QuickTake 100 (1994)

The QuickTake 100 is considered one of the first consumer digital cameras and was only available for about one year, from 1994 to 1995. The QuickTake 100 model was replaced by the QuickTake 150 in 1995 (using the same design) and then the QuickTake 200 in 1996 (a new design manufactured by Fuji).

The camera had 5 button controls: one to control the shutter, and four surrounding a small black/gray LCD panel on the back to control flash, resolution, self-timer, and a recessed button to delete all photos.

The camera sold for $749 and could take eight photos at 640×480 resolution, 32 photos at 320×240 resolution, or a combination of the sizes in 24-bit color. Although the QuickTake 100 had a built-in flash, it had no zoom or focus controls, nor could it preview or delete individual photos from the internal memory. Photos were downloaded to a computer using a serial cable and included QuickTake software. The QuickTake software also included functions such as rotate, resize, crop, and export.

After the Macintosh version of the QuickTake 100 was released, a Windows version followed six months later.

QuickTake cameras also included several accessories, such as a leather cover with a hand strap, a neck strap, a leather case, a battery booster pack (shown here), and a snap-on close-up lens.

Source: Wikipedia

iPod classic (Generation 7, 120 GB, silver, 2008)

This Late 2018 iPod classic was very similar to the previous Generation 6 model. This iPod was available in 120 GB or 160 GB capacities, had a 2.5-inch color LCD display (320×240, 163 ppi), and was available with a black or silver anodized aluminum front and a chrome stainless steel back. This model is the third generation of the iPod classic.

The software included a Cover Flow option for selecting albums with three games bundled, including iQuiz, Klondike, and Vortex.

Source: EveryMac.com

iMac Core 2 Duo 2.0 17-inch (2006)

The iMac Core 2 Duo 2.0 was the second iMac design to use a flat-panel display. It featured a 2.0 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo processor (T7200) (with two independent processor cores on a single chip), 1 GB of RAM (667 MHz DDR2 SDRAM, PC2-5300), a 160 GB (7200 RPM) Serial ATA hard drive, a vertically-mounted slot-loading DVD+R DL SuperDrive, a built-in iSight video camera, and built-in stereo speakers. The flat panel display was a 17-inch TFT Active Matrix LCD at 1440×900 pixels.

Ports on this iMac included three USB 2.0 ports, two FireWire 400 ports, Gigabit Ethernet, and mini-DVI supporting an external display in extended desktop mode (rather than only supporting mirrored mode). This iMac also included built-in AirPort Extreme support.

Source: EveryMac.com

iMac G4/700 15-inch (flat panel, 2002)

The iMac G4/700 (Flat Panel) featured a 700 MHz PowerPC 7441 (G4) processor, 128 MB or 256 MB of RAM (PC133 SDRAM), a 40.0 GB Ultra ATA/66 hard drive (5400 RPM), either a tray-loading CD-RW drive or DVD-ROM/CD-RW Combo Drive, and a 15-inch TFT Active Matrix LCD display.

The internal components of this iMac are contained in a 10.6-inch half-sphere. Protruding from the top of the half sphere was a chrome stainless steel neck supporting the display. This design is sometimes referred to as the “sunflower iMac.” In addition to the polished stainless steel, the case and display are “ice white.” This iMac also included a matching ice white Apple Pro Keyboard and Mouse. The more expensive Combo Drive configuration of this iMac shipped with two clear spherical external Apple Pro Speakers.

This iMac shipped with MacOS X 10.1 and MacOS 9.2 installed with MacOS X selected as the default OS. 

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod (original, 2001)

While Apple was not the first to offer an MP3 player, they often get the credit for making the product get accepted into the mainstream with its groundbreaking design, features, and perhaps more importantly, the iTunes software experience that would eventually add the iTunes Store and completely change the course of the music industry.

The iPod was about the size of a deck of playing cards, white on the front, and polished stainless steel on the back. The look that quickly became iconic. The front of the original iPod used a rotating scroll wheel surrounded by four physical buttons—menu, forward, back, and play/pause—with an unmarked select button at the center. The design introduced a brand new operating system that allowed easy navigation to songs and playlists and could be controlled with one hand.

The original iPod required a Mac with iTunes. The iTunes software on the Mac provided the organization for the music and playlists and the iPod allowed your music to be portable. It featured a 5 GB hard drive to store 1,000 songs, a 60-mW amplifier, a FireWire port, and a standard 3.5-mm headphone jack, and a 2-inch black and white backlit LCD display. The battery lasted 10 hours. A 10 GB option was available after March 21, 2002, increasing the storage to 2,000 songs.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod Generation 2 (2002)

The iPod Generation 2 was similar to the original iPod in design, but the moving scroll wheel was replaced by a stationary touch-sensitive scroll wheel. In addition, the FireWire port gained a cover. The top of the iPod design also changed to allow the buttons to be surrounded by stainless steel cutouts instead of the plastic top used in the original iPod. Accessories were also added including a wired remote control, a thinner Firewire cable, and a carrying case.

The iPod Generation 2 was offered in 10 GB and 20 GB models and also added Windows compatibility.

Other than the increased hard drive sizes that allowed the iPod to hold up to 4,000 songs in the 20 GB model, the other specifications were the same as the original iPod: a 60-mW amplifier, a FireWire port, and a standard 3.5-mm headphone jack, and a 2-inch black and white backlit LCD display, and a 10-hour battery.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod nano Generation 4 (8 GB, blue, 2008)

Replacing the “squat” design of the Generation 3, the iPod nano Generation 4 returned to a “skinny” design similar to its predecessors. The new wraparound curved aluminum and glass case was offered in an unprecedented nine colors: silver, black, purple, blue, green, yellow, orange, pink, and (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition. The display was a wide-format 2-inch (diagonal) color LCD display at 320×240.

The iPod nano Generation 4 used either 8 GB or 16 GB of flash memory, capable of storing 2000 or 4000 songs, 7000 or 14,000 photos, and 8 hours or 16 hours of video. All colors were offered for both capacities.

The iPod nano Generation 4 features included an accelerometer (automatically switched to “Cover Flow” navigation in landscape orientation), games and videos only played in landscape, a new Genius feature to dynamically create playlists, and shake-to-shuffle for songs. Accessibility options were added including larger text and spoken menu items. It also included Nike+iPod support, FM radio tagging (using the Apple Radio Remote), support for audio crossfade, and games including Maze, Klondike, and Vortex.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod classic Generation 6 (80 GB, black, 2007)

The iPod classic Generation 6 continued the “classic” iPod design and used a 4200 RPM ATA-66 hard drive long after all other iPod models had switched to flash memory. The advantage to the spinning hard drive was that it could hold far more songs for a lower price.

The iPod classic Generation 6 offered a 80 GB or 160 GB hard rive capable of supporting 20,000 or 40,000 songs and 100 or 200 hours of video.

The iPod classic models use a 2.5-inch color LCD display with an LED backlight at 320×240 and use cases with either a silver or black anodized aluminum front and a chrome stainless steel back (previous models used white or black polycarbonate fronts). The iPod classic models were the first full-size iPod models to not be offered in white.

The larger case also allowed for long battery life: 30 hours of music and 5 hours of video for the 80 GB model and 40 hours of music and 7 hours of video for the 160 GB model.

The software included a CoverFlow option for selecting albums, and three games were bundled: iQuiz, Klondike, and Vortex.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod nano Generation 3 (8 GB, red, 2007)

The iPod nano Generation 3 used a design unique to the iPod family with “squat” proportions in a thin case. It was available in 4 GB or 8 GB versions, with the 4 GB model offered only in silver, and the 8 GB models offered in silver, light blue, light green, black, and (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition, and later pink option was added. All models had a chrome stainless steel back.

Compared to the iPod nano Generation 2, the Generation 3 added a larger 2-inch (diagonal) color LCD display at 320×240 resolution, support for video on the internal display, and video out via the dock.

The software is greatly improved with enhancements including a Cover Flow option for selecting albums. Three games were also bundled: iQuiz, Klondike, and Vortex.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod nano Generation 2 (4 GB, green, 2006, unopened)

The iPod nano Generation 2 was available in 2 GB, 4 GB, or 8 GB flash memory capacities, capable of supporting either 500, 1000, or 2000 songs. In addition to songs, it could hold up to 25,000 photos on its 1.5 inch (diagonal) LCD display.

The 2 GB model was only available in silver; the 4 GB model was available in silver, green, blue, and pink; and the 8 GB model was only available in black.

Source: EveryMac.com