iPhone 6/6s Silicone Case [(PRODUCT)RED, 2014]

The iPhone 6 Silicone Case fit both the iPhone 6 and 6s, it featured contoured silicone buttons over the volume and Sleep/Wake buttons, and a microfiber lining.

This case was available in a variety of colors, including Mint, Lavender, Turquoise, Antique White, Roal Blue, Apricot, Light Pink, Midnight Blue, Charcoal Gray, Stone, Orange, Blue, Pink Sand, White, Yellow, and (PRODUCT)RED.

This example is in (PRODUCT)RED. As of 2020, Apple reports, “For 13 years, supporters of our partnership with (RED) have raised more than $220 million in funding for HIV/AIDS programs. Every (PRODUCT)RED purchase gets us closer to ending AIDS.”

Source: Apple

iPhone Bluetooth Headset cable (A1221, 2007)

The iPhone Bluetooth Headset cable is a unique 30-pin USB charging cable with an additional, offset magnetic charging port to accommodate the iPhone Bluetooth Headset. This allowed iPhone Bluetooth Headset users to charge both the original iPhone and the iPhone Bluetooth Headset from the same cable at the same time.

Source: Apple

iPhone Lightning Dock (black, 2015)

The iPhone Lightning Dock is a minimalist charging dock with a heavy base, protruding angled Lightning connector, and two ports on the back—a Lightning port and an audio jack to allow music to be played on a speaker or headphones.

The iPhone Lightning Dock has been available in several colors during its lifetime, including white, black, silver, space gray, rose gold, gold, and “new” gold (to match an updated gold iPhone color). This example is black.

Apple describes the dock: “You can use it to charge and sync any iPhone that has a Lightning connector. Your iPhone sits upright in the dock as it syncs or charges, so it’s ideal for a desk or countertop. Even when your iPhone is in an Apple-designed case, it’s easy to dock. And you can unlock iPhone or use Touch ID without having to remove it from the dock.”

Source: Apple

iPhone Bluetooth Headset (2007)

The iPhone Bluetooth Headset shipped along with the original iPhone in 2007. The design was minimalist and the device included just one button to accept/decline calls; place a call on hold/switch to a call on hold; and power the device on/off. Although the cost was relatively high at $129, the headset shipped with two additional charging methods, a dock for the iPhone and the iPhone Bluetooth Headset (with a connected USB cable); and an additional 30-pin travel cable that charged the iPhone and included an extra port to charge the iPhone Bluetooth Headset simultaneously.

Although the iPhone Bluetooth Headset had very good sound quality, it could not be used for any audio features other than phone calls—no voice dialing features or the ability to listen to iTunes or other iPhone audio was possible.

An AppleInsider review listed four “Pros:” Elegantly slim and very lightweight design; Comfortable to wear; Includes a dock and extra travel cable; Easy to set up and use. The same review included four “Cons:” Limited range and battery life; No fancy phone control features or redial; No iPhone audio support apart from phone calls; No voice dialing support.

Original iPhone owners, me included, purchased the original iPhone for $599, a price considered high at the time. About a month after the original iPhone’s release when the product was clearly becoming a success, Apple dropped the price by $99 and issued early iPhone purchasers a $99 Apple Store credit. I used this credit toward the purchase of this iPhone Bluetooth Headset.

Source: AppleInsider

iPhone 4 Bumper Case (orange, 2010)

The iPhone 4 Bumper Case was released in 2010 along with the iPhone 4. Unfortunately, this case was placed in the middle of a famous and rare Apple public relations issue, “Antennagate.” The design of this case is very simple, a plastic and rubber bumper that surrounds the outer edges of the iPhone 4 providing drop protection, a gripping-rubber lip that prevents the front and back of the iPhone 4 from making contact with a surface when placed flat, and a barrier that prevents holding the phone in a manner that may affect antenna performance.

MacWorld described the bumper case: “It consists of a stiff, plastic band that covers the entire metal edge of the iPhone 4, combined with relatively tough rubber around the front and rear edges to hold the Bumper in place.”

Antennagate was a name given by the media to a phenomenon that was reported soon after the iPhone 4 release on June 24, 2010, where the cell phone signal would drop if the phone was gripped in a way that covered the integrated antenna. Apple’s reaction was to hold a press conference 22 days after the iPhone release, hosted by Steve Jobs, who confirmed the iPhone 4 issue (and mentioned the same issue was present on competitor phones), presented several customer purchasing and phone performance statistics, and offered the black version of this case for free (or refunded previous bumper case purchases).

Apple offered this case in black, orange, blue, pink, green, white, dark gray, and later, (PRODUCT)RED.

Sources: MacWorld (case program, review), PCWorld, AppleInsider

iPhone 7 (128 GB, silver, 2016)

The iPhone 7 has a 4.7-inch screen at 1334×750, also known by Apple as a Retina HD display. The iPhone has a front and back camera: the rear camera is 12-megapixel and the front camera is a 7-megapixel FaceTime HD camera with 1080p video. 

The iPhone 7 was the first iPhone (along with the iPhone 7 Plus) to remove the 3.5 mm headphone jack and only include a Lightning port for audio. Like the iPhone 6 and 6s before it, the iPhone 7 uses a “clickless” Home button that clicks using an internal Taptic-engine-powered solid state component. Although the iPhone 7 is not water-proof, it is splash, water, and dust-resistant. 

The iPhone 7 came in several colors: silver (white glass front, silver back); gold (white glass front, gold back); rose gold (white glass front, pink-tinted gold back); black (black glass front, matte black back); jet black (black glass front, a high-gloss black anodized and polished black aluminum back); and later added a (PRODUCT)RED Special Edition (white glass front, red aluminum back). 

The iPhone 7 uses the Apple A10 Fusion  processor, 2 GB of RAM, and was available with 32 GB, 128 GB, or 256 GB of flash storage.

While I opted for the iPhone 7 Plus as my personal phone in the iPhone 7 era, I chose the then-new (and not offered since) jet black color. I immediately covered the glossy finish with a case to heed Apple’s warning that jet black “may show fine micro-abrasions with use.” (It did scratch easily!)

Source: EveryMac

iPhone 6s (16 GB, silver, 2015)

The iPhone 6s had a 4.7-inch “3D Touch” screen at 1334×750 (326 ppi, Retina HD). The iPhone 6s cameras were vastly improved over the iPhone 6 that preceded it: a rear 12-megapixel 4K iSight camera and a front 5-megapixel FaceTime camera in 720p (the iPhone 6 used a, 8-megapixel back camera and 1.2-megapixel front camera).

The iPhone 6s was available in four colors: silver (white glass front, silver back); gold (white glass front, gold back); space gray (black glass front, medium-gray back); and rose gold (white glass front, pink-tinted gold back). 

The iPhone 6s did not use a physical Home button, but used its Taptic engine to simulate the click. It also used a Touch ID fingerprint sensor in the Home button. 

Inside, the iPhone 6s used the Apple A9 processor with 2 GB of RAM and was available in 16 GB, 32 GB, 64 GB, or 128 GB of flash storage. The iPhone 6s was the last iPhone to include a headphone jack (located on the bottom) and used  the Lightning port to connect to computer, dock, or power adapter.

This iPhone 6s example is an entry-level 16 GB model in silver with a white front. Unfortunately, this particular iPhone has a slight crack in the lower-left front screen glass (although it functions perfectly).

Source: EveryMac

iPhone Stereo Headset (bulk packaging, 2007)

The iPhone Stereo Headset were the headphones that shipped with the first two iPhone models, the original iPhone (2007–2008) and the iPhone 3G (2008–2010). The headphones used a similar enclosed design as the later EarPods, and the right earbud included a control button with a microphone on the wire. The button is controlled by a squeeze and it can be set for a variety of tasks: answer/end calls, advance presentation slides, play/pause music/video, or capture photos. A double-press also allowed the user to skip to the next music track.

Note that the controller did not include the + and – option for volume and/or other controls, a feature now taken for granted in many headphone designs.

iLounge described these headphones as, “familiar and inexpensive, with very good earbud and microphone quality.” They also praised the bass response, warm sound, and the quality of the microphone.

This example is in Apple’s bulk packaging. I remember receiving the headphones when I attended an Apple Education professional development opportunity that required attendees to have a microphone. These were never unpackaged because I had brought and used my personal headphones.

Sources: Wikipedia, iLounge

iPhone 4S (2011)

The iPhone 4S was the product that first introduced the Siri voice assistant. The iPhone 4S was designed around a stainless-steel body with a glass front and back. It had a 3.5-inch LED-backlit 960×640 326 ppi multi-touch Retina display and included two noise-cancelling microphones. It was available in black or white.

The iPhone 4S supported both GSM and CDMA networks and included 802.11b/g/n and Bluetooth 4.0. It used a dual-core Apple A5 processor; 512 MB of RAM; and 8 GB, 16 GB, 32 GB, or 64 GB of internal storage. It had two cameras: an 8 megapixel HD camera (1080p at 30 FPS) with an LED flash on the rear and FaceTime camera on the front that allowed FaceTime video calls over Wi-Fi.

Source: EveryMac.com