iPad Smart Keyboard (for iPad Generation 7/8, unopened, 2019)

According to Apple’s website, “The Smart Keyboard is a full‑size keyboard made for iPad. It delivers a comfortable typing experience wherever you are and converts into a slim, durable front cover when you’re on the go.”

This keyboard uses Apple’s proprietary Smart connector so the keyboard does not require its own power. “Just attach the full-size Smart Keyboard to your iPad and start typing — no charging or pairing required. And when you’re finished, it folds up to become a slim, lightweight cover.”

The iPad Smart Keyboard is Apple’s first case-integrated keyboard for the base-model iPad. It is compatible with iPad (Generation 7 and 8), iPad Air (Generation 3), and iPad Pro 10.5‑inch.

Source: Apple (iPad Keyboards, iPad)

iPad 2 Dock (2011)

The iPad 2 Dock was released in 2011 along with the iPad 2 as a 30-pin charging option. In addition to charging, it also has a line-out audio port.

The iPad 2 Dock box somewhat confusingly designated the product as “iPad Dock.” However, the dock is a significantly larger design than the original iPad Dock, measuring 3.3 inches wide, 1.5 inches tall, and 3.6 inches deep. The sticker on the bottom of the box was printed as “iPad 2 Dock,” while the front of the box was printed with “iPad Dock.”

This dock included a front lip that made using it with an iPad in a case impossible.

Source: iLounge

30-pin Digital AV Adapter (unopened, 2012)

This adapter allows an iPad with the original 30-pin connector to be connected to an HDMI display and simultaneously charged. It is compatible with any iPad with a 30-pin connector, iPhone 4 (or later with a 30-pin connector), and iPod touch Generation 4 (or later with a 30-pin connector). Mirroring is supported only by iPad 2 (or later with a 30-pin connector) and iPhone 4s (or later with a 30-pin connector).

From my experience, the ability of an iPad to be mirrored on an HDMI screen is frequently misunderstood. Because an iPad screen is in the 4:3 aspect raitio, when it is mirrored on an HD display (16:9 aspect ratio or other wide format), some users are surprised that the entire external display is not “filled.” I have never been able to understand what the user is expecting—a ridiculously stretched version of the iPad display; a “zoomed” version of the iPad display with the top and bottom cut off; or that somehow the iPad will magically rearrange itself to fill a widescreen display, thus making it a completely new display and, therefore, not mirrored. Instead, the iPad works as expected and appears centered in the middle of a larger display with black bars on both sides (this is called “letterboxing”). If a user launches an app that uses the full screen, such as a presentation designed in HD format or an HD movie, the iPad fills the entire screen.

This 30-pin Digital AV Adapter is unopened in its original, somewhat beat up, packaging.

iPad Camera Connection Kit (2010)

According to Apple, the Apple iPad Camera Connection Kit supports “standard photo formats, including JPEG and RAW, along with SD and HD video formats, including H.264 and MPEG-4.” This connection kit is compatible with iPad Generations 1 –3 (using the 30-pin connector).

The kit consists of two adapters, the Camera Connector USB interface (plug it into the dock connector port on your iPad, then attach your digital camera or iPhone using a USB cable); and the SD Card Reader (import photos and videos directly from your camera’s SD card, connect it to your iPad, then insert your digital camera’s SD card into the slot).

I have both adapters and the original packaging in my collection.

Source: Apple (Australia), Wikipedia

Apple Pencil (original, 2015)

The original Apple Pencil was released along with the original iPad Pro in September 2015. The Apple Pencil can be used by the iPad Air (Generation 3), iPad mini (Generation 5), iPad Pro 10.5-inch, iPad (Generation 6 and 7), iPad Pro 12.9-inch (Generation 1 and 2), and iPad Pro 9.7-inch. It pairs to an iPad device using Bluetooth, and has a removable magnetically attached cap hiding a Lightning connector.

The original Apple Pencil somewhat awkwardly charges by plugging it into the lightning port of an Apple device; however, it also includes a female-to-female adapter that allows charging with a Lightning cable. While a full charge can last up to 12 hours, a 15-second charge provides about 30 minutes of use.

The Apple Pencil can be used for writing, drawing, or annotating in a wide variety of apps. Apple describes its features as having “pixel-perfect precision, tilt and pressure sensitivity, and imperceptible lag.”

Source: Wikipedia, Apple (description, specifications)

iPad (Generation 7, Wi-Fi, 32 GB, unopened, 2019)

The Generation 7 iPad differs from previous base iPad models with its larger 10.2-inch screen at 2160×1620 (264 ppi) (the Generation 6 iPad had a 9.7-inch screen) and the addition of the Smart Connector. The Smart Connector allows this iPad to use an Apple Smart Keyboard. This iPad was available in three colors: white front with a gold back, white front with silver back, and black front with a Space Gray back. This example is Space Gray.

The Generation 7 iPad uses the Apple A10 Fusion processor with 3 GB of RAM, and has 32 GB or 128 GB of internal storage. It also has an 8 Megapixel iSight camera on the back (1080p) and a 1.2 Megapixel FaceTime camera (720p) on the front. Wireless connectivity includes 802.11ac Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.2,. Its two wired ports are the Lightning port and a 3.5mm audio port. Internal sensors include accelerometer, gyroscope, ambient light sensor, compass, and barometer.

Aside from this Wi-Fi model, three Wi-Fi/Cellular models are available (US/CA, Global, and China).

Source: EveryMac

iPad mini (original, Wi-Fi, 16 GB, silver, unopened, 2012)

The original iPad mini featured a 7.9-inch screen at 1024×768 (163 ppi). Internally, it had a dual core 1 GHz Apple A5 processor; 512 MB of RAM; and 16, 32, or 64 GB of storage. It had two cameras: a rear-mounted 5 megapixel iSight camera (1080p) and a front-mounted 1.2 megapixel FaceTime HD camera (720p). The original iPad mini used a Lightning port.

I kept my original iPad mini in my daily backpack for a very long time due to its near perfect size and weight as a truly mobile device with the same 1024×768 screen as a standard iPad of the time (just with smaller pixels). I purchased this additional iPad mini as an example for my collection and never unboxed it. This version has a silver back and white front. 

Source: EveryMac 

iPad Case (for Original iPad, 2010)

This iPad Case was the only case made by Apple upon release of the original iPad in 2010. Like the iPhone case market, iPad cases became—and continue to be—a major business for both Apple and third-party manufacturers. Then and now, Apple’s case offerings vary in reviewer reception.

This original iPad Case was described by iLounge as a design in the middle of the pack. Specifically they state, “Using a protective lid…that folds around the back to become a prop-up video stand, the case is made from vinyl-like PVC plastic and has a microfiber interior. It’s designed to provide access to the device’s side buttons, headphone port…exposing the screen when you want to flip the lid open.” iLounge also correctly points out that the material “gathers marks and dirt in ways that no other case does, and the flip-closed front isn’t secured to the rest of the case in any way.”

This case, despite my best efforts at cleaning it, indeed suffers from marks that could not be removed. However, the original iPad that it was protecting was in perfect condition, thus speaking to its effectiveness at protecting the device.

The iLounge reviewer likes the case’s ability to fold and become a stand for viewing video. Interestingly, the reviewer overlooks the case’s ability to be flipped and set at a lower angle to make typing easier. This oversight is not unusual for 2010 when the iPad was often viewed only as a content consumption device, rather than acknowledging that it could also be used effectively for content creation.

Source: iLounge

iPad Pro (12.9-inch, Wi-Fi, 2015) with Smart Keyboard for the 12.9-inch iPad Pro (2015) and Apple Pencil (original, 2015)

The 12.9-inch iPad Pro was powered by an Apple A9X processor and had 4 GB of RAM; 32, 128, or 256 GB of storage; a rear-mounted 8 megapixel iSight camera (1080p); a front-mounted 1.2 megapixel FaceTime HD camera (720p); 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi; Bluetooth 4.2; dual microphones; two sets of stereo speakers; and a Lightning port. The screen was a 12.9-inch TFT touch-sensitive Retina display with 5.6 million pixels (2732×2048 at 264 ppi) and included an antireflective coating. A cellular-equipped model was also available.

The 12.9-inch iPad Pro was available in silver with a white front, gold with a white front, and space gray with a black front. This model is space gray.

This iPad Pro included a new Smart Connector that provided connectivity and power for the Apple Smart Keyboard.

The Apple Pencil was announced with this first-generation iPad Pro on September 9, 2015. The Pencil could be used with the first and second generation iPad Pro models. It connected wirelessly using Bluetooth and had a removable cap that concealed a Lightning connector for charging. It used pressure sensitivity and angle detection and had very low latency, making it function like a real pencil with no delay.

Sources: EveryMac.com, Wikipedia.com

iPad (original, Wi-Fi, 32 GB, 2010)

The original iPad announcement was outlined in a January 27, 2010, press release issued by Apple. The iPad was described as, “a revolutionary device for browsing the web, reading and sending email, enjoying photos, watching videos, listening to music, playing games, reading e-books and much more.” Steve Jobs said it was, “a magical and revolutionary device…[that] defines an entirely new category of devices that will connect users with their apps and content in a much more intimate, intuitive and fun way than ever before.”

The original iPad used a 9.7-inch multitouch display (1024×768 at 132 ppi). It ran the same operating system as iPhone, which at the time was referred to as iPhone OS 3.2 (the name “iOS” would not be used until June 2010).

Internally, the original iPad had a 1 GHz Apple A4 processor; 16, 32, or 64 GB of storage; 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi; an accelerometer; an ambient light sensor; a digital compass; GPS; two mono speakers; and a built-in microphone. The iPad was 0.5 inches thick and weighed 1.6 pounds.

Sources: EveryMac.com, Apple.com, Wikipedia.com