of its G3 (third-generation) PowerPC 750 processor that included a backside level 2 cache, the laptop’s performance exceeded that of some desktop systems at the time. When released, its retail price was $5,700.

Source: EveryMac

PowerBook 180c (1993)

The Macintosh PowerBook 180c included a 33 MHz 68030 processor, 4 MB of RAM, either an 80 MB or 160 MB hard drive, and an internal 1.44 MB floppy drive. The “c” in the name indicated that it had an 8.4-inch color active-matrix display capable of displaying 256 colors at 640×480 resolution. This was the first color PowerBook to display a full 640×480 display (previous models displayed 640×400). Due to the upgraded color, the case lid was redesigned (from the PowerBook 180) to accommodate the thicker display.

Aside from the display difference, the PowerBook 180c is nearly identical to the PowerBook 180. The 180c used a trackball and had two rotating feet in the back corners to elevate the keyboard to an angle.

An Apple Developer Note document indicates that the PowerBook 180c and 165c are closely related: “Because the Macintosh PowerBook 180c is identical in most respects to the PowerBook 165c computer, most hardware and software designed for that model will operate without modification on the PowerBook 180c.”

Due to its processing performance and because the PowerBook 180c (and 180) had an external color video port with similar specifications to desktop Macintosh models of the time (e.g., LC III+), it could be connected to an external monitor and replace a desktop computer.

Source: EveryMac, Wikipedia

PowerBook 5300cs (1995)

The Macintosh PowerBook 5300c/100 used a 100 MHz processor (PowerPC 603e), shipped with 8 MB or 16 MB of RAM, and included a 500 MB or 750 MB hard drive. The “cs” in the name indicated that its 10.4-inch color display displayed 8-bit color on its 640×480 display.

This was among the first Apple laptop series to use “hot swappable” drive bays (along with the PowerBook 190 from the same year), meaning that users could remove and replace the internal drives without restarting the computer.

This laptop shipped with Macintosh System 7.5.2 and could run operating systems up to Mac OS 9.1. The PowerBook 5300cs weighed 6.2 pounds.

Because this laptop was designed to be as small as possible at the time, it had insufficient internal space for an internal CD-ROM drive. Its design also replaced the rotating back feet of previous PowerBook models with spring-loaded feet that pop out to elevate the angle of the laptop. The case also used a darker shade of grey (almost black) than its predecessors.

PowerBook 5300 computers were infamous at the time for shipping with a few quality problems. Notably, the internal battery on two early models reportedly overheated and burst into flames, a design flaw that Apple corrected by switching from lithium ion to nickel metal hydride batteries. Apple reported that only a few hundred laptops shipped with the early battery and a free replacement was offered. Some users also experienced problems with the display hinges cracking over time and the internal connector ribbons wearing out, leading to screen failure (the screen would show vertical lines or go completely black).

The PowerBook 3400 replaced the 5300 and some of the 5300-series hot-swappable drive bay modules could be used with newer 3400 PowerBooks.

Source: EveryMac, Wikipedia