Newton MessagePad 130 (1996)

The Newton MessagePad 130 was the fifth and final 100-series device in the MessagePad lineup. It featured a 20 MHz ARM 610 processor, 8 MB of ROM, and 2.5 MB of RAM. It had infrared-beaming capabilities for wireless file sharing. Its display was a 320×240 pressure-sensitive, backlit monochrome display that used an included telescoping stylus that was stored in the Newton’s case.

The Newton was among the world’s first Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), a term that was created to describe the Newton. The MessagePad 130 was similar to the MessagePad 120, but added a backlit textured display, more RAM, and it ran the Newton 2.0 operating system. The texture on the screen was meant to simulate paper, however, this well-used example reveals that the texture wore off with use.

The MessagePad 130 could be powered by 4 AA batteries or an AC adapter. The batteries were easily accessed on the lower-back side of the device.

Like other Newton models, the case color was dark greenish-gray. It weighed just under 1 pound (0.45 kg) and measured 8 inches high x 4 inches wide x 1.18 inches deep. This model used a built-in hinged cover to protect the screen when not in use. The stylus used a spring-loaded telescoping design and slid into the case in the upper-right corner.

Sources: Everymac, Wikipedia

Newton Press box (1995)

Newton Press was a software application for the Newton, Apple’s handheld Personal Digital Assistant. On a two-page MessagePad Accessories sheet, Newton Press is described:

Newton Press
This easy-to-use software allows you to publish electronic documents such as travel itineraries, reference books, or sales charts on your personal computer for viewing and annotating on your MessagePad.

The box states:

“Create documents on your desktop computer, then publish them as Newton books. Drag and drop word processing documents, graphics files, or text created on your personal computer directly to the Newton Press application for simple, one-step creation of Newton electronic reference books. Or use the formatting capabilities to format your books, create tables of contents, establish paragraph links, and more. Anyone with a Newton personal digital assistant (PDA) can view, annotate, fax, or print the books you create.”

This copy of Newton Press is unopened and in its original shrink wrap.

Source: Apple

Newton Connection Kit for Macintosh (1993)

The Newton Connection Kit for Macintosh included Newton Connection software on two 3.5-inch floppy disks, a serial cable, and manuals. The kit connected a Newton personal digital assistant to a Macintosh computer and allowed the Newton to be synchronized with a Macintosh. Users could also transfer files, restore the Newton, and install software onto the Newton. A Newton Connection Kit for Windows was also available.

Source: Wikipedia.org